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Factors associated with high-risk pregnancies in Canadian Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1789
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 120:291-294.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
Murdock, A.I.
Author Affiliation
Health and Welfare Canada
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 120:291-294.
Date
1979
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Obstetrical risk factors
Reproductive history
Obstetrical care
Adolescent
Adult
Asphyxia Neonatorum - epidemiology
Canada
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Fetal Death
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Labor, Induced
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Risk
Abstract
Antenatal risk factors and management problems during labour and delivery were examined for 141 consecutive deliveries in Canadian Inuit of the eastern Arctic. The applicability of three risk scoring systems for antenatal use was evaluated. Pregnancies were categorized as being at high, moderate or low risk according to the authors' published criteria. Only two of the systems gave statistically valid predictions of the outcome of pregnancy in terms of risk categorization. Sensitivity and uniformity of the systems were lacking: the risk scores were low in 32% to 58% of the pregnancies in which the mother or the infant or both had problems during labour or delivery or both, and in 27% to 36% of the pregnancies in which the infant alone had problems. Antepartum factors that indicated a significantly increased risk of problems during labour or delivery or both were maternal age less than 16 or more than 35 years, prevous stillbirth or neonatal death, previous birth weight of less than 2501 g, previous pastpartum hemorrhage or other problem in the third stage of labour, antituberculosis therapy in the mother, and any of antepartum hemorrhage, multiple pregnancy, breech delivery, malpresentation or long period between rupture of the membranes and delivery in the current pregnancy. The data indicate that scoring systems should take into account regional or population variations if they are to have reasonable sensitivity.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2636.
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Joint Working Group of the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada, the College of Family Physicians of Canada Committee on Maternity Care, and the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101151
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 1998 Spring;3(2):75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spring-1998
  1 website  
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 1998 Spring;3(2):75
Date
Spring-1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Audit and peer review
Canada
Evidence-based practice standards
Guidelines
Informed choice
Maternity programs
Obstetrical risk
Regionalized care
Rural maternity care
Safety
Transfer options
Women
Abstract
The Society of Rural Physicians of Canada (SRPC), the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) Committee on Maternity Care and the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) share a commitment to provide the best maternity care possible for Canadian women. Representatives of these 3 organizations have formed a joint working group to develop policies and guidelines to support rural maternity care. The working group recognizes that input from rural women, nurses, midwives and physicians will be essential to the ultimate success of the implementation of these guidelines.
Online Resources
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