Skip header and navigation

Refine By

72 records – page 1 of 8.

[A case of mass legionellosis infection in an enterprise of the rubber technology industry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231825
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1989;(12):10-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
Iu I Musiichuk
A A Penknovich
I M Suvorov
T I Sushentsova
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1989;(12):10-4
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Conditioning
Diagnosis, Differential
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Legionnaires' Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Recurrence
Rubber
Russia - epidemiology
Ventilation
Abstract
On the basis of the analysis of the sanitary and hygienic conditions, epidemiology of a mass disease, clinical picture of the disease during a 6-month trial period the problems of differentiated diagnosis of infectious and toxic processes, examination of capacity for work, the course of diseases were studied in 219 workers who had had legionellosis. The participation of various specialists in the analysis of analogous cases at the enterprises with chemical environmental contamination and developed systems of air conditioning was considered necessary.
PubMed ID
2534104 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airflow limitation and changes in pulmonary function among bleachery workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174038
Source
Eur Respir J. 2005 Jul;26(1):133-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
A J Mehta
P K Henneberger
K. Torén
A-C Olin
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2005 Jul;26(1):133-9
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Airway Resistance
Case-Control Studies
Chlorine Compounds - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Industry
Lung Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Oxides - adverse effects
Ozone - adverse effects
Paper
Probability
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk assessment
Spirometry - methods
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated whether chronic airflow limitation and rapid decline in pulmonary function were associated with peak exposures to ozone and other irritant gases in pulp mills. Bleachery workers potentially exposed to irritant gassings (n = 178) from three Swedish pulp mills, and a comparison group of workers not exposed to irritant gassings (n = 54) from two paper mills, were studied. Baseline surveys occurred in 1995-1996, with follow-up surveys in 1998-1999. Participants performed spirometry and answered questions regarding ozone, chlorine dioxide (ClO2), and sulphur dioxide (SO2) gassings. From regression models controlling for potential confounders, declines in both the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (-24 mL x yr(-1)) and the forced vital capacity (FVC) (-19 mL x yr(-1)) were associated with ClO2/SO2 gassings. At follow-up, the prevalence of chronic airflow limitation (i.e. FEV1/FVC less than the lower limit of normal) was elevated for participants with only pre-baseline ozone gassings and with both pre-baseline and interval ozone gassings, after controlling for potential confounders. These findings suggest that obstructive effects among bleachery workers are associated with ozone gassings, and that adverse effects on spirometry might also accompany chlorine dioxide/sulphur dioxide gassings. Peak exposures to irritant gases in pulp mills should be prevented.
PubMed ID
15994400 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel: trichloramine exposure, exhaled NO and protein profiling of nasal lavage fluids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123142
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):571-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Louise Fornander
Bijar Ghafouri
Mats Lindahl
Pål Graff
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):571-80
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Biological Markers - metabolism
Chlorides - adverse effects - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Female
Humans
Immunoblotting
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Lavage Fluid - chemistry
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Nitrogen Compounds - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Prevalence
Proteome - metabolism
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Risk factors
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Sweden - epidemiology
Swimming Pools
Abstract
Occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel was investigated. The aims of this study were to assess trichloramine exposure levels and exhaled nitric oxide in relation to the prevalence of airway symptoms in swimming pool facilities and to determine protein effects in the upper respiratory tract.
The presence of airway symptoms related to work was examined in 146 individuals working at 46 indoor swimming pool facilities. Levels of trichloramine, as well as exhaled nitric oxide, were measured in five facilities with high prevalence of airway irritation and four facilities with no airway irritation among the personnel. Nasal lavage fluid was collected, and protein profiles were determined by a proteomic approach.
17 % of the swimming pool personnel reported airway symptoms related to work. The levels of trichloramine in the swimming pool facilities ranged from 0.04 to 0.36 mg/m(3). There was no covariance between trichloramine levels, exhaled nitric oxide and prevalence of airway symptoms. Protein profiling of the nasal lavage fluid showed that the levels alpha-1-antitrypsin and lactoferrin were significantly higher, and S100-A8 was significantly lower in swimming pool personnel.
This study confirms the occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel. Our results indicate altered levels of innate immunity proteins in the upper airways that may pose as potential biomarkers. However, swimming pool facilities with high prevalence of airway irritation could not be explained by higher trichloramine exposure levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the environmental factors in indoor swimming pools that cause airway problems and affect the immune system.
PubMed ID
22729567 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of primary disability in determining the connection between disease and occupation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128858
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2011;(9):13-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
O A Ishteriakova
Z M Berkheeva
N Kh Amirov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2011;(9):13-8
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - rehabilitation
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
Average age at first disablement status by primary diagnosis of occupational diseases reaches 51.8 +/- 4.1 years. Medical and social examination proves II grade disablement in 15% of individuals. Disablement due to occupational diseases is characterized by high stability (60.5 out of 100 repeatedly examined per year). The authors revealed statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
22164994 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An anamnestic method for studying the cause-effect connections between the status of public health and manufacturing, ecological and social factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216168
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1995;(11):40-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
