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Change of behaviour when selecting food products in a supermarket environment after reminding consumers about weight management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260166
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 May;17(5):1147-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Anna-Maria Saarela
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 May;17(5):1147-55
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Choice Behavior
Commerce
Diet
Female
Finland
Food Labeling
Food Preferences
Health promotion
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Interviews as Topic
Male
Memory
Middle Aged
Nutritive Value
Obesity - prevention & control
Observation
Abstract
The aim was to explore how the behaviour of consumers changed while they selected food in a supermarket environment after they were reminded about weight management. This investigation was carried out from the perspective of selection criteria, reading of package labels, nutritional quality of the products selected and time taken to select a product.
The subjects, who were actively watching their weight, participated in two consecutive tasks in a supermarket. They were given a shopping list of eleven food categories and asked to think aloud while selecting from each category a product they usually buy and a product they would use for weight management. The data (n 792 selections) were collected through interviews and a verbal analysis protocol combined with wireless audio-visual observation.
Thirty-six consumers were recruited from a sample of 367 supermarket customers.
Kuopio, Finland.
The subjects' behaviour changed radically after they were reminded about weight management. In the first selection, taste and familiarity were the main food selection criteria while in the latter selection the energy/fat content predominated. Consequently, the nutritional quality of products improved greatly because subjects read package labels twice as much in the latter selection. The time taken to select a product increased significantly, on average, from 23 (sd 10) to 60 (sd 51) s/product (P = 0·000).
Only by reminding consumers about weight management was there a significant impact on their food selection behaviour. Marketing communication should be developed which quickly and easily promotes consumers' awareness of healthy food in supermarkets.
PubMed ID
23442333 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Feb 12;178(4):386-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-2008
Author
Amanda Truscott
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Feb 12;178(4):386-7
Date
Feb-12-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Diabetes Mellitus - prevention & control
Food Preferences
Health Food - standards
Humans
Obesity - prevention & control
Preventive Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Societies, Medical
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2008 Apr 22;178(9):1186-718427098
Comment In: CMAJ. 2008 Apr 22;178(9):118818427104
Comment In: CMAJ. 2008 Apr 22;178(9):1187-818427101
Comment In: CMAJ. 2008 Apr 22;178(9):118718427103
PubMed ID
18202143 View in PubMed
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Children's perceptions of healthful eating and physical activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145046
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(1):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Jennifer Lisa Penner Protudjer
Gail Marchessault
Anita Luba Kozyrskyj
Allan Barry Becker
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(1):19-23
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet
Eating
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Health Food
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Style
Male
Manitoba
Motor Activity
Obesity - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Abstract
Healthful lifestyle habits established in childhood may continue through adulthood. Such habits may also be effective in preventing or reversing overweight and obesity. However, little is known about children's perceptions of healthful eating and physical activity. Thus, we sought a better understanding of how children perceive healthful eating and physical activity.
A purposeful selection was made of Winnipeg, Manitoba, boys (n=23) and girls (n=22) aged 11 to 12 years. The children were interviewed using a semi-structured, in-depth interview guide. Data were analyzed using thematic coding.
Although healthful eating was seen as necessary for health, high-fat, high-sugar foods were a source of pleasure and enjoyed during social times. Physical activity was a way of spending time with friends, either through active play or watching sports. Boys viewed screen time and homework as barriers to physical activity, while girls identified no common barriers. Children viewed physical activity as easier than healthful eating, describing the former as "play" and "fun."
Knowing how children think about food choices will further our understanding of the disconnect between nutrition knowledge and dietary behaviours. Understanding conflicting pressures that influence children's healthful lifestyles may enhance communication about these topics among parents, educators, and children.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010 Spring;71(1):421815308
PubMed ID
20205972 View in PubMed
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Differences in Danish children's diet quality on weekdays v. weekend days.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124085
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Sep;15(9):1653-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Berit W Rothausen
Jeppe Matthiessen
Camilla Hoppe
Per B Brockhoff
Lene F Andersen
Inge Tetens
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark. bewro@food.dtu.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Sep;15(9):1653-60
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages
Body mass index
Body Weight
Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Humans
Male
Meals
Motor Activity
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritive Value
Obesity - prevention & control
Overweight - prevention & control
Parents
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
To compare differences in children's diet quality on weekdays (Monday-Thursday), Fridays and weekend days.
