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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Attachment representations among substance-abusing women in transition to motherhood: implications for prenatal emotions and mother-infant interaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286943
Source
Attach Hum Dev. 2016 Aug;18(4):391-417
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Sanna Isosävi
Marjo Flykt
Ritva Belt
Tiina Posa
Saija Kuittinen
Kaija Puura
Raija-Leena Punamäki
Source
Attach Hum Dev. 2016 Aug;18(4):391-417
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cognition
Emotions
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Mother-Child Relations - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Object Attachment
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
We studied how attachment representations contribute to central components of transition to motherhood, prenatal emotion processing (EP) and emotional availability (EA) of mother-infant interaction, and whether there are group specific differences. Participants were 51 treatment-enrolled substance-abusing (SA) mothers and their infants and 50 non-using comparison dyads with obstetric risk. Mother's attachment representations (AAI) and EP were assessed prenatally and EA when infants were four months. Results showed that autonomous attachment only had a buffering effect on prenatal EP among comparisons. All SA mothers showed more dysfunctional EP than comparisons and, contrary to comparisons, autonomous SA mothers reported more negative cognitive appraisals and less meta-evaluation of emotions than dismissing SA mothers. Preoccupied SA mothers showed high negative cognitive appraisals, suggesting under-regulation of emotions. Attachment representations were not associated with EA in either group; rather, SA status contributed to global risk in the relationship. Surprisingly, autonomous SA mothers showed a tendency towards intrusiveness. We propose that obstetric risk among comparisons and adverse relational experiences among almost all SA mothers might override the protective role of mother's autonomous representations for dyadic interaction. We conclude that prenatal emotional turbulence and high interaction risk of all SA mothers calls for holistic treatment for the dyad.
PubMed ID
26978721 View in PubMed
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A comparison of mothers' and fathers' experiences of the attachment process in a neonatal intensive care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87065
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Mar;17(6):810-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Fegran Liv
Helseth Sølvi
Fagermoen May Solveig
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Sports, University of Agder, Norway. liv.fegran@hia.no
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Mar;17(6):810-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Neonatal Nursing
Norway
Object Attachment
Abstract
AIM: To compare mothers' and fathers' individual views and experiences of the attachment process in a neonatal intensive care unit within the first week after a premature birth. BACKGROUND: The attachment between parents and children is a precursor to the consolidation of parenting skills, the growth and development of the infant and the establishment of a bond between parent and child. Premature birth and the resultant hospitalization disrupt the normal attachment process between parent and child. Most of the literature on attachment theory focuses on the mother-child connection and is being criticised for regarding the father's role as supportive and peripheral. METHODS: The design of this study was descriptive with a hermeneutic approach. Twelve parents (six mothers and six fathers) in a 13-bed neonatal intensive care unit in a Norwegian regional hospital participated in a field study addressing the encounter between parents and nurses. This paper is based on the semi-structured interviews with the parents at discharge. RESULTS: The interview analysis revealed two main categories. (a) Taken by surprise: For mothers, the premature birth created a feeling of powerlessness and they experienced the immediate postnatal period as surreal and strange. The fathers experienced the birth as a shock, but were ready to be involved immediately. (b) Building a relationship: Mothers experienced a need to regain the temporarily lost relationship with their child, whereas the fathers experienced the beginning of a new relationship. CONCLUSION: Comparing parents' experiences of the attachment process within the first days after a premature birth reveals a striking contrast between the mother's experience of surrealism and the father's ability to be involved immediately after birth. Relevance to clinical practice. Parents' of premature children's different starting points should be acknowledged as professionals encourage parents to have early skin-to-skin contact with their premature infant.
