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318 records – page 1 of 32.

[A 4-year retrospective study of neonatal outcome on preterm premature rupture of the membranes]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59367
Source
Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi. 1994 Oct;29(10):578-81, 635
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
L F Wu
P. Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Beijing Obstetries and Gynecology Hospital.
Source
Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi. 1994 Oct;29(10):578-81, 635
Date
Oct-1994
Language
Chinese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Female
Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture - therapy
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Obstetric labor, premature
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
During a four year period, 60 patients with premature rupture of membranes (PROM) met the inclusion criteria of having a single living fetus with gestational age between 25 to 36 weeks and more than 24 hours between PROM and delivery were admitted in Karolinska Hospital, Sweden. These cases were reviewed retrospectively. Five neonates died postnatally and the total survival rate was 91.7%. Three of them had major malformations and one died of hyaline membrane disease with 29 weeks of gestational age. In only one case the immediate cause of death was due to infection. The present protocol of expectant treatment for PROM in this hospital tends to be a minimum of unnecessary intervention for obtaining a high survival rate.
PubMed ID
7712867 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of antidepressant use in pregnancy: an evaluation of fetal growth and preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149046
Source
Depress Anxiety. 2010;27(1):35-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
A. Einarson
J. Choi
T R Einarson
G. Koren
Author Affiliation
The Motherisk Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. einarson@sickkids.ca
Source
Depress Anxiety. 2010;27(1):35-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - chemically induced
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Obstetric Labor, Premature - chemically induced - epidemiology
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnancy outcome
Risk
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
To compare the rates of low birth weight, preterm delivery and small for gestational age (SGA), in pregnancy outcomes among women who were exposed and nonexposed to antidepressants during pregnancy.
At The Motherisk Program, we analyzed pregnancy outcomes of 1,243 women in our database who took various antidepressants during their pregnancy. Nine hundred and twenty-eight of these women and 928 nonexposed women who delivered a live born infant were matched for age, (+/-2 years), smoking and alcohol use and specific pregnancy outcomes were compared between the two groups.
There were 82 (8.8%) preterm deliveries in the antidepressant group and 50 (5.4%) in the comparison group. OR: 1.7 (95% CI: 1.18-2.45). There were 89 (9.6%) in the antidepressant group and 76 (8.2%) in the comparison group who delivered babies evaluated as SGA; OR: 1.19 (95% CI: 0.86-1.64). The mean birth weight in the antidepressant group was 3,449+/-591 g and 3,455+/-515 g in the comparison group (P=.8).
The use of antidepressants in pregnancy appears to be associated with a small, but statistically significant increased rate in the incidence of preterm births, confirming results from several other studies. It is difficult to ascertain whether this small increased rate of preterm births is confounded by depression, antidepressants, or both. However, we did not find a statistically significant difference in the incidence of SGA or lower birth weight. This information adds to limited data available in the literature regarding these outcomes following the use of antidepressants in pregnancy.
PubMed ID
19691030 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes in snuff users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58354
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Oct;189(4):939-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Lucinda J England
Richard J Levine
James L Mills
Mark A Klebanoff
Kai F Yu
Sven Cnattingius
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research, Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. englandl@mail.nih.gov
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Oct;189(4):939-43
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of smokeless tobacco use during pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: We examined birth weight, preterm delivery, and preeclampsia in women who were delivered of singleton, live-born infants in Sweden from 1999 through 2000. For each snuff user, 10 cigarette smokers and 10 tobacco nonusers were selected randomly. RESULTS: After exclusions, 789 snuff users, 11,240 smokers, and 11,495 nonusers remained. Compared with nonusers, adjusted mean birth weight was reduced in snuff users by 39 g (95% CI, 6-72 g) and in smokers by 190 g (95% CI, 178-202 g). Preterm delivery was increased in snuff users and smokers (adjusted odds ratios, 1.98 [95% CI, 1.46-2.68] and 1.57 [95% CI, 1.38-1.80], respectively). Preeclampsia was reduced in smokers (adjusted odds ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.53-0.75) but increased in snuff users (adjusted odds ratio, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.09-2.27). CONCLUSION: Snuff use was associated with increased risk of preterm delivery and preeclampsia. Snuff does not appear to be a safe alternative to cigarettes during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
14586330 View in PubMed
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Adverse reproduction outcomes among employees working in biomedical research laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58543
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Helena Wennborg
Jens Peter Bonde
Magnus Stenbeck
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences, Novum Research Park, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. helena.wennborg@biosci.ki.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):5-11
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology - etiology
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Laboratory Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Pregnancy
Reference Values
