Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

19 records – page 1 of 2.

Accidental out-of-hospital births in Finland: incidence and geographical distribution 1963-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202145
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 May;78(5):372-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
K. Viisainen
M. Gissler
A L Hartikainen
E. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
STAKES (National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health), University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 May;78(5):372-8
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Delivery Rooms - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Hospitals - standards
Hospitals, Maternity - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Urban Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study aims to describe the incidence and geographical distribution of accidental out-of-hospital births (accidental births) in Finland in relation to the changes in the hospital network, and to compare the perinatal outcomes of accidental births and all hospital births.
Data for the incidence and distribution analyses of accidental births were obtained from the official statistics between 1962 and 1973 and from the national Medical Birth Registry (MBR) in 1992-1993. The infant outcomes were analyzed for the MBR data in 1991-1995.
Between 1963 and 1975 the central hospital network expanded and by 1975 they covered 72% of births. The number of small maternity units has decreased since 1963. The incidence of accidental births decreased between 1963 and 1973, from 1.3 to 0.4 per 1000 births, and rose by the 1990s to 1/1000. In the 1990s the parity adjusted risk of an accidental birth was higher for residents of northern than of southern Finland, OR 2.51 (CI 1.75-3.60), and for residents of rural compared to urban municipalities, OR 3.26 (CI 2.48-4.27). The birthweight adjusted risk for a perinatal death was higher in accidental births than in hospital births, OR 3.11 (CI 1.42-6.84).
A temporal correlation between closing of small hospitals and an increase in accidental birth rates was detected. Due to the poor infant outcomes of accidental births, centralization policies should include measures to their prevention.
PubMed ID
10326879 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Administration of naloxone to newborn infants at obstetric departments in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46550
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Jan 30;114(3):305-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1994
Author
I. Fagerli
T W Hansen
Author Affiliation
Neonatalseksjonen, Barneklinikken, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Jan 30;114(3):305-7
Date
Jan-30-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesia, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Meperidine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Naloxone - administration & dosage - adverse effects - contraindications
Norway
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Respiration - drug effects
Abstract
Recommendations for the dosage of naloxone to reverse opiate depression in neonates were revised by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 1989. In order to ascertain the extent to which these new recommendations have been implemented in Norway, we sent questionnaires to the maternity centres by mail. The responses from 60 different centres covered 88% of the total births in Norway in 1991. The dosages of naloxone used varied from 0.01-0.1 mg/kg, and the reported frequency of use in newborns varied between
PubMed ID
8191424 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Are better prenatal care and larger maternity wards the answer to the problem of stagnating perinatal mortality?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59615
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 May 25;154(22):1578-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-25-1992

Are physicians changing the way they practise obstetrics?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221765
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Feb 1;148(3):409-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1993
Author
J. Ruderman
J C Carroll
A J Reid
M A Murray
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Feb 1;148(3):409-15
Date
Feb-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Epidural - statistics & numerical data - trends
Delivery, Obstetric - statistics & numerical data - trends
Family Practice - methods - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Fetal Monitoring - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitals, Urban - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Obstetrics - methods - statistics & numerical data - trends
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Utilization Review
Abstract
To examine trends in obstetric interventions in women at low risk over approximately 3 years. It was postulated that there would be a general reduction in most intervention rates.
Retrospective review of hospital records.
Three downtown hospitals of the University of Toronto, in which academic and nonacademic family physicians and obstetricians practised.
A total of 2365 women in phase 1 (April 1985 to March 1986) and 1277 in phase 2 (May to September 1988) met the inclusion criteria for grade A (pregnancy at no predictable risk) of the Ontario Antenatal Record at the time of admission to hospital.
Rates of artificial rupture of the membranes, induction, augmentation, epidural anesthesia, continuous electronic fetal monitoring (EFM), instrumental delivery, episiotomy and cesarean section.
The family physicians and the obstetricians had significant decreases (p
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1979 Nov 24;2(8152):1117-991847
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1979 Oct;86(10):753-841567
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1980 May;87(5):408-127387941
Cites: Obstet Gynecol Surv. 1983 Jun;38(6):322-386346168
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1984 Apr;63(4):485-906700893
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1984 Jun 1;149(3):327-366731510
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Sep 8;289(6445):587-906432201
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Dec 21;252(23):3273-66512931
Cites: Birth. 1986 Jun;13(2):119-213521654
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1987 Feb;24(2):159-643806027
Cites: CMAJ. 1987 May 15;136(10):1041-53567763
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1987 Sep;25(3):237-423305766
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1987;66(5):421-43425243
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1988 Aug;27(2):153-633042905
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Dec 8;319(23):1511-63185675
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 Mar 15;140(6):625-332920336
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 Nov 9;321(19):1306-112677732
Cites: Fam Med. 1991 Mar-Apr;23(3):184-82016008
PubMed ID
8439912 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors predicting antenatal hospital admission in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58964
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Jun;16(2):85-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
B. Rostad
B. Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, University Medical Centre, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Jun;16(2):85-9
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Norway
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prenatal Care - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify factors predicting hospital admission in pregnancy before the delivery. DESIGN: A case-control study within a cohort study of pregnant women admitted and not admitted to hospital during pregnancy. SETTING: University obstetric departments in three Scandinavian cities. SUBJECTS: 451 parous pregnant women attending antenatal care. Eighty-eight women were admitted to hospital before delivery, and 363 women were not hospitalized. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Antepartum hospital admission in pregnancy. RESULTS: There were significant differences between the groups with respect to health-related characteristics to explain the observed difference in hospital admission. Furthermore, significantly more women hospitalized in pregnancy had experienced severe life events. CONCLUSION: Factors predictive of hospital admission were identified as pregnancy complications, adverse reproductive health history, and severe life events.
