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Alcohol and substance abuse, depression and suicide attempts after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281902
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
O. Backman
D. Stockeld
F. Rasmussen
E. Näslund
R. Marsk
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastric Bypass - psychology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Small studies suggest that subjects who have undergone bariatric surgery are at increased risk of suicide, alcohol and substance use disorders. This population-based cohort study aimed to assess the incidence of treatment for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and attempted suicide after primary Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
All patients who underwent primary RYGB in Sweden between 2001 and 2010 were included. Incidence of hospital admission for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and suicide attempt was measured, along with the number of drugs prescribed. This cohort was compared with a large age-matched, non-obese reference cohort based on the Swedish population. Inpatient care and prescribed drugs registers were used.
Before RYGB surgery, women, but not men, were at higher risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use disorder compared with the reference cohort. After surgery, this was the case for both sexes. The risk of being diagnosed and treated for depression remained raised after surgery. Suicide attempts were significantly increased after RYGB. The adjusted hazard ratio for attempted suicide in the RYGB cohort after surgery compared with the general non-obese population was 2·85 (95 per cent c.i. 2·40 to 3·39).
Patients who have undergone RYGB are at an increased risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use, with an increased rate of attempted suicide compared with a non-obese general population cohort.
PubMed ID
27467694 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 2011 Feb;107(2):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011

[Liposuction--six years experience in Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229034
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 May 23;87(21):1873-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-1990
Author
I. Niechajev
Author Affiliation
Lidingö-kliniken, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 May 23;87(21):1873-6
Date
May-23-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Lipectomy - adverse effects - methods
Male
Obesity - psychology - surgery
Postoperative Complications
Surgery, Plastic - methods
Sweden
PubMed ID
2362476 View in PubMed
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[Quality of life of bariatric and body contouring].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279831
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 May 11;177(20)
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-11-2015
Author
Lotte Poulsen
Kirsten Kaya Roessler
Michael Rose
Vivi Bakholdt
Jens Ahm Sørensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 May 11;177(20)
Date
May-11-2015
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bariatric Surgery - psychology
Denmark
Dermatologic Surgical Procedures
Humans
Obesity - psychology - surgery
Patient Outcome Assessment
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
Translations
Weight Loss
Abstract
Surgical treatment of obesity has led to a large group of patients with massive weight loss. The massive weight loss results in excessive skin, which leads to pain, skin problems, cosmetic discomfort and psychosocial issues. The impact on quality of life of bariatric and body contouring surgery can be measured by patient-specific, well-constructed psychometrically validated patient-reported outcome measures. A new patient-reported outcome measure, the Body-Q, has been translated for use in Danish patients.
PubMed ID
25967248 View in PubMed
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"Then I Can Become Very Ill": Women's Experiences of Living With Irreversible Changes in Their Viscera.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283122
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2016 Jun;37(6):599-619
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Karen Synne Groven
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2016 Jun;37(6):599-619
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adaptation, Psychological
Body mass index
Eating
Fear
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Gastric Bypass - adverse effects - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Norway
Obesity - psychology - surgery
Qualitative Research
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Over the past 5 years, interest in weight-loss surgery has increased in tandem with the growing obesity epidemic in both Western and developing countries. In particular, scholars have documented the health promoting aspects of weight-loss surgery. Nevertheless, few researchers have explored the side effects, most prominently "dumping," that frequently accompany weight-loss surgery. Building on the one previous qualitative study of dumping, I focused my research for this article on the challenges associated with limiting food intake. Based on interviews with 22 Norwegian women, all of whom had undergone the gastric-bypass procedure, I concluded that the women who had a history of struggling with overeating found adjusting their food intake after the surgery particularly challenging. Appropriate personalized support for individuals struggling to establish new eating habits after the surgery requires a thorough understanding of the challenges associated with adjusting food intake. In this context, the findings of this article should be of interest to an international audience.
PubMed ID
25101876 View in PubMed
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