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Accuracy of self-reported body weight compared to measured body weight. A population survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235826
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
L. Jalkanen
J. Tuomilehto
A. Tanskanen
P. Puska
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Blood pressure
Body Weight
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
In 1977, in the evaluation of the prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases, 11,880 persons in Eastern Finland were asked to report their own weight on a questionnaire. Each participant was weighted during the following clinical examination. The data of the self-reported body weight were analysed according to sex, age, measured weight and body-mass index (BMI). The results showed that older people underestimated their weight to a greater extent than did younger people of both sexes. The error between measured and self-reported weight was greater in heavier subjects than in thinner individuals. In both sexes weight estimate error (measured weight minus self-reported weight) correlated more strongly with high BMI than with measured weight. Associations between weight estimate error and other variables were studied using a multiple regression model. Men whose annual family income was low were more likely to underestimate their weight than the men with a high annual income. In general, women reported their weight more correctly than men did. Older women were more likely to report their weight less than younger women, whereas women who visited their doctor frequently or who had higher annual family incomes were more aware of their actual body weight than those who had few doctor's consultations or whose family income was low. In men 5.2% and in women 8.3% of the variation in the weight estimate error was explained by the regression model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3616534 View in PubMed
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[A comment: the core question for obese persons is quality of life. The Malmö study should not result in therapeutic nihilism].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197995
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 24;97(21):2648
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2000
Author
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Huddinge Universitetssjukhus. stephan.rossner@medhs.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 24;97(21):2648
Date
May-24-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic
Humans
Obesity - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Sweden
Weight Loss
PubMed ID
10881530 View in PubMed
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Adoption of the children's obesity clinic's treatment (TCOCT) protocol into another Danish pediatric obesity treatment clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269068
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2015;15:13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sebastian W Most
Birgitte Højgaard
Grete Teilmann
Jesper Andersen
Mette Valentiner
Michael Gamborg
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2015;15:13
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Protocols
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Parenting
Pediatric Obesity - psychology - therapy
Professional-Family Relations
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Social Class
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Treating severe childhood obesity has proven difficult with inconsistent treatment results. This study reports the results of the implementation of a childhood obesity chronic care treatment protocol.
Patients aged 5 to 18 years with a body mass index (BMI) above the 99th percentile for sex and age were eligible for inclusion. At baseline patients' height, weight, and tanner stages were measured, as well as parents' socioeconomic status (SES) and family structure. Parental weight and height were self-reported. An individualised treatment plan including numerous advices was developed in collaboration with the patient and the family. Patients' height and weight were measured at subsequent visits. There were no exclusion criteria.
Three-hundred-thirteen (141 boys) were seen in the clinic in the period of February 2010 to March 2013. At inclusion, the median age of patients was 11.1 years and the median BMI standard deviation score (SDS) was 3.24 in boys and 2.85 in girls. After 1 year of treatment, the mean BMI SDS difference was -0.30 (95% CI: -0.39; -0.21, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
25884714 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and substance abuse, depression and suicide attempts after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281902
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
O. Backman
D. Stockeld
F. Rasmussen
E. Näslund
R. Marsk
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastric Bypass - psychology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Small studies suggest that subjects who have undergone bariatric surgery are at increased risk of suicide, alcohol and substance use disorders. This population-based cohort study aimed to assess the incidence of treatment for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and attempted suicide after primary Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
All patients who underwent primary RYGB in Sweden between 2001 and 2010 were included. Incidence of hospital admission for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and suicide attempt was measured, along with the number of drugs prescribed. This cohort was compared with a large age-matched, non-obese reference cohort based on the Swedish population. Inpatient care and prescribed drugs registers were used.
Before RYGB surgery, women, but not men, were at higher risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use disorder compared with the reference cohort. After surgery, this was the case for both sexes. The risk of being diagnosed and treated for depression remained raised after surgery. Suicide attempts were significantly increased after RYGB. The adjusted hazard ratio for attempted suicide in the RYGB cohort after surgery compared with the general non-obese population was 2·85 (95 per cent c.i. 2·40 to 3·39).
Patients who have undergone RYGB are at an increased risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use, with an increased rate of attempted suicide compared with a non-obese general population cohort.
PubMed ID
27467694 View in PubMed
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Are youth BMI and physical activity associated with better or worse than expected health-related quality of life in adulthood? The Physical Activity Longitudinal Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146064
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Apr;19(3):339-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Katya M Herman
Wilma M Hopman
Cora L Craig
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology & Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada. 5ch3@queensu.ca
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Apr;19(3):339-49
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental health
Motor Activity
Obesity - psychology
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Abstract
Body mass index (BMI) and physical activity (PA) affect health-related quality of life (HRQL); however, the long-term impact of youth BMI and PA on adult HRQL is unknown. We investigated the relationship of youth BMI and PA to adult HRQL 22 years later.
