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Adjusting to being a father to an infant born prematurely: experiences from Swedish fathers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86951
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Lindberg Birgitta
Axelsson Karin
Ohrling Kerstin
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. birgitta.lindberg@ltu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Gender Identity
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Intensive Care, Neonatal - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Narration
Neonatal Nursing
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Paternal Behavior
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of being a father to a prematurely born infant. Eight fathers of prematurely born children were interviewed using a narrative approach, and a thematic content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The fathers described that the preterm birth gave them the chance to get to know their infant as they had to spend time at the intensive care unit. They also felt better educated by professionals who helped them take care of their infant. Their feelings and attachment for their infant increased over time and the fathers felt that they had a stronger bond with their child compared with friends who had babies born at term. As time passed, they became more confident as a father. In spite of the strain, the experience made them change as a person and they expressed having different values. The relationship with their partner was strengthened as they handled this situation together as a couple. However, the fathers felt fortunate despite everything and described having managed a prematurely born infant rather well. Although there are similarities between being a father to a child born at term and to one born preterm, it is significant to gain further knowledge about the specific experiences of fathers of prematurely born infants. The results of this study have implications for nurses working with families who have children born prematurely.
PubMed ID
18269426 View in PubMed
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Association between parental depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with the infant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279029
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):87-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Birgitta Kerstis
Clara Aarts
Carin Tillman
Hanna Persson
Gabriella Engström
Birgitta Edlund
John Öhrvik
Sara Sylvén
Alkistis Skalkidou
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):87-94
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child of Impaired Parents
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Object Attachment
Prenatal Care
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Impaired bonding with the infant is associated with maternal postpartum depression but has not been investigated extensively in fathers. The primary study aim was to evaluate associations between maternal and paternal depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with their infant. A secondary aim was to determine the associations between parents' marital problems and impaired bonding with the infant. The study is part of a population-based cohort project (UPPSAT) in Uppsala, Sweden. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum and the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire at 6 months postpartum were completed by 727 couples. The prevalence of impaired bonding was highest among couples in which both spouses had depressive symptoms. Impaired bonding was associated with higher EPDS scores in both mothers and fathers, as well as with experiencing a deteriorated marital relationship. The association between maternal and paternal impaired bonding and the mothers' and fathers' EPDS scores remained significant even after adjustment for relevant confounding factors. Depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum are associated with impaired bonding with the infant at 6 months postpartum for both mothers and fathers. It is critical to screen for and prevent depressive symptoms in both parents during early parenthood.
PubMed ID
25854998 View in PubMed
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A concept analysis of parent-infant attachment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203737
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1998 Nov;28(5):1071-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
C. Goulet
L. Bell
D. St-Cyr
D. Paul
A. Lang
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1998 Nov;28(5):1071-81
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Father-Child Relations
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Child Nursing
Models, Theoretical
Mother-Child Relations
Nursing Theory
Object Attachment
Parent-Child Relations
Quebec
Abstract
A concept analysis, the clarification of a concept, is the first step towards building the foundations of nursing theory, research and practice. As a relevant concept for nurses working with childbearing families, parent-infant attachment is an important part of the body of nursing knowledge. Wilson's method of concept analysis was used to generate antecedents, critical attributes and consequences of parent-infant attachment, highlighting the need to refine measurements of this concept.
PubMed ID
9840879 View in PubMed
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Contact between mother, child and partner and attitudes towards breastfeeding in relation to mode of delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138930
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2010 Feb;1(1):27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Anna-Karin Klint Carlander
Gunnar Edman
Kyllike Christensson
Ellika Andolf
Ingela Wiklund
Author Affiliation
Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anna-karin.klint@ki.se
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2010 Feb;1(1):27-34
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Breast Feeding - psychology
Breech Presentation
Cesarean Section - psychology
Delivery, Obstetric - psychology
Father-Child Relations
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Object Attachment
Pregnancy
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate contact between mothers and their newborn child and study if there are differences between those who requested an elective caesarean section compared to women who had a vaginal birth and those who underwent an elective caesarean section due to obstetrical indication. The psychometric properties of a scale that measure the contact between mother and child were also investigated.
A prospective cohort study.
Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
510 primiparas from three groups: women undergoing caesarean section on maternal request (n=96), women undergoing caesarean section on obstetrical indication (n=116) and women planning a vaginal delivery (n=198). The later were further divided into subgroups; women who underwent assisted vaginal delivery (n=35) and women who had an emergency caesarean section (n=65).
The instrument used was the Alliance Scale.
The contact between mother and child in relation to mode of delivery.
The contact with the child was rated as positive on all occasions: there were no significant differences between the groups. The relation to the partner was rated as positive at all occasions. Mothers with a vaginal delivery experienced breastfeeding less stressful than the mothers with a caesarean delivery. Three and nine months after delivery the mothers with a caesarean delivery on request reported more breastfeeding problems than mothers in the other groups. Mothers with a vaginal delivery rated less sadness at every occasion.
Mode of delivery does not seem to affect how mothers experience their contact towards the newborn child.
PubMed ID
21122593 View in PubMed
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The design and development of the father-child instrument (FCI) for assessing the characteristics of fathers' availability and engagement with their preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149650
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2010 Jun;4(2):145-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Nina Halme
Marja-Terttu Tarkka
Eija Paavilainen
Tapio Nummi
Päivi Astedt-Kurki
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Finland. nina.halme@thl.fi
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2010 Jun;4(2):145-56
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Humans
Intergenerational Relations
Male
Object Attachment
Parenting
Paternal Behavior
Questionnaires
Abstract
Despite the fact that father-child involvement has extensive effects on the health and well-being of the family, there is a paucity of research on fathers' presence in health care research. The design and development of an instrument for assessing the characteristics of fathers' availability and engagement with their preschool-aged children in Finland is presented. Data collection was undertaken in two separate periods involving 263 and 821 fathers. Results indicate that the father-child instrument (FCI) is ready for use in research seeking to assess fathers' availability and engagement with their preschoolers. Further research is nonetheless required to assess the potential for a more sensitive interaction and for the generalization of the FCI.
PubMed ID
19605380 View in PubMed
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[Establishment of the mother-infant and father-infant relationship in the perinatal period].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174139
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2004 Jul-Aug;1(6):12-4, 16-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Linda Bell
Céline Goulet
Denise St-Cyr Tribble
Denise Paul
Author Affiliation
Département des sciences infirmières, Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2004 Jul-Aug;1(6):12-4, 16-22
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child Psychology
Emotions
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Nursing
Models, Psychological
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Postpartum Period - psychology
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Touch
Abstract
This qualitative and longitudinal study aims at defining a model of early parent-infant relationships in the perinatal period. Eighteen parental couples were interviewed. The resulting model is based on five themes in the parent-infant relationship, i.e. discovery of the infant, physical proximity, emotional closeness, initiation of complementary interactions and personal commitment to the parental role. The article clearly shows the differences between mothers' and fathers' experiences in developing these relationships with their infant. The nurse's assessment of early parent-infant relationships and her interventions are discussed in a second article, p. 32.
PubMed ID
15984285 View in PubMed
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Experiences of the first year as father.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86954
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):56-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Premberg Asa
Hellström Anna-Lena
Berg Marie
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. asa.premberg@vgregion.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):56-63
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Family Leave
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - education - psychology
Gender Identity
Happiness
Health education
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Infant
Life Change Events
Male
Marriage - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Parenting - psychology
Paternal Behavior
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The importance of fathers' participation for development of the child and the well-being of the family is recognized from earlier research. In Sweden, legislation allows fathers to share the parental leave equally with the mother even so fathers only use a small of their paid leave. The aim of the study was to explore experiences of the first year as a father. METHOD: A phenomenological life world approach was used. Ethical approval was obtained. Ten men, recruited by a purposive sample, were interviewed 12-14 months after the delivery of their first child. The data collection was performed during June and August 2004 in the south-west area of Sweden. FINDINGS: The essence of the experiences of the first year as father was to place the baby in the centre without giving up one's own person. The child provided warmth and happiness in the family and men experienced a deeper relationship to their partner. The contact between father and child was facilitated by engagement and time spent alone with the child. The major constituents identified from the findings were 'To be overwhelmed', 'To master the new situation' and 'To get a new completeness in life'. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: To master fatherhood maintenance of integrity and possibility to develop an independent relationship with the child is important. Fathers are invited to participate in postnatal childbirth education but the activities address women's needs and it is doubtful if the fathers benefit from participation. Though fathers entered the delivery room some decades ago, as a support to the woman, health personnel of today must be aware of fathers' own needs and the impact gender aspects have on their professional support.
