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150 records – page 1 of 15.

A 15-year prospective study of shift work and disability pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93753
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tüchsen F.
Christensen K B
Lund T.
Feveile H.
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ftu@nrcwe.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Retirement
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the hazard ratio for disability pension associated with shift work. METHODS: Cohorts of shift and day workers were identified in three waves of the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study and followed up for incidence of disability pension in a national register of social transfer payment. A total of 3980 female and 4025 male employees were included in the cohorts. Information about shift work status, age, smoking habits, body mass index and ergonomic work environment were updated according to responses in subsequent waves of the survey when possible. Respondents reporting shift work were classified as shift workers in the following waves as well. Respondents were followed in the register from the time of first interview and were censored at the time of their 60th birthday, emigration, death or end of follow-up (18 June 2006). The authors used the Cox proportional hazards model to estimate hazard ratios for incidence of disability pension and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The authors observed 253 new disability pensions among women and 173 among men during 56 903 and 57 886 person-years at risk respectively, Among women, shift work predicted disability after adjustment for age, general health and socioeconomic status HR 1.39 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.82). After further adjustment for body mass index, smoking habits, socioeconomic status and ergonomic exposures the association remained statistically significant HR 1.34 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.75). Shift work was not associated with disability among men. CONCLUSION: Shift work might be moderately associated with disability pension among women; however, more powerful studies are needed to establish the possible association.
PubMed ID
18198201 View in PubMed
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Age and gender differences in exposure patterns and low back pain in the MUSIC-Norrtälje study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52540
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Sep;Suppl 1:26-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999

Analysis by sex of low back pain among workers from small companies in the Paris area: severity and occupational consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32949
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1999 Oct;56(10):696-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
J. Alcouffe
P. Manillier
M. Brehier
C. Fabin
F. Faupin
Author Affiliation
Association des Centres Médicaux et Sociaux de la Région Parisienne, Suresnes, France.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1999 Oct;56(10):696-701
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Human Engineering
Humans
Lifting
Logistic Models
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Paris - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe workers with low back symptoms, to identify risk factors and to assess the occupational consequences separately in men and women. METHODS: A descriptive study was conducted between 1 October 1996 and 31 December 1996 in a sample of workers selected at random from all types of small companies in the Paris area. A group of 202 occupational physicians interviewed 7129 workers with a standardised questionnaire including the Nordic questionnaire. Data analysis was performed by sex in the two groups: with low back pain and without low back pain over the previous 12 months. The group with low back pain was then divided into four subgroups: mild cases (without referred pain), moderate cases (with referred pain above the knee), serious cases (with referred pain below the knee), and low back pain with occupational consequences. RESULTS: 7010 questionnaires were able to be evaluated. The sample consisted of 54.8% of men (3842) and 45.2% of women (3168), with a mean age of 37.8 and 37.0 years, respectively (p 10 kg, in women (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.25) and in men (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.53), uncomfortable working positions (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.58 to 2.17 and OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.69 to 2.43), and absence of means to achieve good quality work (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.63 and OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.65), respectively. Driving was a risk factor only in men and its importance increased with driving time (driving > 4 hours a day (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.09)). Severe low back pain was linked to female sex (10.2% of women v 6.6% of men), high BMI, aging, and uncomfortable working positions. Low back pain with occupational consequences (n = 258) was not linked to sex, but only to aging and severity. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence and severity of low back pain were higher in women, although they seemed to be less exposed to known occupational risk factors. However, our results indicate a preponderance of these risk factors among female workers. Particular attention must therefore be paid to lifting of weights and uncomfortable working positions in female jobs (clerk, trading, health care staff).
PubMed ID
10658550 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the incidence of vibration disease in machine-building industry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103746
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(7):35-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
G A Suvorov
O K Kravchenko
A E Ermolenko
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(7):35-9
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Engineering - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Sex Factors
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
A study was performed of vibration disease prevalence and morbidity dynamics for 10 years at the enterprises of the RSFSR Ministry of Machine-Building Industry. The results of the study proved that the major VD prevalence was found in automobile, heavy and energy machinery industries, machine-tool and agriculture machinery industry (80%). With regard to the morbidity rate and duration of work/D morbidity correlation, the contributors identified 8 major VD-risk professions, including those for female workers, an earlier development of the disease being more characteristic of females in some professional groups. It was established that some are less/or more liable to VD in comparison with others of the same professional group, which can be accounted for by different individual factors that influence the latent development of the disease. The revealed differences can determine the most promising techniques in VD prevention at machine-engineering plants.
