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A 12 year prospective study of circulatory disease among Danish shift workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82071
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Tüchsen F.
Hannerz H.
Burr H.
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. ft@ami.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies of the risk of heart disease after shift work reached different estimates and review authors disagree about the validity of some of the studies. A cross sectional study showed that shift workers had a higher prevalence of nearly every unfavourable work environment factor investigated. Conflicts at work and low decision latitude were more frequent among shift workers, and all-day walking or standing work and part-time jobs were more often found among female shift workers. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risk of circulatory disease in a prospective follow up of a representative sample of gainfully employed Danes, considering known or suspected confounding factors. METHODS: A cohort of 5517 people who were gainfully employed in 1990 were followed up for all hospital treatments due to circulatory diseases (390-458, ICD-8; I00-I99, ICD-10) from 1991 to 2002 inclusive. A log linear Poisson regression model was applied to control confounding factors and calculate the relative risk for 927 men and women working nights, evenings, or other non-day shifts compared to 4579 day workers. RESULTS: Non-day workers compared to day workers had a relative risk (RR) for all circulatory diseases of 1.31 (95% CI 1.06-1.63). Without control for BMI and smoking, the RR estimate was 1.33 (95% CI 1.07-1.65). For a subgroup of workers with at least three years' seniority, the RR was 1.40 (95% CI 1.09-1.81). The population based aetiological fraction of shift work was estimated to 5%. CONCLUSION: This study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that shift work carries an excess risk of circulatory diseases.
PubMed ID
16735480 View in PubMed
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A 13-year cohort study of musculoskeletal disorders treated in an autoplant, on-site physiotherapy clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160671
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2007 Dec;17(4):610-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Jackie Sadi
Joy C MacDermid
Bert Chesworth
Trevor Birmingham
Author Affiliation
School of Physical Therapy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada. jsadi2@uwo.ca
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2007 Dec;17(4):610-22
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Automobiles
Female
Humans
Industry
Male
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Occupational Health
Ontario - epidemiology
Physical Therapy Modalities
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the rate and distribution of treatment visits provided in an on-site, automotive plant, physiotherapy clinic over a 13-year period.
A retrospective cohort study was conducted using data collected at an on-site physiotherapy clinic (1990-2002, 65,977 visits; n = 2,636 workers).
The average age of workers was 43 +/- 9 years; most remained at work (85%) when treated. Disorders most commonly affected the shoulder, lumbar, and cervical regions; the median number of visits for these was 7, 6, and 5, respectively. Elbow disorders occurred commonly only for work-related complaints and required a median of eight visits. Rate of utilization was higher for women, with 47% of the plant's female workers attending physiotherapy in 1 year. Women had higher rates of cervical spine (12 vs. 22%) and wrist (5 vs. 10%) disorders. The two most common causes of injury reported by workers with an industrial injury were "frank injury arising out of normal employment" (51%) and "gradual onset/no frank injury" (37%). The diagnosis most often reported by the physiotherapist after initial assessment was "strain" which was similar for both industrial (43%) and non-industrial (49%) injuries. The six main departments in this automotive plant account for 93% of all industrial injuries reported. Final Assembly accounted for the largest number and highest rate of injury, although shift variability was noted in utilization rates (13 vs. 26%), despite the same tasks, shift schedules, and demographics. Although there was no control group, the number of visits to discharge was lower than reported in the literature for off-site physical therapy; there was a large reduction in claims (441-275) following introduction of the clinic and reduced duration/costs of lost time were identified by the employer as a rationale to continue and enhance the service over time.
On-site physiotherapy services can provide early, cost-effective management of WRMSD in the automotive sector. Service utilization reflects the influence of gender, job task, and shift-dynamics on rates and location of WRMSD.
PubMed ID
17955347 View in PubMed
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A 15-year prospective study of shift work and disability pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93753
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tüchsen F.
Christensen K B
Lund T.
Feveile H.
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ftu@nrcwe.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Retirement
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the hazard ratio for disability pension associated with shift work. METHODS: Cohorts of shift and day workers were identified in three waves of the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study and followed up for incidence of disability pension in a national register of social transfer payment. A total of 3980 female and 4025 male employees were included in the cohorts. Information about shift work status, age, smoking habits, body mass index and ergonomic work environment were updated according to responses in subsequent waves of the survey when possible. Respondents reporting shift work were classified as shift workers in the following waves as well. Respondents were followed in the register from the time of first interview and were censored at the time of their 60th birthday, emigration, death or end of follow-up (18 June 2006). The authors used the Cox proportional hazards model to estimate hazard ratios for incidence of disability pension and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The authors observed 253 new disability pensions among women and 173 among men during 56 903 and 57 886 person-years at risk respectively, Among women, shift work predicted disability after adjustment for age, general health and socioeconomic status HR 1.39 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.82). After further adjustment for body mass index, smoking habits, socioeconomic status and ergonomic exposures the association remained statistically significant HR 1.34 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.75). Shift work was not associated with disability among men. CONCLUSION: Shift work might be moderately associated with disability pension among women; however, more powerful studies are needed to establish the possible association.
PubMed ID
18198201 View in PubMed
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[25-year experience of Sverdlovsk regional occupational center on the basis of the research institute].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198488
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(3):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
S G Domnin
E P Zhovtiak
A G Gol'del'man
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(3):30-3
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health Services - supply & distribution - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Sverdlovsk Regional Occupational Center based on the Research Institute has highly qualified staff, incorporates ambulatory department, hospital with modern diagnostic and therapeutic equipment. The Center performs multiple tasks, being an organizational and methodic, diagnostic and occupational examination institution using up-to-date advances in industrial medicine.
