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Analysis by sex of low back pain among workers from small companies in the Paris area: severity and occupational consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32949
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1999 Oct;56(10):696-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
J. Alcouffe
P. Manillier
M. Brehier
C. Fabin
F. Faupin
Author Affiliation
Association des Centres Médicaux et Sociaux de la Région Parisienne, Suresnes, France.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1999 Oct;56(10):696-701
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Human Engineering
Humans
Lifting
Logistic Models
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Paris - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe workers with low back symptoms, to identify risk factors and to assess the occupational consequences separately in men and women. METHODS: A descriptive study was conducted between 1 October 1996 and 31 December 1996 in a sample of workers selected at random from all types of small companies in the Paris area. A group of 202 occupational physicians interviewed 7129 workers with a standardised questionnaire including the Nordic questionnaire. Data analysis was performed by sex in the two groups: with low back pain and without low back pain over the previous 12 months. The group with low back pain was then divided into four subgroups: mild cases (without referred pain), moderate cases (with referred pain above the knee), serious cases (with referred pain below the knee), and low back pain with occupational consequences. RESULTS: 7010 questionnaires were able to be evaluated. The sample consisted of 54.8% of men (3842) and 45.2% of women (3168), with a mean age of 37.8 and 37.0 years, respectively (p 10 kg, in women (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.25) and in men (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.53), uncomfortable working positions (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.58 to 2.17 and OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.69 to 2.43), and absence of means to achieve good quality work (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.63 and OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.65), respectively. Driving was a risk factor only in men and its importance increased with driving time (driving > 4 hours a day (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.09)). Severe low back pain was linked to female sex (10.2% of women v 6.6% of men), high BMI, aging, and uncomfortable working positions. Low back pain with occupational consequences (n = 258) was not linked to sex, but only to aging and severity. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence and severity of low back pain were higher in women, although they seemed to be less exposed to known occupational risk factors. However, our results indicate a preponderance of these risk factors among female workers. Particular attention must therefore be paid to lifting of weights and uncomfortable working positions in female jobs (clerk, trading, health care staff).
PubMed ID
10658550 View in PubMed
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[Approaches to lower occurrence of chronic bronchitis in railway workers subjected to occupational risk of respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164684
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2007;(1):30-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
T A Zhuravleva
A S Ul'ianova
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2007;(1):30-4
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bronchitis, Chronic - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Primary prevention - methods
Railroads
Recurrence - prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The article deals with analysis of peculiarities in morbidity and social importance of chronic bronchitis as a leading nosologic entity among railway workers whose work is associated with constant exposure to risk factors of respiratory diseases. The authors compare clinical efficiency of various schemes concerning treatment of chronic bronchitis and the relapses prevention.
PubMed ID
17354600 View in PubMed
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Are occupational factors important determinants of socioeconomic inequalities in musculoskeletal pain?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91895
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Aug;34(4):250-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Mehlum Ingrid Sivesind
Kristensen Petter
Kjuus Helge
Wergeland Ebba
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. ism@stami.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Aug;34(4):250-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Occupations
Pain - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Professional Autonomy
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to quantify socioeconomic inequalities in low-back pain, neck-shoulder pain, and arm pain in the general working population in Oslo and to examine the impact of job characteristics on these inequalities. METHODS: All economically active 30-, 40-, and 45-year-old persons who attended the Oslo health study in 2000-2001 and answered questions on physical job demands, job autonomy, and musculoskeletal pain were included (N=7293). Occupational class was used as an indicator of socioeconomic status. The lower occupational classes were compared with higher grade professionals, and prevalences, prevalence ratios, prevalence differences, and population attributable fractions were calculated. RESULTS: There were marked, stepwise socioeconomic gradients for musculoskeletal pain, steeper for the men than for the women. The relative differences (prevalence ratios) were larger for low-back pain and arm pain than for neck-shoulder pain. The absolute differences (prevalence differences) were the largest for low-back pain. Physical job demands explained a substantial proportion of the absolute occupational class inequalities in low-back pain, while job autonomy was more important in explaining the inequalities in neck-shoulder pain and arm pain. The estimated population attributable fractions supported the impact of job characteristics at the working population level, especially for low-back pain. CONCLUSIONS: In this cross-sectional study, physical job demands and job autonomy explained a substantial proportion of occupational class inequalities in self-reported musculoskeletal pain in the working population in Oslo. This finding indicates that the workplace may be an important arena for preventive efforts to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in musculoskeletal pain.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Aug;34(4):235-818820820
PubMed ID
18815713 View in PubMed
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[Can work-related eye injuries be avoided?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50607
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Nov 4;124(21):2776-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2004
Author
Nils Bull
Gunnar Høvding
Trond Riise
Bente E Moen
Author Affiliation
Øyeavdelingen, Haukeland Universitetssykehus, 5021 Bergen. nils.bull@uib.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Nov 4;124(21):2776-9
Date
Nov-4-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
English Abstract
Eye Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Eye Protective Devices
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Registries
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The eyes are among the organs most frequently hurt in occupational injuries. The characteristics of eye injuries were studied in order to suggest preventive measures. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Analyses were performed on work-related eye injuries reported to the Norwegian Injury Surveillance System from a selection of emergency centres during the period 1990-2002, and on injuries reported by employers to the National Insurance Administration 1998-2001. RESULTS: The occurrence of injuries was stable over the period. Men sustained 94.4% of the injuries registered in injury surveillance system. The highest incidence was among those 20 to 24 years of age. Metal cutters and tools for polishing were involved in 25.7% of cases. Analyses of the injuries reported to the National Insurance Administration showed an odds ratio of 8.8 (95% CI 7.6-10.1) for injuries to workers in metal industry, 18.8 (95% CI 17.0-20.8) in automotive industry, and only 0.5 (95% CI 0.1-3.4) in oil refineries. Workers in oil refineries have a potentially hazardous work environment, but there, eye protection is mandatory. INTERPRETATION: There was no decline in the incidence of work-related eye injuries from 1990 to 2002. Workers in metal industry have a high risk of injuries and employers should consider requiring the use of eye protection.