PubMed ID
18279284 View in PubMed
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Emotional reactivity in infants with congenital heart defects and maternal symptoms of postnatal depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130246
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2011 Dec;14(6):487-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Øivind Solberg
Maria T Grønning Dale
Henrik Holmstrøm
Leif T Eskedal
Markus A Landolt
Margarete E Vollrath
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosomatics and Health Behaviour, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, Box 4404, 0403, Oslo, Norway. oivind.solberg@fhi.no
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2011 Dec;14(6):487-92
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - psychology
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - psychology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Mental health
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Object Attachment
Postpartum Period - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
The object of this study was to examine the role of emotional reactivity in infants with congenital heart defects (CHD) in relation to their mothers' symptoms of postnatal depression. The study population was drawn from the Norwegian country-wide CHD registry from the Department of Pediatric Cardiology at Oslo University Hospital and the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Mother-infant dyads with mild/moderate or severe CHD (n=242) were assessed with a 6-item short version (EPDS-6) of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Infant Characteristic Questionnaire's fussy/difficult subscale (ICQ-D/F-7) at 6 months postpartum. When adjusting for infant emotional reactivity, mothers of infants with severe CHD showed significantly elevated symptoms of postnatal depression 6 months postpartum (odds ratio=2.22) compared to the mothers of infants with mild/moderate CHD. The results identify severe CHD in infants as a predictor of heightened symptoms of postnatal depression in mothers, independent of the infant's emotional reactivity. Although a causal direction underlying the association could not be determined, the possible, negative reciprocal relationships between severe CHD in infants, high levels of emotional reactivity in infants, and symptoms of maternal postnatal depression are considered.
PubMed ID
22020995 View in PubMed
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[Establishment of the mother-infant and father-infant relationship in the perinatal period].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174139
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2004 Jul-Aug;1(6):12-4, 16-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Linda Bell
Céline Goulet
Denise St-Cyr Tribble
Denise Paul
Author Affiliation
Département des sciences infirmières, Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2004 Jul-Aug;1(6):12-4, 16-22
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child Psychology
Emotions
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Nursing
Models, Psychological
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Postpartum Period - psychology
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Touch
Abstract
This qualitative and longitudinal study aims at defining a model of early parent-infant relationships in the perinatal period. Eighteen parental couples were interviewed. The resulting model is based on five themes in the parent-infant relationship, i.e. discovery of the infant, physical proximity, emotional closeness, initiation of complementary interactions and personal commitment to the parental role. The article clearly shows the differences between mothers' and fathers' experiences in developing these relationships with their infant. The nurse's assessment of early parent-infant relationships and her interventions are discussed in a second article, p. 32.
PubMed ID
15984285 View in PubMed
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Mothers' lived experiences of co-care and part-care after birth, and their strong desire to be close to their baby.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58166
Source
Midwifery. 2005 Jun;21(2):131-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Kerstin Erlandsson
Ingegerd Fagerberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences, Mälardalen University, Box 833, S-721 23 Västerås, Sweden. kerstin.erlandsson@mdh.se
Source
Midwifery. 2005 Jun;21(2):131-8
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - therapy
Infant, Premature
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Mothers - psychology
Object Attachment
Patient Participation
Rooming-in Care
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe how mothers of premature or sick mature babies, experienced the care and their own state of health after birth in postnatal care in a neonatal co-care ward. DESIGN: A Husserlian phenomenology method inspired by Giorgi was used. Six mothers were interviewed using a semi-structured, open-ended interview guide. SETTING: A neonatal ward using a concept of co-care for premature or sick mature babies and their mothers. FINDINGS: In essence, mothers felt that, whatever the circumstances, they wanted to be close to their babies. It was the mother's experience that the organisation, staff or other circumstances prolonged the separation from her baby. The mother experienced the separation from the baby intensely during the first days after birth (even for a short period of time); after returning home, they had still not come to terms with it. The mothers regarded the entire stay in hospital as one event; they did not differentiate between wards or ward staff in the delivery, maternity or neonatal wards. All mothers in the study had, therefore, also experienced part-care for shorter or longer periods when separated from their baby, being then later reunited in co-care. CONCLUSION: This study can be used as a basis for discussion on more individualised care through co-operation and organisation between delivery, maternity and neonatal wards, in order to reduce the amount of time mother and baby are separated.
