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73 records – page 1 of 8.

An improved estimate of the quantitative relationship between polycyclic hydrocarbons and lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147906
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2009 Nov;66(11):716-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Dario Mirabelli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, University of Turin and CPO Piemonte, Via Santena 7, 10126 Turin, Italy. dario.mirabelli@cpo.it
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2009 Nov;66(11):716-7
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Polycyclic Compounds - toxicity
Quebec - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Occup Environ Med. 2009 Nov;66(11):740-619546103
PubMed ID
19837902 View in PubMed
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Arsenic exposure and mortality: a case-referent study from a Swedish copper smelter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27598
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1978 Feb;35(1):8-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1978
Author
O. Axelson
E. Dahlgren
C D Jansson
S O Rehnlund
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1978 Feb;35(1):8-15
Date
Feb-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arsenic - adverse effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - mortality
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Sweden
Abstract
An increased mortality from lung cancer, cardiovascular disease, haematolymphatic malignancy and cirrhosis of the liver has been reported among smelter workers and others exposed to arsenic. This study uses the case-referent (case-control) technique and is concerned with workers in a copper smelter in a complex work environment, characterised by the presence of trivalent arsenic in combination with sulphur dioxide and copper, and also with other agents. Lung cancer mortality was found to be increased about five-fold and cardiovascular disease about two-fold, showing a dose-response relationship to arsenic exposure. Mortality from malignant blood disease (leukaemia and myeloma) and cirrhosis of the liver was also slightly increased. This mortality pattern among the smelter workers is consistent with earlier reports. An increased mortality from cardiovascular disease in this type of industry is of particular interest as it has been reported only once before.
PubMed ID
629894 View in PubMed
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Cancer and occupational exposure to pentachlorophenol and tetrachlorophenol (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168759
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Aug;17(6):749-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Paul A Demers
Hugh W Davies
Melissa C Friesen
Clyde Hertzman
Aleck Ostry
Ruth Hershler
Kay Teschke
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. pdemers@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Aug;17(6):749-58
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Chlorophenols - toxicity
Follow-Up Studies
Fungicides, Industrial - toxicity
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Multiple Myeloma - chemically induced - mortality
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pentachlorophenol - toxicity
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The objective of this study is to assess the carcinogenicity of pentachlorophenol and tetrachlorophenol using data from the BC sawmill workers cohort study.
The cohort consisted of 27,464 men employed by 14 sawmills for 1 year or more between 1950 and 1995. Fatal (1950-1995) and incident (1969-1995) cancers were identified using national registries. Plant records and systematic interviews with senior employees were used to estimate dermal exposure. Comparisons were made with the general BC population and dose-response relationships were assessed using Poisson regression.
There were 1,495 fatal cancer and 2,571 incident cancers. There were no large or statistically significant excesses of any of the specific cancers were observed compared to the general population. Internal analyses showed strong dose-response relationships for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and kidney cancer. These relationships were strongest when exposure was restricted to pentachlorophenol. The strength of the dose-response increased when exposure was lagged by 20 years.
Dermal exposure to pentachlorophenol was associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and kidney cancer, but not with other cancers of a priori interest.
PubMed ID
16783603 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among workers exposed to radon and thoron daughters at a niobium mine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26650
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1985 Feb;11(1):7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
H M Solli
A. Andersen
E. Stranden
S. Langård
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1985 Feb;11(1):7-13
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology - mortality
Niobium - poisoning
Norway
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Radon - poisoning
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Smoking
Thorium - poisoning
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of cancer among 318 male employees of a niobium mining company which was only operated between 1951 and 1965. Many of the workers, especially underground miners, were exposed to the daughters of radon and thoron and also to thorium. The accumulated doses to the workers from short-lived radon and thoron daughters in the mine atmosphere were assessed to be relatively low; up to 300 working-level months. During the follow-up period 1953-1981, 24 new cases of cancer were observed compared to an expected number of 22.8. Twelve cases of lung cancer had occurred versus 3.0 expected. Among the 77 miners, 9 cases of lung cancer were observed against 0.8 expected. Associations between the occurrence of lung cancer and exposure to alpha radiation and smoking were found. For the radon and thoron daughter exposure, about 50 excess cases per million person-years at risk per working-level month were observed.
