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28 records – page 1 of 3.

Cancer cluster investigation: toward a more rational approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230472
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Jul 15;141(2):105-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1989
Author
J A Leech
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Jul 15;141(2):105-6
Date
Jul-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Epidemiologic Methods
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Ontario
Space-Time Clustering
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1983 Feb;40(1):1-76297532
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1984 May;41(2):151-76326794
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1987 Jan;77(1):52-63789238
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1976 Jul;114(1):187-227779552
Comment In: CMAJ. 1989 Oct 1;141(7):657-602790597
PubMed ID
2743225 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence and mortality among Swedish smelter workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25577
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1989 Feb;46(2):82-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1989
Author
A I Sandström
S G Wall
A. Taube
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of Umeå.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1989 Feb;46(2):82-9
Date
Feb-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Cancer incidence was analysed in a retrospective cohort of 3710 male Swedish smelter workers between 1958 and 1982 using a record linkage with the Swedish Cancer Register. During this period 467 cancers were registered in the cohort. An excess incidence of total cancer of about 30% was shown relative to general and local populations mainly due to 120 respiratory cancers. Excess SMRs for all cancer and respiratory cancer were highly significant. Trends in the incidence of cancer were studied using moving five year calendar periods. A decreasing rate of lung cancer was found during 1976-80 for both mortality and incidence. Incidence figures for two more years show a continued decreasing trend. This is validated by an analysis of different employment cohorts, taking latency into account, showing that the later the date of first employment the lower the incidence of cancer, especially for lung cancer.
PubMed ID
2923829 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality among a group of fluorspar miners exposed to radon progeny.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232096
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Dec;128(6):1266-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988
Author
H I Morrison
R M Semenciw
Y. Mao
D T Wigle
Author Affiliation
Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Dec;128(6):1266-75
Date
Dec-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Mining
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality
Newfoundland and Labrador
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Radon - adverse effects - analysis
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
A cohort study of the mortality experience (1950-1984) of 1,772 Newfoundland underground fluorspar miners occupationally exposed to high levels of radon daughters (mean dose = 382.8 working levels months) has been conducted. Observed numbers of cancers of the lung, salivary gland, and buccal cavity and pharynx were significantly elevated among these miners. A highly significant relation was noted between radon daughter exposure and risk of dying of lung cancer; the small numbers of salivary gland (n = 2) and buccal cavity and pharynx (n = 6) cancers precluded meaningful analysis of dose response. Attributable and relative risk coefficients for lung cancer were estimated as 6.3 deaths per working level month per million person-years and 0.9% per working level month, respectively. Relative risk coefficients were highest for those first exposed before age 20 years. Cigarette smokers had relative and attributable risk coefficients comparable to those of nonsmokers. Relative risks fell sharply with age, whereas attributable risks were lowest in the youngest and oldest age groups. The results suggest that efforts to raise existing occupational exposure standards may be inappropriate.
PubMed ID
3195567 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality of granite workers 1940-1985.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103645
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1990;(97):43-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
R S Koskela
M. Klockars
E. Järvinen
A. Rossi
P J Kolari
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1990;(97):43-53
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dust - adverse effects
Finland
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Occupations
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Silicon Dioxide
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to investigate the cancer mortality of granite workers. The study comprised 1026 workers who took up such work between 1940 and 1971. The number of person-years was 23,434, and the number of deaths was 296. During the total follow-up period, 59 tumours were observed as compared with 54.4 expected. An excess mortality from tumours was observed in workers followed up for 20 years or more. Of the 59 tumours, 31 were lung cancers (expected 19.9), and 18 gastrointestinal cancers (expected 11.6), nine of which were stomach cancers (expected 7.1). Mortality from lung cancer was excessive for workers followed up for at least 15 years (28 observed, 12.7 expected). The results indicate that granite exposure per se may be an etiological factor in the initiation or promotion of malignant neoplasms.
PubMed ID
2164502 View in PubMed
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Causes of work-related injuries among young workers in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158606
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2008 May;51(5):357-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Theresa Holizki
Rose McDonald
Valerie Foster
Michael Guzmicky
Author Affiliation
WorkSafeBC (the Workers' Compensation Board of BC), Richmond, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2008 May;51(5):357-63
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
British Columbia - epidemiology
Databases as Topic
Female
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Occupational Health
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seat Belts
Workers' Compensation
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Abstract
We conducted a study to determine the types and causes of serious injuries to young workers (YW) (ages 14-24) in British Columbia.
The WorkSafeBC database from 2000 to 2005 was searched for all claims, all non-health-care-only (NHCO) injuries and all serious injury claims involving workers aged 14-24.
Of 384,250 NHCO claims, 15.6% were for YW, not significantly different from the British Columbia workforce (P > 0.75). Of the 5217 serious injuries, 9.8% (including 40 fatalities) were to YW-455 males and 56 females, significantly different from the workforce (50% male) ((2) = 259.8; df = 1; P
PubMed ID
18302139 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Ecologic and epidemiologic studies in social and hygienic monitoring systems].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184376
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(5):23-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003