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate reproductive outcomes such as birthweight, preterm births, and postterrm births among women working in research laboratories while pregnant. METHODS: Female university personnel were identified from a source cohort of Swedish laboratory employees, and the database was linked to the medical birth register. The first births of the women were included in the analysis, 249 pregnancies among the women with laboratory work and 613 pregnancies among the women without laboratory tasks. Information about exposure to various laboratory agents was obtained from a previous questionnaire investigation at the research group level according to a specific definition. The ponderal index and ratio between observed and expected birthweights were calculated. Logistic regression models were used for analyses of dichotomous outcomes (preterm, postterrm and birthweight). RESULTS: Exposure to laboratory work with solvents was associated with an increased risk of preterm births, the estimated odds ratio (OR) being 3.4 (1.0
PubMed ID
11871853 View in PubMed
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Agricultural contamination of groundwater as a possible risk factor for growth restriction or prematurity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194907
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2001 Apr;43(4):377-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
J. Bukowski
G. Somers
J. Bryanton
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre, University of Prince Edward Island.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2001 Apr;43(4):377-83
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Case-Control Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nitrates - adverse effects - analysis
Obstetric Labor, Premature - chemically induced - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prince Edward Island - epidemiology
Risk factors
Topography, Medical
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - analysis
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Agricultural activity on Prince Edward Island poses a potential hazard to groundwater, which is the sole source of drinking water on the island. This study investigates the potential impact of groundwater nitrate exposure on prematurity and intrauterine growth restriction on Prince Edward Island. A total of 210 intrauterine growth restriction cases, 336 premature births, and 4098 controls were abstracted from a database of all Island births. An ecological measure of groundwater nitrate level was used to gauge potential exposure to agriculturally contaminated drinking water. The higher nitrate exposure categories were positively associated with intrauterine growth restriction and prematurity, and significant dose-response trends were seen, even after adjustment for several important covariates. Nevertheless, these risks must be interpreted cautiously because of the ecological nature of this exposure metric. An investigation using nitrate levels for individual study subjects is needed to confirm this association.
PubMed ID
11322099 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption among first-time mothers and the risk of preterm birth: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286219
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2016 Apr;26(4):275-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Maria T G Dale
Leiv S Bakketeig
Per Magnus
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2016 Apr;26(4):275-82
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology - etiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Norway
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Premature Birth
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Our aim was to explore the association between alcohol consumption, before and during pregnancy, and the risk of preterm birth among 46,252 primiparous mothers.
We obtained information on alcohol consumption from questionnaire responses at pregnancy week 15 from the prospective, observational Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Data on preterm birth, categorized as delivery before gestation week 37, were retrieved from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway.
Among the participants, 91% consumed alcohol before pregnancy and fewer than 20% reported consuming alcohol during pregnancy. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for preterm birth associated with prepregnancy alcohol consumption was 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70-0.95). We did not find a risk reduction for overall drinking during pregnancy, aOR = 1.03 (95% CI, 0.90-1.19). However, dose-response analyses showed tendencies toward adverse effects when drinking 1-3 times per month during the first 15 weeks of pregnancy, aOR = 1.51 (95% CI, 1.14-2.00).
We did not find any effects of alcohol consumption during pregnancy, whereas pre-pregnancy drinking was associated with reduced risk of preterm birth. Residual confounding may have influenced the risk estimates, especially before pregnancy, as nondrinkers have lower socioeconomic status and well-being than drinkers.
PubMed ID
26520847 View in PubMed
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Amphetamine addiction and pregnancy. II. Pregnancy, delivery and the neonatal period. Socio-medical aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60548
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1981;60(3):253-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
M. Eriksson
G. Larsson
R. Zetterström
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1981;60(3):253-9
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced
Amphetamine - adverse effects
Female
Fetal Death - chemically induced
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric - drug effects
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Obstetric Labor, Premature - chemically induced
Pregnancy - drug effects
Pregnancy Complications - chemically induced
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - complications
Sweden
Abstract
The adverse effects of amphetamine addiction during pregnancy and the neonatal period were studied in 69 Swedish women. Almost one-third of the women (Group I) succeeded in overcoming their addiction in early pregnancy. The women in Group I (n = 17), unlike those in Group II (n = 53), received the same amount of prenatal care as the average Swedish woman. An increased rate of preterm deliveries (25%) as well as a higher perinatal mortality (7.5%) was found in Group II. During the neonatal period an increased incidence of mother-infant separation was found since many of the infants (46%) were transferred to pediatric wards for medical and social reasons. All newborns in Group I and 74% of infants born to mothers with continuous amphetamine addiction throughout pregnancy remained in their mother's custody following discharge from the maternity clinic.