A representative cross-sectional study in which participants completed a 7 d pre-coded food record. Mean intakes of energy, macronutrients and selected food items (g/10 MJ) as well as energy density were compared between weekdays, Fridays and weekend days for each gender in three age groups (4-6, 7-10 and 11-14 years) using Tobit analysis to account for zero intakes.
The Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity 2003-2008.
Children (n 784; 49·9 % boys) aged 4-14 years.
For both genders in all age groups (P
PubMed ID
22625874 View in PubMed
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Fat intake and food choices during weight reduction with diet, behavioural modification and a lipase inhibitor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61800
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 May;247(5):607-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
K. Franson
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Swedish Association for People with Bowel and Stomach Diseases, Box 20054, S-104 60 Stockholm, Sweden. stephan.rossner@medhs.ki.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 May;247(5):607-14
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Behavior Therapy
Diet Records
Diet, Reducing
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Double-Blind Method
Energy intake
Female
Food Preferences
Humans
Lactones - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - prevention & control
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the composition of fat intake and fat-rich meals consumed during a trial in which obese subjects were treated with a lipase-inhibitor or placebo, with emphasis on food choices and eating hours. DESIGN: Patients were instructed to record all food and drink taken for four days prior to each dietician visit. The food diaries from all scheduled 15 treatment visits were analysed for nutritional content and composition and for temporal distribution. All meals containing 25 g of fat were defined as fat-rich. SUBJECTS: Twenty-eight women and six men, mean age 45.2 +/- 10.9 (SD) years with a mean body mass index of 37.3 +/- 3.3 (SD) kg m-2 at the beginning of the study. RESULTS: Fat intake, both as absolute weight and as energy % was generally higher in the placebo group but no significant trend over time could be seen. Fat rich meals were increased by 59% towards the end of the study. Most fat rich meals were eaten at lunch and dinner. Cooking fat, fatty sauces, meat dishes and cheese contributed to the major proportion of fat, both for placebo and drug treated subjects. No major changes were seen in food choice over time. CONCLUSION: A lipase inhibitor may affect the amount of fat ingested but does not seem to change major sources of fat. The typical fat-rich meal consumed by these subjects was a meat dish, consumed in the evening.
PubMed ID
10810001 View in PubMed
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Food consumption patterns in preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123768
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(2):66-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Roman Pabayo
John C Spence
Linda Casey
Kate Storey
Author Affiliation
Sedentary Living Lab, Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(2):66-71
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Animals
Cereals
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Choice Behavior
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meat
Milk
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Obesity - prevention & control
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Healthy eating during early childhood is important for growth and development. Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide (CFG) provides dietary recommendations. We investigated patterns of food consumption among preschool children and attempted to determine whether these children's intakes met nutrition recommendations.
Between 2005 and 2007, four- and five-year-old children (n=2015) attending 12 Edmonton-region public health units for immunization were recruited for a longitudinal study on determinants of childhood obesity. The children's dietary intake at baseline was assessed using parental reports.