[Epidemiological research on the late sequelae of exposure to occupational factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233565
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1988 Feb;(2):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988

[Epidemiologic surveillance of pleural mesothelioma in Italy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227616
Source
Ann Ist Super Sanita. 1991;27(2):319-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
T. Vetrugno
P. Comba
D. Savelli
S. Belli
C. Magnani
Author Affiliation
Laboratorio di Igiene Ambientale, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma.
Source
Ann Ist Super Sanita. 1991;27(2):319-24
Date
1991
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Australia - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Italy - epidemiology
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Population Surveillance
Quebec - epidemiology
Registries
South Africa - epidemiology
Abstract
A collaborative study has been performed in order to detect cases of pleural mesothelioma diagnosed or treated in Italy in the years 1984-88. Cases have been notified to ISS by 88 centres (clinics of thoracic surgery and respiratory diseases, oncologic centres, institutes of pathology), active in 14 Italian regions. Altogether, 575 cases (415 males and 160 females) have been included in the study. Information on occupation and/or on non occupational exposure to asbestos was available for 65% of the subjects, and the occurrence of definite or possible exposure to asbestos was estimated for 58% of them.
PubMed ID
1755586 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of carcinogenic risk in friction product workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220775
Source
Med Lav. 1993 Jul-Aug;84(4):290-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
P M Kogan
A S Yatsenko
E S Tregubov
E B Gurvich
L E Kuzina
Author Affiliation
Medical Scientific Center for Prevention and Protection of Workers' Health, Sverdlovsk, USSR.
Source
Med Lav. 1993 Jul-Aug;84(4):290-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Asbestos - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dust - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Neoplasms, Experimental - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Rats
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Mortality rates of two cohorts of asbestos friction product (FP) workers were studied in comparison with the population of the adjoining towns over periods of 20 and 40 years respectively. The second cohort was subdivided into 3 subcohorts exposed to chrysotile asbestos (CA), vulcanization and/or polymerization vapours and gases (VPGV) and asbestos bakelite (AB) or asbestos rubber (AR) dusts. In the first cohort no deaths from lung cancer were recorded, even though the total tumour mortality was higher than in the general population. In the second cohort an excess tumour mortality was observed in the first subcohort for stomach cancer only. In the other two subcohorts the expected rates were higher for all the tumour sites. Following intraperitoneal injection of CA, AB and AR dusts, malignant tumours developed in 31.5% of the rats which received CA, and in about 10% of the rats which were injected with AB and AR dusts. Also, the mean longevity of CA-treated animals was significantly lower than in the other two groups. Thus, the carcinogenic risk was real in the group of FP production workers with significant CA exposure only.
PubMed ID
8255260 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.