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16 records – page 1 of 2.

Application of the Winnipeg model to obstetric and neonatal audit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197323
Source
Top Health Inf Manage. 2000 May;20(4):12-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
J M Davies
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Top Health Inf Manage. 2000 May;20(4):12-22
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Database Management Systems
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Medical Audit
Models, organizational
Neonatal Nursing - standards
Obstetric Nursing - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Abstract
This article describes the development of a database to facilitate quality assurance review of obstetric and neonatal care. The neonatal component of the database was developed as an alternative classification system to that of Wigglesworth's. The architecture of the new database follows that of the Winnipeg model, developed in part for the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Inquest in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Use of the Winnipeg model allows reviewers to determine not only what happened and how, but more importantly, why. The new database provides a starting point for educational endeavors for all those involved in the care of patients, with the aim of preventing future deaths and other adverse outcomes.
PubMed ID
10977139 View in PubMed
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The components of women's satisfaction with maternity care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230223
Source
Birth. 1989 Sep;16(3):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
L. Séguin
R. Therrien
F. Champagne
D. Larouche
Source
Birth. 1989 Sep;16(3):109-13
Date
Sep-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric
Maternal Health Services - standards
Obstetric Nursing - standards
Patient Education as Topic - standards
Patient Participation
Pregnancy
Quebec
Random Allocation
Abstract
For a better understanding of how women's satisfaction with maternity care is affected, a representative sample of 1790 women from the Montreal area who had delivered four to seven months earlier were mailed a postal questionnaire; 938 (52.4%) completed and returned it. With factor analysis, we determined five dimensions to women's satisfaction: (a) the delivery itself, (b) medical care, (c) nursing care, (d) information received and participation in the decision-making process, and (e) physical aspects of the labor and delivery rooms. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine explicative factors for each of these dimensions of satisfaction. Items relative to the delivery process such as pain intensity, complications, and length of labor were the most important for the delivery experience itself. Participation in the decision-making process was the first component of satisfaction with medical care. Information received appeared to be the major component of their satisfaction with nursing care. The physical environment did not affect women's satisfaction with obstetric care.
PubMed ID
2789558 View in PubMed
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Development and psychometric testing of The Care in Obstetrics: Measure for Testing Satisfaction (COMFORTS) scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171250
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2006 Feb;29(1):51-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Patricia A Janssen
Cindy-Lee Dennis
Birgit Reime
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2006 Feb;29(1):51-60
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
Delivery, Obstetric - nursing - psychology - standards
Discriminant Analysis
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Facility Environment - standards
Hospitals, Maternity
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Maternal-Child Nursing - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Obstetric Nursing - standards
Obstetrics - standards
Parity
Patient Participation - psychology
Patient satisfaction
Postnatal Care - psychology - standards
Pregnancy
Privacy
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
This paper describes the development and psychometric assessment of a scale to measure satisfaction with intrapartum and postpartum care in hospital: The Care in Obstetrics: A Measure For Testing Satisfaction (COMFORTS) scale. A sample of 415 participants completed the 40-item scale. Cronbach's alpha for the scale was .95. Evaluation of construct validity through principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation yielded six subscales: confidence in newborn care, postpartum nursing care, provision of choice, the physical environment, respect for privacy, and labor/delivery nursing care. The COMFORTS scale was able to discriminate between multiparous versus primiparous women, and between women cared for in single room maternity care versus in separate labor/delivery and postpartum rooms. Pending further validation, the COMFORTS scale has potential to measure women's satisfaction with childbirth care and contribute to an assessment of the quality of care provided.
PubMed ID
16404734 View in PubMed
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The effect of unrestricted oral carbohydrate intake on labor progress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174811
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2005 May-Jun;34(3):319-28
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joan E Tranmer
Ellen D Hodnett
Mary E Hannah
Bonnie J Stevens
Author Affiliation
Nursing Research Unit, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 2V7. tranmerj@KGH.KARI.NET
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2005 May-Jun;34(3):319-28
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - metabolism
Dystocia - epidemiology - nursing - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric - metabolism
Obstetric Nursing - standards
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Time Factors
Abstract
To determine if unrestricted oral carbohydrate intake during labor reduced the incidence of dystocia in low-risk nulliparous women.
A randomized clinical trial at a university-affiliated hospital in southeastern Ontario. Low-risk nulliparous women were randomized between 30 and 40 weeks gestation to either an intervention or usual care group.
Women in the intervention group received, prenatally, guidelines about food and fluid intake during labor and were encouraged to eat and drink as they pleased during labor. Women in the usual care group received no prelabor information and were restricted to ice chips and water during labor in the hospital.
The incidence of dystocia, defined as a cervical dilatation rate of less than 0.5 cm/hr for a period of 4 hrs after a cervical dilatation of 3 cm.
Three hundred twenty-eight women were randomized to the intervention (n = 163) or usual care (n = 165) groups. Women in the intervention group reported a significantly different pattern of oral intake during early labor in the hospital (chi(2) = 40.7, p
PubMed ID
15890830 View in PubMed
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[Ensuring professional competence in maternity care centers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244629
Source
Katilolehti. 1981 Apr;86(4):121
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981

Measuring the quality of documented care given by Swedish midwives during birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140882
Source
Midwifery. 2011 Dec;27(6):e188-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Linda J Kvist
Nada Damiati
Johanna Rosenqvist
Ann-Kristin Sandin-Bojö
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Gyn. Mott, Plan 2, Helsingborgs Hospital, 25187 Helsingborg, Sweden. Linda.kvist@med.lu.se
Source
Midwifery. 2011 Dec;27(6):e188-94
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birthing Centers - organization & administration
Delivery, Obstetric - nursing - standards
Female
Fetal Monitoring - methods
Humans
Middle Aged
Midwifery - methods - standards
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment - methods - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Evaluation Research
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Perinatal Care - methods - standards
Pregnancy
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
World Health Organization
Young Adult
Abstract
To measure the extent to which documented Swedish midwifery care for low-risk labour and birth followed the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendations for care in normal birth, and to compare midwifery care given to women who's labours were classified as low and high risk.