PubMed ID
2986282 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence and mortality of patients with suspected solvent-related disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23050
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1995 Oct;21(5):362-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
K. Berlin
C. Edling
B. Persson
G. Ahlborg
L. Hillert
B. Högstedt
I. Lundberg
B G Svensson
G. Thiringer
P. Orbaek
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1995 Oct;21(5):362-7
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solvents - adverse effects
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--The aim of this study was to study the incidence of cancer and deaths from cancer and other diseases among patients referred to the 11 clinics of occupational medicine in Sweden between 1967 and 1987 for examination because of exposure to organic solvents. METHODS--The cohort comprised 5791 persons, 5283 men and 508 women. Information about cancer incidence and causes of death was collected from the Cancer Register of the National Board of Health and Welfare and the National Death Register of Statistics Sweden, respectively. The expected values were calculated from the national death rates and incidence rates of cancer. RESULTS--The overall mortality rate was close to expected, but the mortality rate was decreased for diseases of the circulatory system [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) 0.7, 95% confidence limit (95% CI) 0.5-0.9] and increased for suicide (SMR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.2). The total cancer incidence was slightly elevated [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 1.2, 95% CI 0.99-1.4], and some specific cancer sites showed an increased incidence, although the lower confidence limits surpassed one. Malignancies of the lymphohematopoietic system and cancer of the uterine cervix had an increased risk (SIR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.2, and SIR 3.7, 95% CI 2.2-6.2, respectively). Patients with presumerably high solvent exposure had an SIR of 1.4 for all malignancies (95% CI 0.9-2.1) and those with presumerably low exposure had an SIR of 1.1 (95% CI 0.9-1.4). CONCLUSIONS--The study showed an increased risk for malignancies of the hematopoietic system and the uterine cervix among patients originally examined with regard to solvent-induced disorders. There was also an increased risk of suicide and a decreased risk of death from diseases of the circulatory system. There was no increased risk for deaths from mental or neurological disorders.
PubMed ID
8571092 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality (1965-77) in relation to diesel fume and coal exposure in a cohort of retired railway workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241865
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1983 Jun;70(6):1015-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1983
Author
G R Howe
D. Fraser
J. Lindsay
B. Presnal
S Z Yu
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1983 Jun;70(6):1015-9
Date
Jun-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos
Canada
Coal
Computers
Fuel Oils
Humans
Male
Methods
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Probability
Railroads
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Retirement
Abstract
A cohort study of 43,826 male pensioners of the Canadian National Railway Company was conducted. The cause of death of 17,838 pensioners who died between 1965 and 1977 was ascertained by computerized record linkage to the Canadian national mortality data base. The main finding was an elevated risk of lung cancer for those employed in occupations involving exposure to diesel fumes and coal dust, with highly significant dose-response relationships observed. That such association may be due in part to smoking cannot be excluded; but in view of the widespread exposure to diesel fumes, the finding warrants further investigation. The present study also demonstrated the utility and feasibility of large-scale occupational cohort studies conducted with the use of computerized record linkage to national mortality records.
PubMed ID
6574269 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality among European asphalt workers: an international epidemiological study. I. Results of the analysis based on job titles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18721
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):18-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Paolo Boffetta
Igor Burstyn
Timo Partanen
Hans Kromhout
Ole Svane
Sverre Langård
Bengt Järvholm
Rainer Frentzel-Beyme
Timo Kauppinen
Isabelle Stücker
Judith Shaham
Dick Heederik
Wolfgang Ahrens
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Sylvie Cenée
Gilles Ferro
Pirjo Heikkilä
Mariëtte Hooiveld
Christoffer Johansen
Britt G Randem
Walter Schill
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Cancer Epidemiology, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. boffetta@iarc.fr
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):18-27
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrocarbons
Inhalation Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Inhalation of bitumen fumes is potentially carcinogenic to humans. METHODS: We conducted a study of 29,820 male workers exposed to bitumen in road paving, asphalt mixing and roofing, 32,245 ground and building construction workers unexposed to bitumen, and 17,757 workers not classifiable as bitumen workers, from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, the Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden, with mortality follow-up during 1953-2000. We calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on national mortality rates. Poisson regression analyses compared mortality of bitumen workers to that of building or ground construction workers. RESULTS: The overall mortality was below expectation in the total cohort (SMR 0.92, 95% CI 0.90-0.94) and in each group of workers. The SMR of lung cancer was higher among bitumen workers (1.17, 95% CI 1.04-1.30) than among workers in ground and building construction (SMR 1.01, 95% CI 0.89-1.15). In the internal comparison, the relative risk (RR) of lung cancer mortality among bitumen workers was 1.09 (95% CI 0.89-1.34). The results of cancer of the head and neck were similar to those of lung cancer, based on a smaller number of deaths. There was no suggestion of an association between employment in bitumen jobs and other cancers. CONCLUSIONS: European workers employed in road paving, asphalt mixing and other jobs entailing exposure to bitumen fume might have experienced a small increase in lung cancer mortality risk, compared to workers in ground and building construction. However, exposure assessment was limited and confounding from exposure to carcinogens in other industries, tobacco smoking, and other lifestyle factors cannot be ruled out.