PubMed ID
9689685 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fear of birth: Prevalence, counselling and method of birth at five obstetrical units in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309690
Source
Women Birth. 2020 Feb; 33(1):97-104
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Feb-2020
Author
Lena Henriksen
Anette Borgen
Jeanette Risløkken
Mirjam Lukasse
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Oslo Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 4 St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo, Norway; Division of General Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: lena.henriksen@oslomet.no.
Source
Women Birth. 2020 Feb; 33(1):97-104
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Cesarean Section - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Counseling - methods
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Prenatal Care - methods
Prevalence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
There is increasing evidence that fear of birth can have long-term effects on the childbearing woman and the method of birth.
To examine differences between five hospitals in Norway in the occurrence of fear of birth, counselling received and method of birth.
Source data was from the Norwegian cohort of the Bidens study and retrieved through a questionnaire and electronic patient records from five different hospitals in Oslo, Drammen, Tromsø, Ålesund and Trondheim, which included 2145 women. The Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire measured fear of birth, and a cut-off of =85 was used to define fear of birth.
In total, 12% of the women reported fear of birth, with no significant differences between the different units. A total of 8.7% received counselling according to hospital obstetrical records, varying significantly from 5.7% in Drammen to 12.7% in Oslo. Only 24.9% of the women with fear of birth had counselling at their hospital. All the units provided counselling for women with fear, but the content varied. Overarching aims included helping women develop coping strategies like writing a birth plan and clearing up issues regarding prior births. A secondary objective was to prevent unnecessary caesarean section. Both primi- and multiparous women who reported fear of birth had a twofold increased risk of a planned caesarean section.
There were no differences between five Norwegian hospitals regarding the occurrence of fear of birth. Counselling methods, resources, level of commitment and the number of women who received counselling varied; thus, hospital practices differed.
PubMed ID
30522889 View in PubMed
Less detail

Freestanding midwifery units versus obstetric units: does the effect of place of birth differ with level of social disadvantage?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123169
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:478
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Charlotte Overgaard
Morten Fenger-Grøn
Jane Sandall
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, 9220Aalborg, Denmark. co@hst.aau.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:478
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birthing Centers - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Midwifery - statistics & numerical data
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Social inequity in perinatal and maternal health is a well-documented health problem even in countries with a high level of social equality. We aimed to study whether the effect of birthplace on perinatal and maternal morbidity, birth interventions and use of pain relief among low risk women intending to give birth in two freestanding midwifery units (FMU) versus two obstetric units in Denmark differed by level of social disadvantage.
The study was designed as a cohort study with a matched control group. It included 839 low-risk women intending to give birth in an FMU, who were prospectively and individually matched on nine selected obstetric/socio-economic factors to 839 low-risk women intending OU birth. Educational level was chosen as a proxy for social position. Analysis was by intention-to-treat.
Women intending to give birth in an FMU had a significantly higher likelihood of uncomplicated, spontaneous birth with good outcomes for mother and infant compared to women intending to give birth in an OU. The likelihood of intact perineum, use of upright position for birth and water birth was also higher. No difference was found in perinatal morbidity or third/fourth degree tears, while birth interventions including caesarean section and epidural analgesia were significantly less frequent among women intending to give birth in an FMU. In our sample of healthy low-risk women with spontaneous onset of labour at term after an uncomplicated pregnancy, the positive results of intending to give birth in an FMU as compared to an OU were found to hold for both women with post-secondary education and the potentially vulnerable group of FMU women without post-secondary education. In all cases, women without post-secondary education intending to give birth in an FMU had comparable and, in some respects, more favourable outcomes when compared to women with the same level of education intending to give birth in an OU. In this sample of low-risk women, we found that the effect of intended place on birth outcomes did not differ with women's level of education.