PubMed ID
15534674 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of pathology development in medical personnel of multiple-field hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140486
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(8):27-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010

[Complex hygienic evaluation of working conditions and environmental protection at glass works].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132175
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 May-Jun;(3):41-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sh S Bakhritdinov
R U Akhmadaliev
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 May-Jun;(3):41-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Female
Glass
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Incidence
Industry
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The working conditions and sanitary-and-hygienic state of the Kvarts glass works in the town of Kuvasai were studied. Harmful industrial factors were shown to influence on the incidence of disease with temporary disability; atmospheric emission of pollutants and discharge of sewage were calculated. The results of the analysis were assessed in the hygienic point and necessary recommendations to improve working conditions and the environment.
PubMed ID
21842735 View in PubMed
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Consideration on a limit for lifetime occupational radiation exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21478
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 1998 Jul;37(2):81-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
A M Kellerer
E. Nekolla
Author Affiliation
Radiobiological Institute, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 1998 Jul;37(2):81-5
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
England - epidemiology
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health
Radiation
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Annual dose limits in occupational radiation exposure are merely a secondary constraint in addition to the primary rule of dose reduction and justification. The limits may, therefore, be reached only in rare, special cases. However, in principle, there might be cases in which the annual limit is continuously exhausted throughout a working life; a high total dose of 0.8 Sv could then be reached. In view of this possibility, there have been considerations of an added restriction by limiting the lifetime occupational dose to 0.4 Sv. The implications of such lifetime doses are considered, and it is shown that an exposure up to the maximum of 0.8 Sv will lead to the need for compensation, if a leukaemia were to occur in the exposed worker. A lifetime dose of 0.4 Sv equally spread over a working life will not lead to the critical value of the probability of causation in excess of 0.5. Nevertheless, it could cause such critical values when it is accumulated during shorter periods. More decisive than the probabilities of causation are, however, the absolute numbers of excess cases of leukaemia due to the occupational exposure. It is seen that less than one excess case would be expected if a group of 100 workers were all exposed to the maximum of 0.8 Sv. Since lifetime doses of 0.8 or 0.4 Sv will be accumulated in very few cases and only with special justification, there appears to be little need to introduce a further limit of lifetime exposure in addition to the current annual limit.
PubMed ID
9728739 View in PubMed
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Crew referrals to dentists and medical specialist ashore: a descriptive study of practice on three passenger vessels during one year.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78714
Source
Int Marit Health. 2006;57(1-4):127-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Dahl Eilif
Author Affiliation
Surgical Department, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical Center, 0027 Oslo, Norway. eilifdahl@hotmail.com
Source
Int Marit Health. 2006;57(1-4):127-35
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dentistry
Employment
Female
Humans
Male
Naval Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Ships
Specialties, Medical
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To study crew referrals to out-patient port services from 3 passenger ships during 12 months (2004), with focus on dentist appointments. The median number of crew on Ship A was 561, on Ship B 534 and on Ship C 614. METHODS: Crew referrals were registered continuously and after each cruise segment recorded in the ship's doctor's medical cruise report, from which the data were retrieved and reviewed. RESULTS: During 2004 the doctors of the 3 sister ships had a total of 8888 crew consultations (Table 1). Mean number of doctor consultations for crew was 17.5 a day. On Ship A 50%, on B 59% and on C 70% of the port referrals were dentist appointments. A crew member was referred to a dentist every 7 (Ship C) to 10 days (Ships A + B). Among the specified dental referrals, 18% were extraction requests. CONCLUSIONS: The ship's doctors had a busy crew practice, but were neither trained nor equipped to do elective dentistry aboard. Crew referral rate to services ashore was low, but 50-70% of the referrals for out-patient port services concerned dentistry. Inadequate health insurance caused low-wage crew to request free extractions instead of expensive repair in high-cost ports. As dentistry in local ports is a poor substitute for the person's own dentist, doctors performing seafarer examinations should ensure that dental problems are solved before sign-on.
PubMed ID
17312701 View in PubMed
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78 records – page 1 of 8.