PubMed ID
15878428 View in PubMed
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Mothers with intellectual disability, their experiences of maltreatment, and their children's attachment representations: a small-group matched comparison study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266367
Source
Attach Hum Dev. 2014;16(5):417-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Pehr Granqvist
Tommie Forslund
Mari Fransson
Lydia Springer
Lene Lindberg
Source
Attach Hum Dev. 2014;16(5):417-36
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Object Attachment
Parenting
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Violence
Abstract
Maternal intellectual disability (ID) is regarded a risk factor in child development, but there is no scientific evidence on maternal ID in relation to children's attachment. Using a matched comparison design, a small group (n = 23) of mothers diagnosed with ID was studied to help fill this gap. Besides maternal ID, we examined the role of abuse/trauma/maltreatment (ATM) in the mothers' biographies, along with potential confounds. Comparison group mothers (n = 25) had normal variations in intelligence and matched mothers with ID on residential area, income, child age, and sex. History of maternal ATM was assessed using a semi-structured interview and was found to be significantly more likely in the ID group mothers' experience than the comparison group mothers. Children's (M age = 77 months) attachment representations were assessed with the Separation Anxiety Test. Among children of mothers with ID, a substantial minority (35%) had a secure and the vast majority (>80%) an organized attachment representation. Mothers with ID who had suffered elevated ATM were significantly more likely to have children who were scored high on disorganization and insecurity. We discuss possible implications of our findings for societal considerations regarding parenting and child attachment in the context of parental ID status.
PubMed ID
24931835 View in PubMed
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Postpartum depression among first-time mothers - results from a parallel randomised trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269995
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2015 Jun;6(2):95-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Rikke D Maimburg
Michael Vaeth
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2015 Jun;6(2):95-100
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Delivery, Obstetric
Denmark
Depression, Postpartum - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Mothers - psychology
Object Attachment
Parity
Pregnancy
Premature Birth
Prenatal Care - methods
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To compare the risk of postpartum depression among nulliparous women enrolled in a structured antenatal programme, with nulliparous women allocated to standard care as well as to identify obstetric characteristics in women at risk of developing postpartum depression.
A randomised controlled trial involving 1193 Danish nulliparous women. A total of 603 women attended the "Ready for Child program" and 590 received standard care. Data were collected from the ongoing local birth cohort at Aarhus University Hospital and from questionnaires mailed to the women attending the study.
No difference in postpartum depression was found between those who attended the intervention group and the reference group. Overall, being at risk of postpartum depression was associated with preterm birth, unscheduled caesarean section, low Apgar score, lack of pain relief during labour, experienced low attendance of the midwife in the delivery room, unprepared for hospital discharge, none or minor breastfeeding in the early postpartum period, insufficient knowledge about breastfeeding, poor or fair self-rated mental health, and uncertain or weak attachment to the newborn child.
The findings suggest that a short general antenatal programme in pregnancy may not be sufficient to prevent postpartum depression six weeks after birth. However, there are several risk factors during the birth process and the early postpartum period that can help identify women at risk for developing depression.
PubMed ID
25998877 View in PubMed
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Psychometric properties of the attachment style questionnaire in Swedish pregnant women: short and full versions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301628
Source
J Reprod Infant Psychol. 2017 11; 35(5):450-461
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2017
Author
Cathrine Axfors
Sara Sylvén
Alkistis Skalkidou
Mia Ramklint
Author Affiliation
a Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
J Reprod Infant Psychol. 2017 11; 35(5):450-461
Date
11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Mothers - psychology
Object Attachment
Pregnancy
Psychometrics - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Translations
Abstract
(i) To evaluate the reliability and factor structure of the Attachment Style Questionnaire - Short Form (ASQ-SF) for use in pregnant women and (ii) to compare the reliability and factor structure of the short- and full version-ASQ among pregnant women.