PubMed ID
10826371 View in PubMed
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Abdominal symptoms among sewage workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10795
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 May;48(4):251-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
L. Friis
L. Agréus
C. Edling
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Lennart.Friis@arbmed.uas.se
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 May;48(4):251-3
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diarrhea - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nausea - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Peptic Ulcer - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sanitary Engineering
Sewage
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of abdominal symptoms and the abdominal medical history among sewage workers. 142 male sewage workers and 137 male referents in 11 Swedish municipalities were addressed with a questionnaire about abdominal symptoms, medical history, occupational history and life style factors. The sewage workers suffered less from nausea [adjusted odds ratio (adjOR) = 0.18, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 0.04-0.84] than the referents. There was no significant difference in the three months prevalence of diarrhoea (adjOR = 1.7, 95% Cl = 0.79-3.4), dyspepsia (adjOR = 0.85, 95% Cl = 0.49-1.5) or irritable bowel syndrome (adjOR = 1.4, 95% Cl = 0.53-3.5). The sewage workers were affected more often by peptic ulcers during their present jobs than the referents, although the increased risk was not significant (adjOR = 1.4, 95% Cl = 0.31-6.1). The odds ratios were adjusted for age, use of tobacco products and alcohol consumption. The conclusion of this study was that sewage workers are less affected by nausea than comparable referents.
PubMed ID
9800423 View in PubMed
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[About life, work and health problems of fishermen employed by PPP and H "Dalmor" SA., fishing at the Sea of Okhotsk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216598
Source
Med Pr. 1995;46(3):309-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

Absence attributed to incapacity and occupational disease/accidents among female and male workers in the fish-processing industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203445
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 Jul;48(5):289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
B. Pålsson
U. Strömberg
K. Ohlsson
S. Skerfving
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 Jul;48(5):289-95
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Female
Fishes
Food-Processing Industry
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Sick-leave between 1984 and 1989 was higher among both female (n = 515) and male (n = 304) fish-processing workers [observed/expected (O/E) 2.24 and 1.69, respectively] than among non-exposed groups (0.62 and 0.89). Diagnoses in the musculoskeletal system dominated (i.e., neck/upper limbs; females, exposed vs. non-exposed workers: 30 vs. 12%; males: 11 vs. 5.8%). In subjects who left employment, the O/E-ratio decreased (females: 3.02 vs. 1.55; males: 2.40 vs. 1.55). Among those women hired before the start of the observation period, exposed subjects had higher frequencies of sick-leave than non-exposed, for both total illness and musculoskeletal diagnoses. In the men, there were corresponding differences, though not fully statistically significant. Reported occupational diseases [O/E: females: 4.5; (95% confidence interval) CI = 3.2-6.1; males: 2.3; CI = 1.3-3.9] and accidents (females: 4.3; CI = 3.0-5.9; males: 1.8; CI = 1.2-2.7) were also higher in female than in male fish-processing workers, and much higher than in non-exposed workers. In conclusion, work in the fish-processing industry was associated with increased frequencies of sick-leave, especially because of diagnoses of the musculoskeletal system, and occupational disorders and accidents, in particular among female workers.
PubMed ID
9876411 View in PubMed
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Absence experience of career firefighters reaching mandatory retirement age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223027
Source
J Occup Med. 1992 Oct;34(10):1018-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
T L Guidotti
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
J Occup Med. 1992 Oct;34(10):1018-22
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Age Factors
Aging
Fires - prevention & control
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Muscular Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Retirement
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
PubMed ID
1403190 View in PubMed
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[Absenteeism as a predictor of severe morbidity. A double case-control study (myocardial infarction and industrial accident) in a large company of the Quebec Province].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237596
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1986;34(4-5):252-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
W. Dab
J. Rochon
L. Bernard
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1986;34(4-5):252-60
Date
1986
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Accidents, Occupational
Adult
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Quebec
Risk
Abstract
Are absenteeism indicators usefull as predictor of serious morbidity in a working population? To seek an answer was the objective of a double case-control study carried out in a large company (17000 workers) of Quebec Province. In the first study, 64 cases of myocardial infarction (incidence density = 1.66% +/- 0.35) were compared with 64 controls matched for sex, age and type of work. In the second one, 142 cases of labor accident were compared with 142 controls sampled in a similar way. Absenteeism frequency and length were analysed during the period of 6 to 12 years prior to the onset of the health problem. Ratios were calculated on an individual basis for all causes of absence and for sick leave; they were adjusted for length of service. A four classes interval scale was used for the comparison. An excess of absence length exists in the two studies. The excess is not significant for the myocardial infarction cases (+ 33%, with a statistical power = 51%). It is significant for the labor accident cases (+ 52%, p less than 0.01). The corresponding odds ratio calculated in reference to the lowest absence group were 2.4 (0.9-6.6) and 2.7 (1.5-4.9). The cumulative absence length can be considered as a predictor of serious disease. A conceptual framework of the relationship between absence and natural disease history is presented. The epidemiological approach to the phenomenon of absence is certainly usefull in spite of the controversy underlined by the social sciences.
PubMed ID
3823517 View in PubMed
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[Accumulation of heavy metals in biologic materials of mining workers and of nearby population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176713
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(11):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
M A Mukasheva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(11):38-40
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The article contains results concerning spectral analysis of biologic materials (blood and hair) for heavy metals content. These results helped to reveal health risk factors for workers engaged into chromium ores extraction and for nearby residents.
PubMed ID
15636126 View in PubMed
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2362 records – page 1 of 237.