PubMed ID
7270093 View in PubMed
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An analysis of antenatal hospitalization in Canada, 1991-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79932
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2007 Mar;11(2):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Liu Shiliang
Heaman Maureen
Sauve Reg
Liston Robert
Reyes Francesca
Bartholomew Sharon
Young David
Kramer Michael S
Author Affiliation
Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Centre for Health Promotion, Public Health Agency of Canada, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Shiliang_Liu@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2007 Mar;11(2):181-7
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Incidence
Morbidity
Obstetric labor, premature
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - therapy
Uterine Hemorrhage
Vomiting
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the incidence and temporal trends of hospitalization during pregnancy, and provide additional information on maternal morbidity among Canadian women. METHODS: A population-based cohort study was conducted using the Canadian Institute for Health Information's Discharge Abstract Database between fiscal year 1991/92 and 2002/03. This database included antenatal hospitalizations for all hospital deliveries (N=3,103,365) in Canada except for those occurring in Manitoba and Quebec. Temporal trends, and variations in the non-delivery antenatal hospitalization ratio (per 100 deliveries) by maternal age and province or territory were quantified. Primary causes for antenatal hospitalization, the lengths of in-hospital stay, and changing pattern by maternal age and time period were compared. RESULTS: The overall antenatal hospitalization ratio declined by 43%, from 24.0 per 100 deliveries in 1991/92 to 13.6 in 2002/03. Younger women tended to be hospitalized more frequently than older women: 27.1 per 100 deliveries for women aged less than 20 years and 21.5 per 100 deliveries for 20-24 years, respectively, compared to 11.5 per 100 for women aged 35-39 years. The antenatal hospitalization ratio varied greatly by province/territory--from 12.2 per 100 deliveries in Ontario to 30.7 in the Yukon. Threatened preterm labour, antenatal hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, severe vomiting and diabetes remained the five most common causes for antenatal hospitalization, although the trends for the first four declined dramatically from 1991/92 to 2002/03. Younger women were more likely to be admitted for threatened preterm labour and severe vomiting, while older women were more likely to be admitted for antenatal hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The decline in antenatal hospitalization may reflect changes in management of pregnancy complications, e.g., transition from in-hospital care to out-of-hospital care, and introduction of antepartum home care programs. Information on interprovincial/territorial variations in antenatal hospitalization may be helpful in directing future maternal health care.
PubMed ID
17089198 View in PubMed
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An association of chorionicity with preterm twin birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179694
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Jun;26(6):571-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Debora Penava
Renato Natale
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Western Ontario, London ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Jun;26(6):571-4
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Chorion - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
To assess the risk factors for preterm birth in twin pregnancies, particularly monochorionicity.
A cohort study of 767 sets of twins, each twin weighing more than 500 g, born between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 2001, at St. Joseph's Health Care in London, Ontario. Statistical analysis was performed using forward stepwise logistic regression models, with gestational age at birth less than 28 or 32 weeks as the outcome.
Polyhydramnios and chorioamnionitis were significant risk factors for preterm birth prior to 28 or 32 weeks' gestation. Monochorionicity was a risk factor for preterm birth prior to 32 weeks' gestation. Past term birth and maternal age over 30 years were associated with reduced risk for preterm birth.
Monochorionic placentation is a significant risk factor for preterm twin birth.
PubMed ID
15193202 View in PubMed
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An increasing proportion of infants weigh more than 4000 grams at birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47667
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2001 Oct;80(10):931-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
J. Ørskou
U. Kesmodel
T B Henriksen
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. joerskou@hotmail.com
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2001 Oct;80(10):931-6
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Birth weight
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To investigate how mean birthweight has changed in the past decade, and to describe changes in the proportion of infants with a birthweight above 4000 grams (g). METHODS: We analyzed data on 43,561 singleton infants born between 1990 and 1999 at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Information on birthweight, gestational age, stillbirths, malformations, mode of delivery, prelabor intervention, and maternal diabetes was obtained from birth registration forms. RESULTS: For all infants mean birthweight increased by 45 g (95% CI: 20-70 g) from 3474 g in 1990 to 3519 g in 1999. For infants born at term the mean increase was 62 g (95% CI: 41-83 g). During the same period the percentage of infants born with a birthweight above 4000 g increased from 16.7% in 1990 to 20.0% in 1999 (p
PubMed ID
11580738 View in PubMed
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318 records – page 1 of 32.