FMU care appears to offer important benefits for birthing women with no additional risk to the infant. Both for women with and without post-secondary education, intending to give birth in an FMU significantly increased the likelihood of a spontaneous, uncomplicated birth with good outcomes for mother and infant compared to women intending to give birth in an OU. All women should be provided with adequate information about different care models and supported in making an informed decision about the place of birth.
Notes
Cites: J Nurse Midwifery. 1992 Jul-Aug;37(4):222-531403170
Cites: J Nurse Midwifery. 1992 Sep-Oct;37(5):301-301403177
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1993 Jan;83(1):9-128417615
Cites: Midwifery. 2010 Dec;26(6):e37-4319327877
Cites: Birth. 2011 Jun;38(2):111-921599733
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2000 Jul;14(3):194-21010949211
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):79-8221775359
Cites: Semin Perinatol. 2011 Aug;35(4):240-421798404
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:60621801399
Cites: BMJ. 2011;343:d740022117057
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Mar;66(3):240-620924053
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Apr;74(7):973-8122326105
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1993 Apr;72(3):181-88385853
Cites: J Public Health Policy. 1993 Spring;14(1):82-908486754
Cites: J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 1995 Mar;16(1):1-97787952
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Sep;86(3):411-67651653
Cites: Midwifery. 1995 Sep;11(3):120-97565155
Cites: Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol. 1996 Jan-Feb;200(1):2-128681127
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Mar;24(1):55-618740877
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1997;18:341-789143723
Cites: J Public Health Med. 1997 Jun;19(2):156-619243430
Cites: Outcomes Manag Nurs Pract. 1998 Apr-Jun;2(2):71-59582819
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1999 May 15;149(10):908-1510342799
Cites: Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 1999 May;65(2):149-5610405059
Cites: BJOG. 2005 Jul;112(7):994-615958007
Cites: Pract Midwife. 2005 Jun;8(6):22-415977932
Cites: Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2005 Jul;90(4):F337-816036892
Cites: Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol. 2006 Oct;210(5):166-7217099838
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(7):840-817611830
Cites: BMJ. 2007 Oct 20;335(7624):806-817947786
Cites: Epidemiology. 2007 Nov;18(6):805-3518049195
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 Apr;62(4):325-3118339825
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Aug;36(6):635-4918775820
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Oct;37(5):1109-2018577529
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(4):CD00466718843666
Cites: Birth. 2008 Sep;35(3):171-818844642
Cites: Birth. 2008 Sep;35(3):241-418844650
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 Mar;63(3):259-6118579626
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2009 Jan;23(1):66-7519228316
Cites: J Midwifery Womens Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;54(2):111-819249656
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 Apr;63(4):281-519147631
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 Jun;63(6):420-519211588
Cites: Health Econ. 2009 Jul;18(7):823-4118816582
Cites: Midwifery. 2009 Aug;25(4):439-4818082298
Cites: BMJ. 2009;339:b470219952036
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010;89(2):238-4219824867
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2010 Mar;14(2):209-1419199016
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(9):CD00001220824824
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2000 Jan-Feb;91(1):I5-1110765581
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Jul 15;321(7254):137-4110894690
Cites: BJOG. 2001 Jan;108(1):48-5511213004
Cites: Midwifery. 2001 Jun;17(2):102-1411399131
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2002 Mar;37(5):485-9311843988
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2002 Aug;81(8):731-712174157
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol. 2002 Mar;22(2):143-912521694
Cites: Birth. 2003 Mar;30(1):11-2212581035
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Apr;57(4):254-812646539
Cites: Pract Midwife. 2003 Mar;6(3):26-3112677840
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Jun;93(6):999-100612773368
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2003 Sep;18(3):330-712917274
Cites: Birth. 2003 Dec;30(4):235-4714992154
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Jun;58(11):2279-8915047084
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Jun 12;328(7453):139915191977
Cites: Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol. 2004 Jun;208(3):110-715229818
Cites: Pediatrics. 2004 Sep;114(3):708-1315342843
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1984;18(8):621-316374910
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1986 Apr;67(4):598-6033960432
Cites: Birth. 1987 Mar;14(1):18-243646887
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 Dec 28;321(26):1804-112687692
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug;21(4):720-41521976
PubMed ID
22726575 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indications for cesarean section in singleton pregnancies in two Danish counties with different cesarean section rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59419
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Feb;73(2):129-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
L S Sperling
T B Henriksen
H. Ulrichsen
M. Hedegård
H. Møller
V. Hansen
B. Ovlisen
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Central Hospital of Hillerød, Denmark.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Feb;73(2):129-35
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apgar score
Birth weight
Breech Presentation
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Cesarean Section, Repeat - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Dystocia - surgery
Female
Fetal Distress - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Surgery Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. To compare the clinical indications for delivery by cesarean section (CS) in singleton pregnancies in two Danish counties with different CS rates, and to describe the relation between CS in the two counties and parity, mother's age, type of delivery department, gestational age at birth, and birthweight. DESIGN. A population-based, follow-up study based on antecedent data. SETTING. Two Danish counties, where women deliver in obstetric as well as surgical departments, with a CS rate of 8.3% and 15.2%, respectively. SUBJECTS. All pregnant women in the two counties who delivered in 1989. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Comparison of the rates of CS in the two counties carried out for five well-defined clinical indications: Previous cesarean section, breech presentation, dystocia, fetal distress, and other. SECONDARY MEASURES. Neonatal and maternal outcomes. RESULTS. In the county with the higher frequency of CS, all indications for CS were used significantly more often, except from 'fetal distress' in primiparous women. In this county 'breech presentation' was the commonest indication among primiparous women, whereas 'fetal distress' was the most common in the county with the lower CS rate. For multiparous women the highest CS rates in both counties were found among women who had had a previous CS. The major difference between the two counties was the threefold greater risk of CS indicated by 'dystocia' among multiparous women in the county with the higher CS rate. CONCLUSION. The regional differences in CS could not be explained by differences between the two populations or by an increased rate of a single indication, but could be due to differences in obstetric practice or expectations or demands from the pregnant women.
