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Arc and resistance welding and tumours of the endocrine glands: a Swedish case-control study with focus on extremely low frequency magnetic fields.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17070
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 May;62(5):304-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
N. Håkansson
C. Stenlund
P. Gustavsson
C. Johansen
B. Floderus
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. niclas.hakansson@imm.ki.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 May;62(5):304-8
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Endocrine Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Magnetics - adverse effects
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Parathyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Pituitary Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Solvents - toxicity
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Welding
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mechanisms for potential effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on carcinogenesis have not been identified. A potential pathway could be an interaction with the endocrine system. AIMS: To analyse occupational exposure to ELF magnetic fields from welding, and tumours of the endocrine glands. METHODS: This case-control study was based on a cohort with an increased prevalence of high exposed individuals. A total of 174 incident cases of tumours of the endocrine glands, 1985-94, were identified and data were obtained from 140 (80%) of these cases; 1692 controls frequency matched on sex and age were selected, and information on 1306 (77%) individuals was obtained. A short questionnaire was sent to a work administrator at the workplaces of the cases and controls. The exposure assessment was based on questions about job tasks, exposure to different types of welding, and exposure to solvents. RESULTS: There was an overall increased risk for all tumours of the endocrine glands for individuals who had been welding sometime during the follow up. The increased risk was attributable to arc welding; for resistance welding there was no clear evidence of an association. We found an increased risk for the adrenal glands in relation to arc welding, and for the parathyroid glands in relation to both arc welding and resistance welding. An imprecise increase in risk was also noted for tumours of the pituitary gland for arc welding. No confounding effect was found for solvent exposure, and there was no sign of biological interaction. CONCLUSION: The increased risks of endocrine gland tumours related to welding might be explained by exposure to high levels of ELF magnetic fields.
PubMed ID
15837851 View in PubMed
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Source
Radiat Res. 2000 Sep;154(3):237-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
N A Koshurnikova
E S Gilbert
M. Sokolnikov
V F Khokhryakov
S. Miller
D L Preston
S A Romanov
N S Shilnikova
K G Suslova
V V Vostrotin
Author Affiliation
Branch No. 1 of the State Scientific Center "Biophysics Institute", Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region, Russia.
Source
Radiat Res. 2000 Sep;154(3):237-45
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Burden
Bone Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death
Chondrosarcoma - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
England
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Energy
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Osteosarcoma - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Plutonium - adverse effects - urine
Pulmonary Fibrosis - etiology - mortality
Radiation monitoring
Risk
Russia - epidemiology
Sarcoma - epidemiology - etiology
Soft Tissue Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
United States
Abstract
Bone cancer mortality risks were evaluated in 11,000 workers who started working at the "Mayak" Production Association in 1948-1958 and who were exposed to both internally deposited plutonium and external gamma radiation. Comparisons with Russian and U.S. general population rates indicate excess mortality, especially among females, plutonium plant workers, and workers with external doses exceeding 1 Sv. Comparisons within the Mayak worker cohort, which evaluate the role of plutonium body burden with adjustment for cumulative external dose, indicate excess mortality among workers with burdens estimated to exceed 7.4 kBq (relative risk = 7.9; 95% CI = 1.6-32) and among workers in the plutonium plant who did not have routine plutonium monitoring data based on urine measurements (relative risk = 4.1; 95% CI = 1.2-14). In addition, analyses treating the estimated plutonium body burden as a continuous variable indicate increasing risk with increasing burden (P
PubMed ID
10956428 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among 10,211 airline pilots: a Nordic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18311
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2003 Jul;74(7):699-706
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Eero Pukkala
Rafael Aspholm
Anssi Auvinen
Harald Eliasch
Maryanne Gundestrup
Tor Haldorsen
Niklas Hammar
Jón Hrafnkelsson
Pentti Kyyrönen
Anette Linnersjö
Vilhjálmur Rafnsson
Hans Storm
Ulf Tveten
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki, Finland. eero.pukkala@cancer.fi
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2003 Jul;74(7):699-706
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aircraft - statistics & numerical data
Causality
