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Interlinkages between attachment and the Five-Factor Model of personality in middle childhood and young adulthood: a longitudinal approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116569
Source
Attach Hum Dev. 2013;15(2):219-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mari Fransson
Pehr Granqvist
Gunilla Bohlin
Berit Hagekull
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Mari.Fransson@psyk.uu.se
Source
Attach Hum Dev. 2013;15(2):219-39
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety, Separation
Child
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Psychological
Object Attachment
Personality
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In this paper, we examine concurrent and prospective links between attachment and the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality from middle childhood to young adulthood (n = 66). At age 8.5 years, attachment was measured with the Separation Anxiety Test and at 21 years with the Adult Attachment Interview, whereas the personality dimensions were assessed with questionnaires at both time points. The results showed that attachment and personality dimensions are meaningfully related, concurrently and longitudinally. Attachment security in middle childhood was positively related to extraversion and openness, both concurrently and prospectively. Unresolved/disorganized (U/d) attachment was negatively related to conscientiousness and positively related to openness in young adulthood. U/d attachment showed a unique contribution to openness above the observed temporal stability of openness. As attachment security was also associated with openness, the duality of this factor is discussed together with other theoretical considerations regarding attachment theory in relation to the FFM.
PubMed ID
23383760 View in PubMed
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Mothers with intellectual disability, their experiences of maltreatment, and their children's attachment representations: a small-group matched comparison study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266367
Source
Attach Hum Dev. 2014;16(5):417-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Pehr Granqvist
Tommie Forslund
Mari Fransson
Lydia Springer
Lene Lindberg
Source
Attach Hum Dev. 2014;16(5):417-36
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Object Attachment
Parenting
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Violence
Abstract
Maternal intellectual disability (ID) is regarded a risk factor in child development, but there is no scientific evidence on maternal ID in relation to children's attachment. Using a matched comparison design, a small group (n = 23) of mothers diagnosed with ID was studied to help fill this gap. Besides maternal ID, we examined the role of abuse/trauma/maltreatment (ATM) in the mothers' biographies, along with potential confounds. Comparison group mothers (n = 25) had normal variations in intelligence and matched mothers with ID on residential area, income, child age, and sex. History of maternal ATM was assessed using a semi-structured interview and was found to be significantly more likely in the ID group mothers' experience than the comparison group mothers. Children's (M age = 77 months) attachment representations were assessed with the Separation Anxiety Test. Among children of mothers with ID, a substantial minority (35%) had a secure and the vast majority (>80%) an organized attachment representation. Mothers with ID who had suffered elevated ATM were significantly more likely to have children who were scored high on disorganization and insecurity. We discuss possible implications of our findings for societal considerations regarding parenting and child attachment in the context of parental ID status.
PubMed ID
24931835 View in PubMed
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