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Advanced maternal age and adverse perinatal outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47166
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Oct;104(4):727-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Bo Jacobsson
Lars Ladfors
Ian Milsom
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, S-416 85 Göteborg, Sweden. bo.jacobsson@obgyn.gu.se
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Oct;104(4):727-33
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - mortality
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of maternal age on perinatal and obstetric outcome in women aged 40-44 years and those 45 years or older and to estimate whether adverse outcome was related to intercurrent illness and pregnancy complications. METHODS: National prospective, population-based, cohort study in women aged 40-44 years and those 45 years or older and in a control group of women aged 20-29 years who delivered during the period 1987-2001. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were calculated after adjustments for significant malformations, maternal pre-existing diseases, and smoking. Main outcome measures were perinatal mortality, intrauterine fetal death, neonatal death, preterm birth, and preeclampsia. RESULTS: During the 15-year period, there were 1,566,313 deliveries (876,361 women were 20-29 years of age, 31,662 were 40-44 years, and 1,205 were > or = 45 years). Perinatal mortality was 1.4%, 1.0%, and 0.5% in women 45 years or older, 40-44, and 20-29 years, respectively. Adjusted OR for perinatal mortality was 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-4.0) in women aged 45 years or older, compared with 1.7 (95% CI 1.5-1.9) in women 40-44 years. Adjusted OR for intrauterine fetal death was 3.8 (95% CI 2.2-6.4) in women aged 45 years or older, compared with 2.1 (95% CI 1.8-2.4) in women 40-44 years. Preterm birth, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia were more common among women 40-44 years of age and those 45 years or older. Perinatal mortality was increased in women with intercurrent illness or pregnancy complications compared with women without these conditions, but there was no evidence that these factors became more important with increasing age. CONCLUSION: Perinatal mortality, intrauterine fetal death, and neonatal death increased with age. There was also an increase in intercurrent illnesses and pregnancy complications with increasing age, but this did not entirely explain the observed increase in perinatal mortality with age. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II-3
PubMed ID
15458893 View in PubMed
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Age at menarche and the risk of operative delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299215
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2019 Feb; 32(3):411-418
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Hsu Phern Chong
J Frederik Frøen
Sylvia Richardson
Benoit Liquet
D Stephen Charnock-Jones
Gordon C S Smith
Author Affiliation
a Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , University of Cambridge, NIHR Cambridge Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre , Cambridge , UK.
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2019 Feb; 32(3):411-418
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, Obstetric - methods - statistics & numerical data
Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Menarche - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - surgery
Obstetrical Forceps
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Term Birth
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We sought to evaluate the impact of later menarche on the risk of operative delivery.
We studied 38,069 eligible women (first labors at term with a singleton infant in a cephalic presentation) from the Norwegian Mothers and Child Cohort Study. The main exposures were the age at menarche and the duration of the interval between menarche and the first birth.
Poisson's regression with a robust variance estimator.
Operative delivery, defined as emergency cesarean or assisted vaginal delivery (ventouse extraction or forceps).
A 5 year increase in age at menarche was associated with a reduced risk of operative delivery (risk ratio [RR] 0.84, 95%CI 0.78, 0.89; p?
PubMed ID
28958167 View in PubMed
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Anal incontinence after obstetric sphincter tears: incidence in a Norwegian county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63320
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Oct;83(10):989-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Stig Norderval
Deirdre Nsubuga
Christian Bjelke
Josef Frasunek
Idunn Myklebust
Barthold Vonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Digestive Surgery, University Hospital of Tromsö, Norway. stig.norderval@unn.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Oct;83(10):989-94
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries - surgery
Fecal Incontinence - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - surgery
Female
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - surgery
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Anal sphincter tears during vaginal delivery are a major cause of anal incontinence. We wanted to assess the incidence in a Norwegian county where primary repairs are performed in four hospitals using similar per- and postoperative protocol for the treatment of such injuries. METHODS: A postal questionnaire was distributed to all women who underwent primary repair of obstetric sphincter tears in the years 1999 and 2000 in the county of Möre and Romsdal. Symptoms of incontinence and fecal urgency were recorded. Incontinence was assessed using the Pescatori score system. RESULTS: Clinically detected sphincter tears occurred in 180 of 5123 vaginal deliveries (3.5%). The questionnaire was returned by 156 women (87%). Six women were excluded. Median follow-up was 25 months (range 4-39). Incontinence was reported by 88 women (59%), restricted to flatus incontinence in 53 cases (35%). Fecal urgency without incontinence was reported by 14 women (9%). Sixty-three women (42%) reported de novo moderate to severe symptoms. There was no difference in outcome whether the sphincter injury was partial or complete. Mean Pescatori score was 3.7 in women who felt disabled compared with 2.9 in women who did not feel disabled by their incontinence (P
PubMed ID
15453900 View in PubMed
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Anal incontinence among first time mothers - what happens in pregnancy and the first year after delivery?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267191
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Sep;94(9):1005-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Hege Hølmo Johannessen
Arne Wibe
Arvid Stordahl
Leiv Sandvik
Siv Mørkved
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Sep;94(9):1005-13
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Fecal Incontinence - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Norway
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Puerperal Disorders - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnancy- and delivery-related factors affect postpartum anal incontinence. We aimed to explore changes in continence status among primiparas from late pregnancy through the first year postpartum.