Subjects included 310 participants aged 7 to 18 in the 1981 Canada Fitness Survey, followed up in 2002-2004. The associations of youth BMI and leisure time PA to adult HRQL were examined, comparing to age- and sex-adjusted Canadian SF-36 norms.
Bivariate analyses revealed positive associations between youth overweight and mental aspects of adult HRQL, but little association with physical aspects. In logistic regression adjusting for adult BMI and other covariates, overweight youth were 7 times more likely than healthy weight youth to score at/above the norm on both mental health (MH) and bodily pain, and almost 18 times more likely on the mental component score (MCS). Youth BMI was also positively associated with general health (GH), social functioning, and role emotional. Removing adult BMI from the models led to attenuated associations with mental HRQL and no association with GH. Longitudinal BMI status change was explored, and findings supported the main regression results. Youth PA was not associated with adult HRQL.
Youth overweight conveyed a long-term positive impact on several aspects of adult HRQL, and this impact may be both direct and indirect through BMI change and the effect on adult BMI. Youth PA had no long-term impact on adult HRQL.
PubMed ID
20077141 View in PubMed
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Aspects of well-being when struggling with obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307835
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec; 14(1):1699637
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Britt Marit Haga
Bodil Furnes
Elin Dysvik
Venke Ueland
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec; 14(1):1699637
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Obesity - psychology
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Stress, Psychological
Young Adult
Abstract
Purpose: We aimed to gain deeper insight into how people struggling with obesity handle their life situation by addressing how well-being might unfold. For many people, obesity becomes a lifelong condition characterized by repeated weight fluctuations while their weight increases gradually. From an existential perspective, constantly waiting for weight loss can cause an experience of not reaching one's full potential. How people with obesity experience well-being, within their perceived limitations, is less reflected in previous research.Methods: We established a qualitative study using in-depth interviews with seven men and 14 women with obesity (body mass index 335 kg/m2) aged 18-59 years. The study had an exploratory design including a phenomenological-hermeneutic perspective, with a lifeworld approach.Results: Three themes describing aspects of well-being were developed: coming to terms with the body, restoring the broken relational balance and reorienting the pivot in life. The thematic findings were abstracted into a main theme: striving to make living bearable. The movement towards well-being can be seen as a struggle towards an experience of balance to make bearable living.Conclusions: We suggest that well-being as a dialectic between vulnerability and freedom might become a health-facilitating experience for people struggling with obesity.
PubMed ID
31809658 View in PubMed
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Associates of obesity and weight dissatisfaction among Finnish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186700
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Feb;6(1):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Vera Mikkilä
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Pirjo Pietinen
Suvi M Virtanen
Matti Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. vera.mikkila@helsinki.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Feb;6(1):49-56
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Body Image
Body Weight
Education
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Obesity - psychology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We investigated behavioural and socio-economic factors associated with obesity and weight dissatisfaction among Finnish adolescents.
A total of 60,252 Finnish adolescents aged 14 to 16 years filled in a questionnaire about their health, health behaviour and socio-economic background. Food choices were obtained by using a short food-frequency questionnaire. Obesity was defined as a weight at least 120% of the sex- and height-specific mean weight for subjects.
Of girls and boys, 54% and 66%, respectively, were satisfied with their weight. Among dissatisfied normal-weight adolescents, 81% of girls but only 48% of boys thought they were overweight. Of obese boys, 25% were satisfied with their weight. For both genders, obesity and weight dissatisfaction were associated with economic problems in the family. In girls, an association was also found with poor school performance, low educational level of parents and not having evening meals at home; and in boys, with physical inactivity and not eating school lunch. Smoking was more common among girls who were dissatisfied with their weight. Differences in food choices were small between different weight and weight satisfaction categories.
Having normal weight and being satisfied with that weight are favourable for an adolescent. Obesity and weight dissatisfaction are associated mostly with disadvantageous health behaviours and low socio-economic status. Health behaviour seems to be associated more with weight satisfaction than with actual weight.
PubMed ID
12581465 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between perceived health care stigmatization and BMI change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260818
Source
Obes Facts. 2014;7(3):211-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lena M Hansson
Finn Rasmussen
Source
Obes Facts. 2014;7(3):211-20
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Body mass index
Body Weight
Female
Health Behavior
Health education
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Obesity, Morbid - psychology
Patient Compliance - psychology
Perception
Physician-Patient Relations
Stereotyping
Sweden
Abstract
This study examined the association between experiences of health care stigmatization and BMI changes in men and women with normal weight and obesity in Sweden.
