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18 records – page 1 of 2.

Associations between attachment-related symptoms and later psychological problems among international adoptees: results from the FinAdo study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277741
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Feb;56(1):53-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Marko Elovainio
Hanna Raaska
Jari Sinkkonen
Sanna Mäkipää
Helena Lapinleimu
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Feb;56(1):53-61
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adoption - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Emotions
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Object Attachment
Reactive Attachment Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
We examined the associations between attachment-related symptoms (symptoms of reactive attachment disorder (RAD), symptoms of disinhibited social engagement disorder (DSED), and clinging) and later psychological problems among international adoptees. The study population comprised internationally adopted children (591 boys and 768 girls, 6-15 years) from the ongoing Finnish Adoption (FinAdo) study. Data were gathered with self-administered questionnaires both from adoptive parents and from adoptees aged over 9 years. Attachment-related symptoms were measured using of a short (8-item) questionnaire and later behavioral/emotional problems were assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Five to Fifteen (FTF) scale for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. RAD and DSED symptom subscales were associated with an increased risk of emotional and behavioral problems and ADHD. Especially the mixed type of attachment-related symptoms was strongly associated with later emotional and behavioral problems.
PubMed ID
25352377 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between loneliness, depressive symptoms and perceived togetherness in older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172486
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2005 Nov;9(6):526-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
P. Tiikkainen
R-L Heikkinen
Author Affiliation
The Finnish Research Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. pirjo.tiikkainen@jypoly.fi
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2005 Nov;9(6):526-34
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Object Attachment
Personality Inventory
Risk factors
Social Environment
Social Identification
Social Perception
Social Support
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This study explores the associations of loneliness with depressive symptoms in a five-year follow-up and describes how the six dimensions of perceived togetherness explain loneliness and depressive symptoms at baseline. The data were collected on 207 residents of Jyväskylä, central Finland, who at baseline in 1990 were aged 80; and 133 residents who at follow-up in 1995 were aged 85. Loneliness was assessed using a questionnaire item with four preset response options, perceived togetherness using the Social Provisions Scale, and depressive symptoms using the CES-D scale. A recursive structural equation model showed that in women but not in men, depressive symptoms predicted more experiences of loneliness. Those who were lonely were more depressed (CES-D score 16 or over) and experienced less togetherness than those who were not. Loneliness was explained by reliable alliance, social integration and attachment; and depressive symptoms were explained by guidance, reassurance of worth, reliable alliance and attachment. A common feature in both loneliness and depressive symptoms was a lower level of perceived emotional togetherness in social interaction.
PubMed ID
16214700 View in PubMed
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Attachment representations among substance-abusing women in transition to motherhood: implications for prenatal emotions and mother-infant interaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286943
Source
Attach Hum Dev. 2016 Aug;18(4):391-417
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Sanna Isosävi
Marjo Flykt
Ritva Belt
Tiina Posa
Saija Kuittinen
Kaija Puura
Raija-Leena Punamäki
Source
Attach Hum Dev. 2016 Aug;18(4):391-417
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cognition
Emotions
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Mother-Child Relations - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Object Attachment
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
We studied how attachment representations contribute to central components of transition to motherhood, prenatal emotion processing (EP) and emotional availability (EA) of mother-infant interaction, and whether there are group specific differences. Participants were 51 treatment-enrolled substance-abusing (SA) mothers and their infants and 50 non-using comparison dyads with obstetric risk. Mother's attachment representations (AAI) and EP were assessed prenatally and EA when infants were four months. Results showed that autonomous attachment only had a buffering effect on prenatal EP among comparisons. All SA mothers showed more dysfunctional EP than comparisons and, contrary to comparisons, autonomous SA mothers reported more negative cognitive appraisals and less meta-evaluation of emotions than dismissing SA mothers. Preoccupied SA mothers showed high negative cognitive appraisals, suggesting under-regulation of emotions. Attachment representations were not associated with EA in either group; rather, SA status contributed to global risk in the relationship. Surprisingly, autonomous SA mothers showed a tendency towards intrusiveness. We propose that obstetric risk among comparisons and adverse relational experiences among almost all SA mothers might override the protective role of mother's autonomous representations for dyadic interaction. We conclude that prenatal emotional turbulence and high interaction risk of all SA mothers calls for holistic treatment for the dyad.
PubMed ID
26978721 View in PubMed
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Clinging to closeness: The parental view on developing a close bond with their infants in a NICU.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295267
Source
Midwifery. 2018 Jul; 62:183-188
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Heli Mäkelä
Anna Axelin
Nancy Feeley
Hannakaisa Niela-Vilén
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland; Satakunta Hospital District, 28500 Pori, Finland. Electronic address: heli.makela@satshp.fi.