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Commercial airline pilots are exposed to cosmic radiation and other potentially carcinogenic elements during work and leisure activities. HYPOTHESIS: Work-related factors affect cancer pattern of the pilots. METHODS: A cohort of 10,051 male and 160 female airline pilots from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden was followed for cancer incidence through the national cancer registries. There were 177,000 person-years at follow-up, 51,000 of them accumulated after 20 yr since the time of first employment. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were defined as ratios of observed over expected numbers of cases based on national cancer incidence rates. Dose-response analyses were done with Poisson regression method. RESULTS: Among male pilots, there were 466 cases of cancer diagnosed vs. 456 expected. The only significantly increased SIRs concerned skin cancer: melanoma 2.3 (95% CI 1.7-3.0), squamous cell cancer 2.1 (1.7-2.8), and basal cell carcinoma 2.5 (1.9-3.2). The relative risk of skin cancers increased with the time since first employment, the number of flight hours, and the estimated radiation dose. There was an increase in the relative risk of prostate cancer with increasing number of flight hours in long-distance aircraft (p trend 0.01). No increased incidence was found for acute myeloid leukemia or brain cancer which were of interest a priori based on earlier studies. CONCLUSIONS: This large study, based on reliable cancer incidence data, showed an increased incidence of skin cancer. It did not indicate a marked increase in cancer risk attributable to cosmic radiation although some influence of cosmic radiation on skin cancer cannot be entirely excluded.
PubMed ID
12862322 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among Finnish farmers, 1995-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157609
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Feb;34(1):73-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Aarne Laakkonen
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FI-00250 Helsinki, Finland. aarne.laakkonen@kolumbus.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Feb;34(1):73-9
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agriculture
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the cancer risk pattern of male and female Finnish farmers and to define the role of the type of farm production as a risk determinant.
All farmers on 31 December 1978 living on 1 January 1995 were included in the cohort. The data concerning continuation as a farmer and the type of farming was collected from the 31 December 1990 and 1994 farm registries. The observed number of cases in each stratum was divided by the respective expected number based on national incidence rates to calculate the standardized incidence ratio.
The overall cancer incidence was smaller than that of the general population. For most of the cancer sites, the standardized incidence ratios were below 1.0. The lowest rates for farmers continuing to farm were determined for mesothelioma and cancers of the liver, larynx, lung, nose, esophagus, and urinary bladder. The only significantly elevated standardized incidence ratio was that for lip cancer. Permanent beef and dairy farmers had the lowest standardized incidence ratios for overall cancer. Dairy farmers of 1978 who had changed their production type to crop farmers had increased their risk for overall cancer from a standardized incidence ratio of 0.82 to 0.92.
The cancer incidence of Finnish farmers was significantly below the national average. The finding that lung cancer risk was low among dairy farmers but increased with a change to another type of farm production gives some support to the hypothesis that endotoxin exposure may decrease cancer risk.
PubMed ID
18427701 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among male Norwegian asphalt workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18719
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):88-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Britt Grethe Randem
Sverre Langård
Inge Dale
Johny Kongerud
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Oslo, Norway. britt.randem@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):88-95
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Hydrocarbons
Incidence
Inhalation Exposure
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether exposure to bitumen fumes could enhance the risk of cancer in asphalt workers. METHODS: A historical prospective cohort study was performed including 8,763 male asphalt workers from all main asphalt companies in Norway. Name, date of birth, and unique personal identification number, address, job type, and start and stop of employment in specific jobs was obtained for the workers. Information was complied from payroll and personnel records in the companies. The cohort was then linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway, which has complete records of individual cases of cancer in the Norwegian population since 1953. Follow-up was from 1 January 1970 to 31 December 1997. The 5-year age and period adjusted general male population in Norway served as reference population. RESULTS: Lung cancer was found elevated with standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.3 (95% confidence intervals (CI) = 1.1, 1.7) in the overall analysis. Lung cancer was found more elevated in workers first exposed in the 1950s and 1960s and in mastic asphalt workers (SIR = 4.2, 95% CI = 1.2, 10, based on four cases) and pavers (SIR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0, 1.9). There was a deficiency in the incidence of malignant melanoma with 13 cases versus 26 expected. CONCLUSIONS: Risk of lung cancer was found enhanced among the asphalt workers. Some of the enhanced risk could probably be explained by the smoking habits of the workers. Exposure to coal tar may also have contributed to the enhanced risk.