PubMed ID
2145205 View in PubMed
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Are female healthcare workers at higher risk of occupational injury?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152064
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2009 May;59(3):149-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Hasanat Alamgir
Shicheng Yu
Sharla Drebit
Catherine Fast
Catherine Kidd
Author Affiliation
Statistics and Evaluation, Occupational Health and Safety Agency for Healthcare in British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. hasanat@ohsah.bc.ca
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2009 May;59(3):149-52
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Workers' Compensation - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Differential risks of occupational injuries by gender have been examined across various industries. With the number of employees in healthcare rising and an overwhelming proportion of this workforce being female, it is important to address this issue in this growing sector.
To determine whether compensated work-related injuries among females are higher than their male colleagues in the British Columbia healthcare sector.
Incidents of occupational injury resulting in compensated days lost from work over a 1-year period for all healthcare workers were extracted from a standardized operational database and the numbers of productive hours were obtained from payroll data. Injuries were grouped into all injuries and musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs). Detailed analysis was conducted using Poisson regression modelling.
A total of 42 332 employees were included in the study of whom 11% were male and 89% female. When adjusted for age, occupation, sub-sector, employment category, health region and facility, female workers had significantly higher risk of all injuries [rate ratio (95% CI) = 1.58 (1.24-2.01)] and MSIs [1.43 (1.11-1.85)] compared to their male colleagues.
Occupational health and safety initiatives should be gender sensitive and developed accordingly.
Notes
Comment In: Occup Med (Lond). 2009 May;59(3):13719396939
PubMed ID
19286989 View in PubMed
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Asbestos exposure and survival in malignant mesothelioma: a description of 122 consecutive cases at an occupational clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120270
Source
Int J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Oct;2(4):224-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
E. Skammeritz
L H Omland
J P Johansen
O. Omland
Author Affiliation
Danish Ramazzini Center, Department of Occupational Medicine, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. ellenskammeritz@gmail.com
Source
Int J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Oct;2(4):224-36
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - toxicity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupations
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
The natural history and etiology of malignant mesothelioma (MM) is already thoroughly described in the literature, but there is still debate on prognostic factors, and details of asbestos exposure and possible context with clinical and demographic data, have not been investigated comprehensively.
Description of patients with MM, focusing on exposure, occupation, survival and prognostic factors.
Review of medical records of patients with MM from 1984 to 2010 from a Danish Occupational clinic. Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and prognostic factors were identified by Cox regression analysis.
110 (90.2%) patients were male, and 12 (9.8%) were female. The median (interquartile rang [IQR]) age was 65 (13) years. Pleural MM was seen in 101 (82.8%) patients, and peritoneal in 11 (9.0%); two (1.6%) had MM to tunica vaginalis testis, and eight (6.6%) to multiple serosal surfaces. We found 68 (55.7%) epithelial tumors, 26 (21.3%) biphasic, and 6 (4.9%) sarcomatoid. 12 (9.8%) patients received tri-modal therapy, 66 (54.1%) received one-/two-modality treatment, and 36 (29.5%) received palliative care. Asbestos exposure was confirmed in 107 (91.0%) patients, probable in four (3.3%), and unidentifiable in 11 (9.0%). The median (IQR) latency was 42 (12.5) years. Exposure predominantly occurred in shipyards. The median overall survival was 1.05 (95% CI: 0.96-1.39) years; 5-year survival was 5.0% (95% CI: 2.0%-13.0%). Female sex, good WHO performance status (PS), epithelial histology and tri-modal treatment were associated with a favorable prognosis.
MM continuously presents a difficult task diagnostically and therapeutically, and challenges occupational physicians with regard to identification and characterization of asbestos exposure.