PubMed ID
18269423 View in PubMed
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Fathers' and mothers' attachment representations as predictors of preadolescents' attachment security: A ten-year follow-up of Finnish families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278643
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Oct;56(5):527-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Anna M Kouvo
Marinus Voeten
Maarit Silvén
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Oct;56(5):527-36
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Development
Father-Child Relations
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Object Attachment
Abstract
The question of how mothers' and fathers' representations of attachment correlate ten years later with children's perceptions of attachment relationships was examined in a longitudinal study on Finnish families (N = 42). The parents completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) during the child's first year of life. At 11 years, the children filled out three scales on how secure they perceive the relationship with each parent. Parents' AAI classifications and AAI dimensions based on continuous scales were used as predictors of the preadolescents' attachment security. Regression analyses demonstrated that fathers' but not mothers' State-of-Mind and Experience dimensions predicted preadolescents' security of attachment to father. The discussion focuses on the predictive validity of the classical categorical versus the recently proposed continuous approach and the different roles of parents in transmitting security from one generation to another.
PubMed ID
26122276 View in PubMed
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Father/son relationship during the preschool years. An integrative review with special reference to recent Swedish findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40002
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Dec;68(6):399-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
P. Nettelbladt
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Dec;68(6):399-407
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Father-Child Relations
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Male
Object Attachment
Oedipus Complex
Personality Development
Psychoanalytic Theory
Sweden
Abstract
This review is an attempt to integrate Anglo-American and Swedish studies on father/son relationships. The puerperal period, infancy and early childhood are surveyed. Swedish studies do not support specific stereotyped bonding in the puerperal period. The review confirms the bidirectional nature of the father/son relationship. Thus, counteridentification, i.e. the father's identification with his son, and identification during the oedipal phase, i.e. the son's identification with his father, seem to be essential components in the father/son relationship. However, studies on parent-infant behaviour indicate that different parental roles exist early in infancy. Also, attachment studies point to the specificity of the father/son relationship before the oedipal phase. It is concluded that the major importance of the father/son relationship during the preschool years is to facilitate the son's masculine identification.
PubMed ID
6666637 View in PubMed
Less detail

First-time fathers' experiences of childbirth--a phenomenological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140001
Source
Midwifery. 2011 Dec;27(6):848-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Åsa Premberg
Gunilla Carlsson
Anna-Lena Hellström
Marie Berg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Box 457, 40530 Göteborg, Sweden. asa.premberg@gu.se
Source
Midwifery. 2011 Dec;27(6):848-53
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Object Attachment
Parturition - psychology
Postnatal Care - methods
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - methods
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To describe fathers' experiences during childbirth.
Qualitative method with phenomenological lifeworld approach. A re-enactment interview method, with open-ended questions analysed with a phenomenological method, was used.
10 First-time fathers from two hospitals were interviewed four to six weeks after childbirth in Southwest Sweden during the autumn of 2008.
The essential meaning of first-time fathers' lived experience of childbirth was described as an interwoven process pendulating between euphoria and agony. The four themes constituting the essence was: 'a process into the unknown', 'a mutually shared experience', 'to guard and support the woman' and 'in an exposed position with hidden strong emotions'.
Childbirth was experienced as a mutually shared process for the couple. The fathers' high involvement in childbirth, in cooperation with the midwife, and being engaged in support and care for his partner in her suffering is fulfilling for both partners, although the experience of the woman's pain, fear of the unknown and the gendered preconceptions of masculine hegemony can be difficult to bear for the father-to-be.
In order to maintain and strengthen childbirth as a mutually shared experience for the couple, the father needs to be recognised and supported as a parent-to-be. Midwives have to acknowledge fathers as valued participants and support their significant position.
PubMed ID
20956030 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.