Source
Midwifery. 2018 Jul; 62:183-188
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - organization & administration
Male
Object Attachment
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Qualitative Research
Smartphone
Abstract
To identify and understand how parents develop a close bond to their infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).
A qualitative descriptive study; closeness and separation stories recorded in a smartphone application by the parents were analyzed using thematic analysis.
Twenty-three parents of nineteen infants who were taken care of in a level III NICU in Finland.
Bonding moments and a disrupted dyadic parent-infant relationship continuously alternated as in a rollercoaster ride during the hospital stay. Transitions from closeness to separation and vice versa were the most emotional stages on the journey. Parents had a natural desire to be close and create a bond with their infants; however, they accepted the separation as part of NICU care.
The findings indicate that closeness with their infant was the power that parents stored and that led them through unavoidable separation to normal parenthood.
Bonding and attachment will occur naturally if parents are close to their infants and permitted privacy and time with their infants. NICU staff should create a peaceful and calming environment that enables and supports this bonding process.
PubMed ID
29684798 View in PubMed
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The design and development of the father-child instrument (FCI) for assessing the characteristics of fathers' availability and engagement with their preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149650
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2010 Jun;4(2):145-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Nina Halme
Marja-Terttu Tarkka
Eija Paavilainen
Tapio Nummi
Päivi Astedt-Kurki
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Finland. nina.halme@thl.fi
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2010 Jun;4(2):145-56
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Humans
Intergenerational Relations
Male
Object Attachment
Parenting
Paternal Behavior
Questionnaires
Abstract
Despite the fact that father-child involvement has extensive effects on the health and well-being of the family, there is a paucity of research on fathers' presence in health care research. The design and development of an instrument for assessing the characteristics of fathers' availability and engagement with their preschool-aged children in Finland is presented. Data collection was undertaken in two separate periods involving 263 and 821 fathers. Results indicate that the father-child instrument (FCI) is ready for use in research seeking to assess fathers' availability and engagement with their preschoolers. Further research is nonetheless required to assess the potential for a more sensitive interaction and for the generalization of the FCI.
PubMed ID
19605380 View in PubMed
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Fathers' and mothers' attachment representations as predictors of preadolescents' attachment security: A ten-year follow-up of Finnish families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278643
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Oct;56(5):527-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Anna M Kouvo
Marinus Voeten
Maarit Silvén
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Oct;56(5):527-36
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Development
Father-Child Relations
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Object Attachment
Abstract
The question of how mothers' and fathers' representations of attachment correlate ten years later with children's perceptions of attachment relationships was examined in a longitudinal study on Finnish families (N = 42). The parents completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) during the child's first year of life. At 11 years, the children filled out three scales on how secure they perceive the relationship with each parent. Parents' AAI classifications and AAI dimensions based on continuous scales were used as predictors of the preadolescents' attachment security. Regression analyses demonstrated that fathers' but not mothers' State-of-Mind and Experience dimensions predicted preadolescents' security of attachment to father. The discussion focuses on the predictive validity of the classical categorical versus the recently proposed continuous approach and the different roles of parents in transmitting security from one generation to another.
PubMed ID
26122276 View in PubMed
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[Gallery. Esko Männikkö: Kuivaniemi, Christmas].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181609
Source
Duodecim. 2003;119(23):2315
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Maritta Mellais
Source
Duodecim. 2003;119(23):2315
Date
2003
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
History, 20th Century
Humans
Object Attachment
Photography - history
Seasons
PubMed ID
14768259 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Infant care by mothers in the patient's room in Ward 3B of Tampere University Hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221187
Source
Katilolehti. 1993 May;98(3):15-6, 21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993

Longitudinal Associations of Explosive and Adventurous Temperament Profiles With Character Development: The Modifying Effects of Social Support and Attachment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302895
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2018 Mar/Apr; 79(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Aino I L Saarinen
Tom H Rosenström
Christian A Hakulinen
Claude Robert Cloninger
Mirka H M Hintsanen
Laura M Pulkki-Råback
Terho Lehtimäki
Olli T Raitakari
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2018 Mar/Apr; 79(2):
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Object Attachment
Personality - physiology
Registries
Social Class
Social Support
Temperament - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine (a) whether adventurous and explosive temperament profiles (presumed precursors of antisocial and borderline personality) are associated with character traits over a 15-year follow-up and (b) whether social support and attachment security modify the relationship between temperament profiles and character development.
2,028 subjects of the Young Finns study completed the Temperament and Character Inventory, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and the Relationship Questionnaire at 3 assessment points between 1997 and 2012.
Both explosive and adventurous temperament profiles seemed to predispose individuals to have less mature personalities; that is, these profiles were consistently associated with lower cooperativeness (P
PubMed ID
29469244 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.