A retrospective examination of midwifery and medical records, 144 from women with low-risk births and 54 from women with high-risk births, for aspects of pregnancy, labour and birth using a validated instrument based on WHO's recommendations.
Southern Sweden.
Care given in accordance with WHO's four categories of practice and changes in risk group during the birth process.
Care interventions not recommended by WHO, such as routine establishment of an intravenous route, routine amniotomy during the first stage, continuous electronic fetal monitoring and pharmacological methods of pain relief, were widespread in the records. Documented care differed little between the labours of women at low risk and high risk. The midwives at the unit under study did not routinely carry out risk assessment.
The mode of care was one of readiness for medical intervention. The act of carrying out risk assessments at the time of the woman's admission may affect awareness of the level of care offered to birthing women, and thus help to reduce the number and variety of practices not recommended by WHO.
PubMed ID
20833458 View in PubMed
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Midwifery care: development of an instrument to measure quality based on the World Health Organization's classification of care in normal birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182297
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Jan;13(1):75-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Ann-Kristin 'Fia' Sandin Bojö
Marie-Louise Hall-Lord
Ove Axelsson
Giggi Udén
Bodil Wilde Larsson
Author Affiliation
Division for Health and Caring Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. fia.bojo@kau.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Jan;13(1):75-83
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Delivery, Obstetric - nursing - standards
Delphi Technique
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Maternal-Child Nursing - standards
Midwifery - standards
Needs Assessment
Nurse Midwives - psychology - standards
Nurse's Role
Nursing Audit - methods - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research - methods - standards
Nursing Process - standards
Observer Variation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Quality of Health Care
Sweden
World Health Organization
Abstract
The aim of the study was to develop an instrument to measure midwifery care in relation to World Health Organization's classification of care in normal birth and to test the instrument for content validity and inter-rater reliability.
The Delphi method was used for development of the instrument and to elicit evidence of content validity. Six experts from three different geographical regions in Sweden, representing clinically working midwives, lecturers in midwifery and obstetricians, participated in the first part of the study. The instrument was tested for inter-rater reliability in an exploratory study by two midwives and one of the authors. Data were analysed using percentage of agreement level and the Kappa coefficient.
Five expert rounds were needed to reach consensus for content validity. The inter-rater reliability test showed high agreement levels (95.9, 94.2 and 95.7%) and good to very good Kappa coefficients (0.74-1.0). The final instrument consisted of 78 items divided into five sections: background (five items); practices which are demonstrably useful and should be encouraged (55 items); practices which are clearly harmful or ineffective and should be eliminated (five items); practices for which insufficient evidence exists to support a clear recommendation and which should be used with caution while further research clarifies the issue (four items); and finally practices which are frequently used inappropriately (nine items).
The instrument can be used at a labour ward to measure documented care and quality of midwifery care. The results can be used to identify areas for improvements, to develop guidelines towards evidence-based care and to improve documentation. However, the present study should be regarded as an exploratory study and the feasibility of the instrument remains to be tested in empirical studies.
PubMed ID
14687296 View in PubMed
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Nursing care in labour and patient satisfaction: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248144
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1978 Nov;3(6):535-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1978
Author
D. Shields
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1978 Nov;3(6):535-50
Date
Nov-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Canada
Clinical Competence
Consumer Satisfaction
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric
Nurse-Patient Relations
Obstetric Nursing - standards
Parity
Patient Participation
Pregnancy
Abstract
This study examined the subjective needs of labouring patients. A convenience sample of 80 postpartum patients was interviewed. They described the nursing care they had received, indicated the most helpful nursing measure received, and rated their satisfaction with their nursing care. These answers were categorized into types of nursing care. These were supportive care nursing, physical care nursing, medications and combinations of these three. X2 calculations done between these categories and satisfaction scores indicated a significant relationship between the type of care a patient received and her satisfaction scores. Patients found combined care very satisfying, but supportive care was the decisive factor in the way patients viewed their nursing care. The most frequently mentioned element in supportive care was the ability of the nurse to be a sustaining presence. The nurse's ability to assess and to meet the patient's need or non-need for her presence was major factor in patient satisfaction with nursing care in this sample. The relationship between congruency (agreement between time wanted and time spent by the nurse at the bedside) and satisfaction scores was highly significant. Thus the ability to recognize and respond to the patient's need or non-need for her presence was a crucial factor in patient satisfaction and in the way in which a nurse allocated her time. The relationships between numbers of nurses caring for a patient, parity, length of labour, presence of visitors, worries about the baby and patient satisfaction scores were examined. All were non-significant. However numbers of nurses caring for a patient was defined as a contributing factor to the delivery of supportive care nursing. More nurses contributed to more supportive care nursing being given, but was not the major factor in the delivery of supportive care nursing. Finally it was shown that the administration of syntocinon to patients in this sample decreased patient satisfaction with nursing care. Implications and possible reasons for these results are discussed.
PubMed ID
252533 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.