PubMed ID
23022841 View in PubMed
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Asthmatic subjects symptomatically worse at work: prevalence and characterization among a general asthma clinic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196578
Source
Chest. 2000 Nov;118(5):1309-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
S M Tarlo
K. Leung
I. Broder
F. Silverman
D L Holness
Author Affiliation
Gage Occupational and Environmental Health Unit, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. susan.tarlo@utoronto.ca
Source
Chest. 2000 Nov;118(5):1309-14
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology
Chi-Square Distribution
Disease Progression
Employment
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the prevalence of a historical occupational component to asthma in an adult asthma clinic and to compare characteristics of asthmatic subjects with and without work-attributed symptoms.
A retrospective review of data obtained from a physician-administered questionnaire, answers to which were obtained at the initial patient visit of asthmatic subjects, and which included specific questions regarding the relationship of work to symptoms. Chart review data were used to supplement information on workplace exposures and investigations.
A university-based secondary- and tertiary-referral asthma clinic.
Seven hundred thirty-one adult asthmatic subjects who were referred for assessment and management of asthma.
Statistical analyses of asthmatic subjects with and without work-attributed symptoms and a determination, from chart review, of the likelihood of causes for symptomatic worsening of asthma at work.
Sixty percent of the patients (435) had adult onset of asthma, among whom 310 patients (71%) were employed at the time of their visit. Fifty-one patients reported their asthma to be worse at work (ie, 16% of adult-onset working asthmatic subjects). Sixteen of these patients (31%) had likely or possible sensitizer-induced occupational asthma (OA), and 49% likely had aggravation of underlying asthma. The other 20% of patients had possible OA or aggravation of underlying asthma at work.
Adult-onset asthmatic subjects commonly report a worsening of asthma at work, more commonly on the basis of likely aggravation of underlying asthma than on the basis of likely or possible OA.
Notes
Comment In: Chest. 2000 Nov;118(5):1232-411083666
PubMed ID
11083679 View in PubMed
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Awkward work postures: association with occupational gender segregation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51876
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2005 May;47(5):381-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Ola Leijon
Eva Bernmark
Lena Karlqvist
Annika Härenstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Norrbacka, Stockholm, Sweden. ola.leijon@sll.se
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2005 May;47(5):381-93
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Biomechanics
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupations - classification
Posture - physiology
Prejudice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Segregation of men and women into different jobs is often cited as one of the most plausible explanations for gender differences in exposure and musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Direct measurements of sitting, arm, and trunk postures were taken with two different technical instruments on 156 subjects (78 matched pairs of one female and one male worker) over one full workday in diverse labor markets. RESULTS: Exposure differences between workers were strongly associated with vertical occupational segregation (measured as level of status/authority). The results showed that this association was strongest for female-dominated jobs. Workers in female-dominated jobs with a low status/authority experienced longer duration in standing posture (P = 0.001), and higher frequency of arm elevation (P = 0.028 and 0.040 for the dominant and the non-dominant arm, respectively). They also had longer duration of work with bent trunk compared to corresponding workers with high status/authority (P = 0.035). The association was less pronounced for male-dominated jobs, and no such association was found for gender-integrated jobs. CONCLUSION: The findings have implications for prevention as well as for future research.
PubMed ID
15828077 View in PubMed
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Back pain and isometric back muscle strength of workers in a Danish factory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252852
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1975;7(3):125-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
O. Find Pedersen
R. Petersen
E. Schack Staffeldt
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1975;7(3):125-8
Date
1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Back - physiology
Back Pain - epidemiology
Body Height
Body Weight
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Muscle Tonus
Obesity
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
105 factory workers (38 females and 67 males) have been questioned about their frequency of back pain. 60% of the females and 61% of the males have previously experienced episodes of back pain. 21% of the females and 37% of the males have been absent from work due to back pain. The incidence of back pain is not related to age, height, sort of work, or isometric muscle strength of the back (IS). For the males the incidence rises with increasing weight, i.e. combination of height and obesity, but is not related to any two single factors. For the females there is no correlation between the incidence of pain and weight. IS is correlated to height and age in the males but not in the females. Standards for IS are presented and suggested as a guide to evaluation of the working capabilities of individual subjects with back pain.
PubMed ID
126491 View in PubMed
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150 records – page 1 of 15.