PubMed ID
8116351 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Is a cesarean section rate of less than 12% possible in a tertiary level hospital center?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224220
Source
Union Med Can. 1992 Mar-Apr;121(2):96-100
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Blouin
Author Affiliation
Département d'obstétrique-gynécologie, Faculté de médecine, Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Union Med Can. 1992 Mar-Apr;121(2):96-100
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breech Presentation
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Vaginal Birth after Cesarean - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In the last few years, the C-section rate has steadily increased to more than 20% in many medical centers. In 1985-1986, the obstetrical department of the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke, the tertiary perinatal care center for region 05, Province of Quebec, adopted a policy in favor of vaginal delivery following a previous C-section (VBAC) and vaginal delivery for breech presentation. In less than five years, this policy has brought down the C-section rate from 20 to 15% and an analysis of the data shows that this rate could even be lowered to less than 12%.
PubMed ID
1570665 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is the operative delivery rate in low-risk women dependent on the level of birth care? A randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133019
Source
BJOG. 2011 Oct;118(11):1357-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
S. Bernitz
R. Rolland
E. Blix
M. Jacobsen
K. Sjøborg
P. Øian
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Østfold Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway. stiber@so-hf.no
Source
BJOG. 2011 Oct;118(11):1357-64
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Analgesia - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Analgesia, Epidural - statistics & numerical data
Apgar score
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Midwifery - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Patient Transfer - statistics & numerical data
Postpartum Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate possible differences in operative delivery rate among low-risk women, randomised to an alongside midwifery-led unit or to standard obstetric units within the same hospital.
Randomised controlled trial.
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Østfold Hospital Trust, Tromsø, Norway.
A total of 1111 women assessed to be at low risk at onset of spontaneous labour.
Randomisation into one of three birth units: the special unit; the normal unit; or the midwife-led unit.
Total operative delivery rate, augmentation, pain relief, postpartum haemorrhage, sphincter injuries and intrapartum transfer, Apgar score
Notes
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1992 Aug;80(2):161-51635724
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Jun;89(6):813-620397761
Cites: Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2000 Aug;40(3):268-7411065032
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2001 Mar;80(3):206-1211207485
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Apr 13;324(7342):892-511950741
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2002 Aug;81(8):731-712174157
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Jun;93(6):999-100612773368
Cites: BJOG. 2004 Jan;111(1):71-814687055
Cites: Midwifery. 2004 Mar;20(1):61-7115020028
Cites: Birth. 2004 Sep;31(3):222-915330886
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1971 May;27(3):239-455581186
Cites: Birth. 1990 Dec;17(4):2342285446
Cites: J Nurse Midwifery. 1991 Jul-Aug;36(4):215-201895169
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(9):CD00001220824824
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1993 Apr;100(4):316-238494832
Cites: BMJ. 1994 Nov 26;309(6966):1400-47819846
Cites: Birth. 1996 Sep;23(3):128-358924098
Cites: Birth. 1997 Mar;24(1):17-269271963
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 1999 Apr;25(2):107-1210379125
Cites: Birth. 2005 Mar;32(1):67-815725207
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Oct 6;125(19):2635-716215608
Cites: BMJ. 2007 Sep 29;335(7621):667-817901518
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(4):CD00466718843666
Cites: BJOG. 2009 Mar;116(4):537-42; discussion 542-419250365
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2009;9:2519545412
Comment In: BJOG. 2012 Feb;119(3):377; author reply 377-822239420
Erratum In: BJOG. 2011 Dec;118(13):1688
PubMed ID
21749629 View in PubMed
Less detail

19 records – page 1 of 2.