PubMed ID
12494425 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among male pulp and paper workers in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20443
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):99-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
H. Langseth
A. Andersen
Author Affiliation
The Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Epidemiological Cancer Research, Oslo. Hilde.Langseth@kreftreg.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):99-105
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Chemical Industry
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Paper
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The study investigated cancer incidence among 23,718 male pulp and paper workers employed continuously for at least 1 year between 1920 and 1993 in Norway. METHODS: The name, date of birth, personal identification number, dates of hire and termination for all employment periods, specific department, and job categories were registered for each worker. Six subcohorts were established (sulfite mill, sulfate mill, paper mill, maintenance department, administrative staff and other departments). Data on the cohort were linked with data in the Norwegian Cancer Register. The follow-up period for cancer incidence, date of death, or emigration was from 1953 through 1993. RESULTS: An excess incidence of lung cancer was found among both short- and long-term employees [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 1.5, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.13-2.03 and SIR 1.2, 95% CI 1.09-1.34, respectively], especially for workers with the longest latency (SIR 1.3, 95% CI 1.08-1.44) and for sulfite mill workers (SIR 1.5, 95% CI 1.09-1.99). The risk for pleural mesothelioma was also increased (SIR 2.4, 95% CI 1.45-3.75), especially among maintenance workers. The results also showed an increased risk for malignant melanoma (SIR 1.3, 95% CI 1.04-1.60), an unexpected finding. CONCLUSIONS: Almost all the increased risk for lung cancer can be explained by a combination of smoking habits and asbestos use. although an effect of other work-related exposures (sulfur and chloride compounds, wood dust) cannot be excluded. Most of the cases of pleural mesothelioma occurred in departments where asbestos was used. There is no clear explanation for the excess of malignant melanoma, and the finding may be a chance occurrence.
PubMed ID
10817374 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among marine engineers, a population-based study (Iceland).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18488
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Feb;14(1):29-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Vilhjalmur Rafnsson
Patrick Sulem
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Iceland, Soltun 1, 105 Reykjavik, Iceland. vilraf@hi.is
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Feb;14(1):29-35
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Engineering
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Marine engineers are in their occupation exposed to different chemicals, organic solvents, exhaust gases, oils, and petroleum products, and were formerly exposed to asbestos. The aim was to study the cancer pattern, with particular attention to lung and bladder cancer, in an Icelandic cohort of marine engineers, indirectly controlling for their smoking habits. METHODS: A cohort of 6603 male marine engineers was followed up from 1955 to 1998, a total of 167,715 person-years. The cohort was record linked by the engineers' personal identification numbers to population-based registers containing the vital and emigration status and cancer diagnosis. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for all cancers and different cancer sites in relation to different lag time and year of graduation. Information on smoking habits was obtained by administering a questionnaire to a sample of the cohort (n = 1,501). RESULTS: In the total cohort 810 cancers were observed, whereas 794 were expected (SIR 1.0, 95% CI 1.0-1.1), and significantly increased risk of stomach cancer (SIR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.5) and lung cancer (SIR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.5) was found. Increased risk of all cancers (SIR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.3), stomach cancer (SIR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-1.9), lung cancer (SIR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2-1.8), pleural mesothelioma (SIR 4.8, 95% CI 1.3-12.3), and urinary bladder cancer (SIR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.8) were observed when a 40-year lag time was applied. The engineers' smoking habits were similar to those in a sample of the general population. The predictive value for lung cancer was 1.03. CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk for mesothelioma is possibly attributable to the previous asbestos exposure. The excess of lung cancer could also be related to asbestos exposure. The high incidence of stomach cancer, lung cancer, and bladder cancer may be related to exposure to chemical risk factors, such as oils and petroleum products, as confounding due to smoking seems to be ruled out. In the light of the limited exposure information in the present study the importance of the different occupational exposures needs to be evaluated in further studies.
