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16 records – page 1 of 2.

The ALARM course: 10 years of continuing professional development in intrapartum care and risk management in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167875
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2006 Jul;28(7):600-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006

Do nurses help or hinder mothers who breastfeed?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241773
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1983 Jul;8(4):281-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
D J Ellis
R J Hewat
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1983 Jul;8(4):281-8
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Breast Diseases - prevention & control
Breast Feeding
British Columbia
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Inservice training
Nurse Clinicians
Obstetric Nursing - education
Abstract
A 5-week programme of breastfeeding inservice education, included classes on a repeated series of three topics, a film, provision of reading material, tests and the availability of a nurse-clinician for consultation and assistance. The study was carried out in a 50-bed maternity unit. Participation was voluntary. Of the 112 registered nurses and 42 practical nurses, between one-third and one-half participated in one or more of the various aspects. Follow-up tests revealed considerable disagreement among the staff on knowledge and nursing interventions related to breastfeeding.
PubMed ID
6555204 View in PubMed
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Educational intervention for obstetrical nurses: introducing intravenous fentanyl to the labour floor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149371
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2009 Jun;31(6):504-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Erin Pepper
Author Affiliation
Northumberland Hills Hospital, Cobourg ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2009 Jun;31(6):504-13
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Canada
Clinical Competence
Drug Utilization - trends
Female
Fentanyl - therapeutic use
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous
Labor Pain - drug therapy
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education
Obstetric Nursing - education
Pregnancy
Abstract
To determine the efficacy of an educational intervention in changing nurses' satisfaction and comfort with and their knowledge and use of a newly introduced analgesic agent, fentanyl, to manage pain during labour.
A written survey was completed by 19 labour and delivery nurses before and after the educational intervention in a small Northern Canadian city.
Prior to the educational intervention, respondents rated their knowledge of and comfort with use of morphine and meperidine as significantly greater than their knowledge of and comfort with use of fentanyl (P
PubMed ID
19646315 View in PubMed
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Identification of the need for nursing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228094
Source
AARN News Lett. 1990 Nov;46(10):29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990

Knowledge to action: implementing a guideline for second stage labor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157415
Source
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2008 May-Jun;33(3):179-86; quiz 187-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ann E Sprague
Lawrence Oppenheimer
Linda McCabe
Ian D Graham
Barbara L Davies
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Partnership Program of Eastern and Southeastern Ontario, Canada. asprague@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2008 May-Jun;33(3):179-86; quiz 187-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Epidural - nursing
Anesthesia, Obstetrical - nursing
Chi-Square Distribution
Delivery, Obstetric - education - methods - nursing
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Feasibility Studies
Female
Guideline Adherence
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Labor Stage, Second
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Audit
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Records
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Obstetric Nursing - education - methods
Ontario
Parity
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Time Factors
Abstract
To quantify practice changes associated with implementing a clinical practice guideline for the second stage of labor in term nulliparous women with epidural anesthesia and to describe the lessons learned about knowledge translation. The main clinical practice guideline recommendation was waiting up to 2 hours before pushing after full dilatation.
Pre- and post-evaluation of clinical outcomes and knowledge translation strategies associated with implementing the second stage of labor clinical practice guideline at two birthing units within a large teaching hospital.
The implementation of the clinical practice guideline resulted in a significant increase in median waiting time before pushing of 33 minutes at Site 1. This change was also reflected in the twofold increase in the proportion of women waiting longer than 120 minutes before pushing at this site. There was no change in waiting time at Site 2. The duration of the second stage did not change significantly at either site. The median pushing time decreased at both sites but was only statistically significant at Site 1.
Bringing about practice change in obstetrics is complex. The measured change in this study was less than we expected. Greater success might have been achieved by enhancing feedback to care providers and more frequent audits of practice. We need to better understand the subtle influences in attitude and culture that prevented successful implementation in one site. For units considering a similar process, we recommend a commensurately greater level of presence in the units to encourage compliance with the clinical practice guideline in order to achieve the desired level of practice change.
PubMed ID
18453908 View in PubMed
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[Memorandum submitted by the Working Group on Maternity Care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247153
Source
Katilolehti. 1979 Jun;84(6):268-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1979

Nurses' intentions to provide continuous labor support to women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155454
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2008 Jul-Aug;37(4):405-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
Laura Payant
Barbara Davies
Ian D Graham
Wendy E Peterson
Jennifer Clinch
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Partnership Program of Eastern and Southeastern Ontario (PPPESO), Ottawa, ON Canada. lpayant@pppeso.on.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2008 Jul-Aug;37(4):405-14
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesia, Epidural - nursing - psychology
Analgesia, Obstetrical - nursing - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Intention
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Obstetric Nursing - education - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Pregnancy
Psychological Theory
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Social Support
Statistics, nonparametric
Workload
Abstract
To examine the determinants of nurses' intentions to practice continuous labor support.
A descriptive survey based on the Theory of Planned Behavior.
A large, urban Canadian hospital with 2 sites and 7,000 births per year.
Ninety-seven registered nurses from 2 birthing units.
Scores measuring nurses' attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions regarding continuous labor support for women with epidural analgesia were significantly lower than those for women without epidural analgesia (p
Notes
Comment In: MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2009 Jan-Feb;34(1):6919104327
PubMed ID
18754978 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.