PubMed ID
12494418 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality among female and male workers occupationally exposed to inorganic lead in the printing industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130056
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2012 Feb;69(2):87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Svetlana A Ilychova
David G Zaridze
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Russian N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2012 Feb;69(2):87-92
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Lead - adverse effects
Male
Metals, Heavy - adverse effects
Moscow - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations
Pancreatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Printing
Publishing
Sex Factors
Abstract
Evaluation of the carcinogenicity of lead for humans has been based primarily on the results of studies on occupationally exposed men, although gender differences in lead metabolism have been reported. In addition, most of the previous studies have been limited by a failure to identify and control for co-exposures to other known occupational carcinogens. The present study follows an industrial cohort of workers, mostly women, with moderate lead exposure and no confounding by other occupational exposures.
Workers, employed at least 2 years between 1950 and 1978 in manual and mechanical (linotype) typesetting and type foundries in 27 printing plants in Moscow, were included in the cohort, which comprised 1423 men and 3102 women. The cohort was followed up during 1979-2003 and contributed 93,682 person-years of observation. Follow-up was 97.7% complete. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and 95% CIs, based on mortality rates of the Moscow general population and adjusted for gender, age and calendar time, were calculated for the total cohort as well as subcohorts stratified by various exposure parameters.
Among women, mortality from all causes, circulatory diseases and all cancers combined was lower than that in the Moscow general population and was similar across work groups. Among men, there was excess overall mortality, mainly due to increased mortality from ischaemic heart disease. For both sexes, no significant excess risk for any cancer site was observed, although some dose-response patterns were found. In the overall cohort, mortality from cancers of the kidney and pancreas increased up to twofold in the highest tertile of cumulative lead exposure based on duration and a relative ranking of the three subcohorts (9 deaths; SMR=2.12, 95% CI 1.10 to 4.07) and (18 deaths; SMR=2.32, 95% CI 1.46 to 3.68), respectively. Similar mortality trends for these two cancers were found in analyses by gender.
Consistencies by sex and exposure level make a strong case for a link between exposure to inorganic lead and cancers of the kidney and pancreas.
PubMed ID
22039095 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality among leather tanners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26340
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1986 Jul;43(7):494-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1986
Author
C. Edling
H. Kling
U. Flodin
O. Axelson
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1986 Jul;43(7):494-6
Date
Jul-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Pancreatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Stomach Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Sweden
Tanning
Abstract
Workers were studied at a tannery that operated from 1873 to 1960, once one of the biggest in Scandinavia. The results show a slight numerical increase of deaths from cancer of the stomach and a significant, threefold excess mortality from cancer of the pancreas. Even in view of critical questions about validity it seems likely that this excess might be related to exposure to chemicals in tannery work.
PubMed ID
3718898 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality associated with the high-temperature oxidation of nickel subsulfide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241118
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1984;(53):23-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
R S Roberts
J A Julian
D C Muir
H S Shannon
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1984;(53):23-35
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Carcinogens, Environmental
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Nickel - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Abstract
An historical prospective mortality study of INCO's Ontario work-force has been conducted. A cohort of approximately 54 000 men, employed in all aspects of the extraction and refining of copper and nickel from the Sudbury ore deposit, have been followed for mortality between 1950 and 1976. A total of 5 283 deaths were identified by computerized record-linkage to the Canadian Mortality Data Base of death certificates. The analysis focuses on mortality from cancer of the nasal sinuses, larynx, lung, and kidney. Little evidence was found for increased mortality from laryngeal or kidney cancer, but lung and nasal cancer deaths were clearly elevated in men exposed to the two Sudbury area sinter plants and at Port Colborne in the leaching, calcining, and sintering department. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lung cancer increases linearly with increasing duration of exposure and there is no evidence of a threshold. The nasal cancer mortality rate also rises linearly with duration of exposure. While lung cancer has a greater excess in the Sudbury sinter plant than at Port Colborne, the reverse is true for mortality from nasal cancer, which is ten times more frequent at Port Colborne than at Sudbury.
PubMed ID
6532983 View in PubMed
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73 records – page 1 of 8.