The participants were drawn from a population-based survey in Sweden (1996-2006), and data on their perceived health care stigmatization were measured in 2008. They were categorized in individuals with normal weight (n = 1,064), moderate obesity (n = 1,273), and severe obesity (n = 291). The main outcome measure was change in BMI.
Individuals with severe obesity experiencing any health care stigmatization showed a BMI increase by 1.5 kg/m2 more than individuals with severe obesity with no such experience. For individuals with moderate obesity, insulting treatment by a physician and avoidance of health care were associated with a relative BMI increase of 0.40 and 0.75 kg/m2, respectively, compared with their counterparts who did not experience stigmatization in these areas. No difference in experience of any form of health care stigmatizing associated BMI change was observed for men and women with normal weight.
In this large, population-based study, perceived health care stigmatization was associated with an increased relative BMI in individuals with severe obesity. For moderate obesity, the evidence of an association was inconclusive.
PubMed ID
24903462 View in PubMed
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Associations between Parental Concerns about Preschoolers' Weight and Eating and Parental Feeding Practices: Results from Analyses of the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire, the Child Feeding Questionnaire, and the Lifestyle Behavior Checklist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274982
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(1):e0147257
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Anna Ek
Kimmo Sorjonen
Karin Eli
Louise Lindberg
Jonna Nyman
Claude Marcus
Paulina Nowicka
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(1):e0147257
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Eating - psychology
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Parents - psychology
Pediatric Obesity - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Insight into parents' perceptions of their children's eating behaviors is crucial for the development of successful childhood obesity programs. However, links between children's eating behaviors and parental feeding practices and concerns have yet to be established. This study aims to examine associations between parental perceptions of preschoolers' eating behaviors and parental feeding practices. First, it tests the original 8-factor structure of the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ). Second, it examines the associations with parental feeding practices, measured with the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ).
Questionnaires were sent to parents from 25 schools/preschools in Stockholm, Sweden and to parents starting a childhood obesity intervention. The CEBQ factor structure was tested with confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Associations between CEBQ subscales Food approach and Food avoidance and CFQ factors Restriction, Pressure to eat and Monitoring were examined with structural equation modelling (SEM), adjusting for child and parental characteristics, and parental confidence, measured with the Lifestyle Behavior Checklist (LBC). CFQ Concern for child weight and Perceived responsibility for child eating were used as mediators.
478 parents completed the questionnaires (children: 52% girls, mean age 5.5 years, 20% overweight/obese). A modified 8-factor structure showed an acceptable fit (TLI = 0.91, CFI = 0.92, RMSEA = 0.05 and SRMR = 0.06) after dropping one item and allowing three pairs of error terms to correlate. The SEM model demonstrated that Food approach had a weak direct effect on Restriction, but a moderate (? = 0.30) indirect effect via Concern, resulting in a substantial total effect (? = 0.37). Food avoidance had a strong positive effect on Pressure to eat (? = 0.71).
The CEBQ is a valid instrument for assessing parental perceptions of preschoolers' eating behaviors. Parental pressure to eat was strongly associated with children's food avoidance. Parental restriction, however, was more strongly associated with parents' concerns about their children's weights than with children's food approach. This suggests that childhood obesity interventions should address parents' perceptions of healthy weight alongside perceptions of healthy eating.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26799397 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes towards obesity in the Swedish general population: the role of one's own body size, weight satisfaction, and controllability beliefs about obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105993
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):43-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Lena M Hansson
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Public Health Epidemiology Group, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: lena.hansson@ki.se.
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):43-50
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Body Image - psychology
Body Size
Body Weight - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Social Class
Stereotyping
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined the associations of different socio-demographic and psychological factors with attitudes towards obesity. Individuals with different weight status (N=2436) were drawn from an annual population-based survey in Sweden, and data on attitudes towards obesity (ATOP) and predictor variables were assessed in 2008. The strongest predictor of ATOP was controllability beliefs about obesity (ß=0.83). Thus, greater controllability beliefs about obesity predicted more negative attitudes. Sex and weight satisfaction were also independently associated with ATOP. However, there was no, or only a weak, association between weight satisfaction and ATOP among individuals with normal weight or overweight. And the higher the weight satisfactions of individuals with obesity, the more positive were their attitudes. It seems that stigma-reduction strategies in the general public should address the uncontrollable factors in the aetiology of obesity. However, more research is needed to understand the underlying causes of people's attitudes towards obesity.
PubMed ID
24268600 View in PubMed
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