V A Voronin
G A Sorokin
V P Plekhanov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1995;(11):40-2
Date
1995
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ecology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking - methods - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Public Health
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The authors elaborated a medical and ecologic questionnaire for specific history. The questionnaire was applied to express-evaluation of public health state and environmental factors in the certain settlement. The health state was proved to be influenced significantly by occupational conditions, hardiness and intensity of work, psychologic climate. The most hazardous environmental factors are: unsatisfactory quality of drinkable water, air pollution and traffic noise. The lifestyle of the population examined is strongly associated with bad habits (smoking, short sleep, alcohol abuse).
PubMed ID
8689078 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An evaluation of acute effects of sulfur compounds for the human organism in natural gas fields emergencies (review)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184551
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 May-Jun;(3):34-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L R Salikhova
V V Zebseev
A I Karpov
M N Eremin
A V Gorlov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 May-Jun;(3):34-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Acute Disease
Fossil Fuels
Health status
Humans
Industry
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Sulfur Compounds - adverse effects
Abstract
A trend towards a growing number of emergency situations at industrial enterprises has been recently traced throughout the world. The main reasons of such phenomenon are: a comprehensive use of highly dangerous technologies and materials; large-scale violations of the operational rules and norms; and an inadmissibly high wear-and-tear of the main production funds in economic branches with extra risk. The world experience is indicative of a high degree of danger related with exploiting the natural-gas fields with a high content of sulfur compounds. The occurrence of emergency situations in the mentioned fields is accompanied by development of acute and sub-acute toxic effects in the workers and population. It necessitated, recently, an elaboration of a concept of a relative safety, in view of an unfavorable impact produced by chemical substances in emergencies, and an elaboration of methods applicable to the evaluation of emergency regulations.
PubMed ID
12852038 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Aspects of silicotuberculosis course in workers of highly aluminous mullite refractories].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194282
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(3):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
B B Fishman
V A Medik
V R Veber
O V Bastsrykina
A A Prindik
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(3):29-34
Date
2001
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aluminum - adverse effects
Aluminum Silicates - adverse effects
Chemical Industry
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Lung - radiography
Male
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Silicotuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The article covers differential diagnostic features of pulmonary tuberculosis and pneumoconiosis in workers engaged into mullite refractories production. The authors suggest that the disease courses as a new form of lung disorder--mullitosis.
PubMed ID
11419323 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Assessment of causal relationship in work-related pulmonary diseases. An epidemiological approach].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212618
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 28;116(6):736-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-1996
Author
H. Kjuus
O A Hauge
J. Kongerud
T B Aasen
Author Affiliation
Statens arbeidsmiljøinstitutt, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 28;116(6):736-8
Date
Feb-28-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disability Evaluation
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
A competent assessment of causal relationships in the case of work-related lung disorders depends on correct diagnosis, a detailed occupational history and updated epidemiological knowledge about causal relationships, obtained from the literature. Assessments for purposes of compensation demand, in addition, an explicit choice of methods for calculating causes, before a meaningful attempt can be made to weight the various factors in and outside the working environment. If adequate epidemiological knowledge is available, the causal probability, based on the etiological fraction among the exposed persons (attributable risk) may be a useful tool for apportioning the different causal factors.
PubMed ID
8644076 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of indoor air problems at work with a questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182271
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;61(1):33-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
K. Reijula
C. Sundman-Digert
Author Affiliation
Uusimaa Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. kari.reijula@occuphealth.fi
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;61(1):33-8
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sick Building Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
To assess the extent of indoor air problems in office environments in Finland.
Complaints and symptoms related to the indoor environment experienced by office workers were collected from 122 workplaces in 1996-99 by using the modified Indoor Air Questionnaire established by the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. Altogether 11 154 employees took part in the survey.
The most common problems were dry air (35% of the respondents), stuffy air (34%), dust or dirt in the indoor environment (25%), and draught (22%). The most common work related symptoms were irritated, stuffy, or runny nose (20%), itching, burning, or irritation of the eyes (17%), and fatigue (16%). Women reported indoor air problems and work related symptoms more often than men. Allergic persons and smokers reported indoor air problems more often, and experienced work related symptoms more often than non-allergic persons and non-smokers.
The complaints and work related symptoms associated with indoor air problems were common in office workers. The present questionnaire is a suitable tool for the occupational health personnel in investigating indoor air problems and the data of the survey can be used as a reference when the results of a survey at work are being analysed.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1995 Feb;40(4):491-5027725123
Cites: Indoor Air. 1999 Jun;9(2):92-10210390934
Cites: Zentralbl Hyg Umweltmed. 1999 Aug;202(2-4):235-4110507131
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Apr 15;141(8):755-657709918
Cites: Indoor Air. 2002 Mar;12(1):33-4611951709
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Dec 8;289(6458):1573-56439323
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 1987;31(4A):493-5043439759
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2001 Sep;91(9):1416-811527773
PubMed ID
14691270 View in PubMed
Less detail

72 records – page 1 of 8.