PubMed ID
12708722 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among members of the Norwegian trade union of insulation workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17975
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;46(1):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Bente Ulvestad
Kristina Kjaerheim
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Gunnar Mowe
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Montebello, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;46(1):84-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Humans
Incidence
Labor Unions
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Insulation work has been described as an occupation with high exposure to asbestos. A cohort of members of the Norwegian Trade Union of Insulation Workers (n = 1116), hired between 1930 and 1975, was established. During 2002, the cohort was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of pleural mesothelioma was 12.9 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.0-24.6). Two cases with peritoneal mesotheliomas were found (SIR, 14.8; 95% CI = 1.8-53.4). The SIR of lung cancer was 3.0 (95% CI = 2.3-3.8). Four cases of lung cancer were observed among cork workers without any exposure to asbestos, but to cork dust and tar smoke (SIR, 5.3; 95% CI = 1.5-13.6). Our study showed a high risk of mesothelioma and an elevated risk of lung cancer among members of the Trade Union of Insulation Workers.
PubMed ID
14724482 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among Norwegian airline pilots.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20442
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
T. Haldorsen
J B Reitan
U. Tveten
Author Affiliation
The Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo. th@kreftreg.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):106-11
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aviation - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Probability
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: In this retrospective cohort study, the cancer incidence of commercial pilots was studied to determine whether exposure at work has any influence on the incidence of cancer. METHODS: The cohort was established from the files of the Civil Aviation Administration and included people who had valid licenses as commercial pilots between 1946 and 1994. Basic data about their flight careers were recorded, and exposure to cosmic radiation was estimated. The cohort was linked to the Cancer Register of Norway. The observed number of cases was compared with that expected based on national rates. RESULTS: A group of 3701 male pilots was followed over 70 560 person-years. There were 200 cases of cancer versus 188.8 expected, with a standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.06 and a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 0.92-1.22. No significant decreased risk was found for any cancer site. Excess risks were found for malignant melanoma (22 cases SIR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.7) and nonmelanoma skin cancer (14 cases, SIR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.0). For malignant melanoma, there was a significant trend for the SIR by cumulative dose. CONCLUSIONS: For most cancer sites, the incidence among pilots did not deviate from that of the general population and could not be related to block hours of flight time or dose. It seems more likely that the excess risks of malignant melanoma and skin cancer are explained by factors related to life-style rather than by conditions at work.
PubMed ID
10817375 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence and magnetic field exposure in industries using resistance welding in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19030
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2002 Jul;59(7):481-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
N. Håkansson
B. Floderus
P. Gustavsson
C. Johansen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. niclas.hakansson@imm.ki.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2002 Jul;59(7):481-6
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Welding
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate cancer incidence in workers exposed to high levels of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF). METHODS: A cohort based on the engineering industry was established. Industries assumed to use resistance welding in production were chosen in order to increase the prevalence of high exposed subjects and to reduce the influence of confounding factors. All men and women employed in these branches during 1985-94 were selected, 537 692 men and 180 529 women. Occupation, based on census information from 1980, 1985, and 1990, was linked to a job exposure matrix on ELF-MF. Four exposure groups were used by stratifying on mean workday ELF-MF exposure, using the lowest exposure group as reference. Cancer incidence was obtained by linkage to the Swedish Cancer Registry. RESULTS: Men in the very high exposure group showed an increased incidence of tumours of the kidney, pituitary gland, and biliary passages and liver; for these cancer sites an exposure-response relation was indicated. Women in the very high exposure group showed an increased incidence of astrocytoma I-IV, with a clear exposure-response pattern. An association was suggested in the high exposure group only, for cancer of the corpus uteri and multiple myeloma. Decreased risks in the very high exposure group among men were found for cancer of the colon and connective tissue/muscle. CONCLUSIONS: The results on cancer of the liver, kidney, and pituitary gland among men are in accordance with previous observations. Regarding brain tumours and leukaemia, the outcome for women provided further support of an association. The hypothesis of a biological mechanism involving the endocrine system was partly supported.
PubMed ID
12107298 View in PubMed
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84 records – page 1 of 9.