In this prospective cohort study set in two Norwegian hospitals, 862 healthy primiparas completed questionnaires about the main outcome measure anal incontinence, including flatus incontinence and urgency, at three time points; late pregnancy, 6 and 12 months postpartum. Socioeconomic and delivery-related data were obtained from hospital records. Logistic regression analyses were applied to determine the association between continence status at 12 months postpartum, and continence status in late pregnancy, 6 months postpartum, demographic and delivery-related characteristics.
Among the 189 (22%) primiparas reporting anal incontinence in late pregnancy, 34 (18%) had persistent anal incontinence 1 year later. Forty-eight (43%) of the 113 women incontinent at 6 months postpartum experienced persistent anal incontinence at 12 months. Eight percent of previously continent women reported new onset anal incontinence at 6 and 12 months after delivery. Occipitoposterior presentation was the only delivery-related factor increasing the risk of postpartum anal incontinence [odds ratio (OR) 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-3.4]. Young age increased the risk of anal incontinence at 1 year after delivery, whereas incontinence in late pregnancy increased the risk of anal incontinence persisting through 6 and 12 months postpartum.
In most first-time mothers with postpartum anal incontinence, the onset of anal incontinence was before delivery. Except for occipitoposterior presentation, no delivery-related factors increased the risk of postpartum anal incontinence. This may indicate that hormonal, mechanical or neuromuscular changes in pregnancy affect long-term anal incontinence more than vaginal delivery.
PubMed ID
26052628 View in PubMed
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Anal sphincter rupture during delivery: philosophy of science and clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115013
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 19;133(6):652-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-19-2013
Author
Atle Fretheim
Author Affiliation
Global Health Unit, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Norway. atle.fretheim@kunnskapssenteret.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 19;133(6):652-4
Date
Mar-19-2013
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anal Canal - injuries
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Perineum
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Rupture - epidemiology - prevention & control
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 May 28;133(10):1047-823712148
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 May 28;133(10):104823712149
PubMed ID
23552161 View in PubMed
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[An analysis of the increasing incidence of complications of delivery in a surgical department]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60401
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Apr 11;145(15):1147-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-11-1983

Antecedents and neuroimaging patterns in cerebral palsy with epilepsy and cognitive impairment: a population-based study in children born at term.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284884
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2017 Jul;96(7):828-836
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Kristina Ahlin
Bo Jacobsson
Staffan Nilsson
Kate Himmelmann
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2017 Jul;96(7):828-836
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - complications - diagnostic imaging
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - complications - diagnostic imaging
Cohort Studies
Epilepsy - complications - diagnostic imaging
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Term Birth
Abstract
Antecedents of accompanying impairments in cerebral palsy and their relation to neuroimaging patterns need to be explored.
A population-based study of 309 children with cerebral palsy born at term between 1983 and 1994. Prepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum variables previously studied as antecedents of cerebral palsy type and motor severity were analyzed in children with cerebral palsy and cognitive impairment and/or epilepsy, and in children with cerebral palsy without these accompanying impairments. Neuroimaging patterns and their relation to identified antecedents were analyzed. Data were retrieved from the cerebral palsy register of western Sweden, and from obstetric and neonatal records.
Children with cerebral palsy and accompanying impairments more often had low birthweight (kg) (odds ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.3-0.8), brain maldevelopment known at birth (p = 0.007, odds ratio 8) and neonatal infection (odds ratio 5.4, 95% confidence interval 1.04-28.4). Moreover, neuroimaging patterns of maldevelopment (odds ratio 7.2, 95% confidence interval 2.9-17.2), cortical/subcortical lesions (odds ratio 5.3, 95% confidence interval 2.3-12.2) and basal ganglia lesions (odds ratio 7.6, 95% confidence interval 1.4-41.3) were more common, wheras white matter injury was found significantly less often (odds ratio 0.2, 95% confidence interval 0.1-0.5). In most children with maldevelopment, the intrapartum and postpartum periods were uneventful (p
PubMed ID
28295155 View in PubMed
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Are obstetric anal sphincter ruptures preventable?-- large and consistent rupture rate variations between the Nordic countries and between delivery units in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120162
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Jan;92(1):94-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Katariina Laine
Wenche Rotvold
Anne Cathrine Staff
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo, Norway. kattiksen@yahoo.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Jan;92(1):94-100
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Chi-Square Distribution
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Episiotomy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology
Parity
Pregnancy
Registries
Rupture
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study changes in the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter rupture (OASR) during recent years in Denmark, Finland, Sweden and Norway and hospital-based incidence in recent years in Norway.
Retrospective birth register study.
Unselected population of delivering women in four Nordic countries.
All deliveries (574 175) registered in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, 2004-2010.
Parity data, including maternal, obstetrical and fetal characteristics, were obtained. The incidence of OASR was calculated from vaginal deliveries. A chi-squared test was used to analyse differences between countries and time periods.
Incidence of OASR.
During the study period, the OASR incidence in Finland was notably lower (0.7-1.0%) than in the other three Nordic countries (4.2-2.3%). A significant and constant reduction in OASR incidence was observed in Norway only (from 4.1 to 2.3%, from 2004 to 2010, p
PubMed ID
23034015 View in PubMed
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[Are there any regional differences when it comes to obstetrical care quality?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58218
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Nov 4;101(45):3615; discussion 3616
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2004

183 records – page 1 of 19.