Adult attachment insecurity is currently included as a major risk factor in studies of perinatal health. None of the self-report measures with a Swedish translation have been psychometrically evaluated in a pregnant cohort.
A population-based cohort of 1631 pregnant women answered the ASQ in late pregnancy. Internal consistency (item-subscale correlations, Cronbach's a, and a if item deleted) was evaluated for the seven available subscales. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was run to examine the factor structure of the short form compared with the full-version. Test-retest correlations were assessed in a subgroup (n = 48).
All mean item-subscale correlations for the ASQ-SF were > 0.30. Cronbach's a's for ASQ-SF dimensions were as follows: Avoidance (0.87); Anxiety (0.89); Discomfort with Closeness (0.85); Relationships as Secondary (0.54); Confidence (0.83); Need for Approval (0.76); and Preoccupation with Relationships (0.77). No item removal substantively increased subscale a's. The CFA demonstrated better model fit for the ASQ-SF than for the full-version ASQ, while other reliability measures were similar. Test-retest correlations ranged from 0.65 to 0.84.
The ASQ-SF showed similar psychometric properties in pregnant women as in the general population and had good reliability, but the optimal factor structure needs to be studied further. Results support the usage of the ASQ-SF in pregnant cohorts.
PubMed ID
29517387 View in PubMed
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A theoretical model of parents' experiences of threat of preterm birth in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93977
Source
Midwifery. 2008 Dec;24(4):416-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Danerek Margaretha
Dykes Anna-Karin
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Midwifery. 2008 Dec;24(4):416-24
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anecdotes as Topic
Anxiety - prevention & control
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Male
Mothers - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Object Attachment
Parents - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - psychology
Premature Birth - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: to gain a deeper understanding of both parents' experiences during the mother's stay in hospital for threat of an early delivery and eventual preterm birth. DESIGN: explanatory design with separate interviews for mothers and fathers using the grounded theory method. SETTING: University Hospital in southern Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 17 mothers and six fathers, who had experienced a threat of early delivery and eventual preterm birth, while the mother was in hospital. FINDINGS: the core category 'inter-adapting' and the following three categories and six subcategories emerged: interacting (communicating with the professional caregivers; keeping the family together through a stressful situation; seeking empowerment during labour and birth); reorganising (arranging for a new family situation); and caring (accepting the restrictions for the health of the fetus; reaching out to the baby and taking part in the care). KEY CONCLUSIONS: during the mothers' stay in hospital, the most stressful issues experienced were the parents' concern for the baby and the separation from the family. Parents are able to manage the situation by mutually adapting to each other, family members, significant others and caregivers. A new concept 'inter-adapting' therefore emerged. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: for perinatal care, feelings of separation can be reduced and family bonds strengthened through integrating the different wards involved.
PubMed ID
17936459 View in PubMed
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Traditional breastfeeding practices of the Ojibwe of Northern Minnesota.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185386
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Jan;24(1):49-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Joan Dodgson
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA. dodgs001@mc.duke.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Jan;24(1):49-61
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Feeding - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant Care - methods
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Minnesota
Mother-Child Relations - ethnology
Mothers - psychology
Object Attachment
Questionnaires
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Ojibwe have transitioned over the past 100 years from a woodland people moving with the seasons, to forced confinement on rural reservations, to inner-city poverty. Traditionally, Ojibwe women's knowledge has been passed through the generations orally. Using ethnographic methods, data were gathered on traditional infant feeding practices from Ojibwe women (N = 44). Few of these traditions have been documented previously. Some traditions are similar to other indigenous cultures while others are culturally specific. Understanding traditional breastfeeding practices can provide valuable information for those working with indigenous people in a variety of settings, so that they create services that are consistent with traditional values.
PubMed ID
12746031 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.