Overall, 29.6%, 23.5%, 90.9%, and 94.2% of the children met recommendations for vegetables and fruit, grain products, milk and alternatives, and meat and alternatives, respectively. In addition, 79.5% consumed at least one weekly serving of foods in the "choose least often" group. Significant differences existed in consumption of food groups across socioeconomic and demographic groups. For example, 82.9%, 84.7%, and 75.9% of preschool children from neighbourhoods of low, medium, and high socioeconomic status, respectively, consumed at least one food in the "choose least often" group (?² =16.2, p
PubMed ID
22668839 View in PubMed
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"If I drink it anyway, then I rather take the light one". Appropriation of foods and drinks designed for weight management among middle-aged and elderly Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117291
Source
Appetite. 2013 May;64:12-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Mari Niva
Mikko Jauho
Johanna Mäkelä
Author Affiliation
National Consumer Research Centre, PO Box 5 (Kaikukatu 3), FI-00531 Helsinki, Finland. mari.niva@ncrc.fi
Source
Appetite. 2013 May;64:12-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Body Weight
Diet
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Food Preferences
Humans
Judgment
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - prevention & control
Abstract
This article examines everyday ideals of eating for weight management as described by middle-aged and elderly Finns with varying experiences of managing their weight. The paper draws on the theoretical approach of appropriation and looks at the meanings, understandings and use of foods for weight management in the context of the practices of eating. The article is based on an analysis of eight focus group discussions with 68 people (47 women, 21 men, aged between 38 and 77) conducted in Helsinki in autumn 2009. The findings of the study suggest that lay understandings of foods suitable for weight management rest not only on simple measures such as energy, fat and sugar, but also on a complex set of generalised food ideals. These include a conflict between foods described as natural against artificial, moral judgements of the necessity of foods designed for weight management, and the overall emphasis on moderation as a basic ideal. The results indicate that people employ two perspectives in assessing foods suitable for weight management: in the context of the whole of diet the products are dismissed as unnecessary, but in specific situations they can replace 'normal' products if the latter are deemed more harmful.
PubMed ID
23313700 View in PubMed
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Interactive effects of reward sensitivity and residential fast-food restaurant exposure on fast-food consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145962
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;91(3):771-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Catherine Paquet
Mark Daniel
Bärbel Knäuper
Lise Gauvin
Yan Kestens
Laurette Dubé
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. catherine.paquet@unisa.edu.au
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;91(3):771-6
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cues
Diet
Fast Foods - adverse effects
Female
Food Preferences
Food Supply - standards
Health Behavior
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Motivation
Obesity - prevention & control
Odds Ratio
Restaurants
Reward
Abstract
Local fast-food environments have been increasingly linked to obesity and related outcomes. Individuals who are more sensitive to reward-related cues might be more responsive to such environments.
This study aimed to assess the moderating role of sensitivity to reward on the relation between residential fast-food restaurant exposure and fast-food consumption.
Four hundred fifteen individuals (49.6% men; mean age: 34.7 y) were sampled from 7 Montreal census tracts stratified by socioeconomic status and French/English language. The frequency of fast-food restaurant visits in the previous week was self-reported. Sensitivity to reward was self-reported by using the Behavioral Activation System (BAS) scale. Fast-food restaurant exposure within 500 m of the participants' residence was determined by using a Geographic Information System. Main and interactive effects of the BAS and fast-food restaurant exposure on fast-food consumption were tested with logistic regression models that accounted for clustering of observations and participants' age, sex, education, and household income.
Regression results showed a significant interaction between BAS and fast-food restaurant exposure (P
PubMed ID
20089726 View in PubMed
Less detail

The More and Less Study: a randomized controlled trial testing different approaches to treat obesity in preschoolers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270189
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:735
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anna Ek
Kathryn Lewis Chamberlain
Jan Ejderhamn
Philip A Fisher
Claude Marcus
Patricia Chamberlain
Paulina Nowicka
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:735
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body mass index
Chick Embryo
Child
Child, Preschool
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food Preferences
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Life Style
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
While obesity has been shown to be difficult to treat in school aged children and in adolescence, promising results have been detected for children who started treatment in early childhood. Yet knowledge on the effectiveness of structured early childhood obesity treatment programs is limited, preventing the widespread implementation of such programs. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of early treatment of childhood obesity with respect to treatment focus (parenting practices or lifestyle), length and intensity. The study will also examine the influence of gender, age, parental weight status, parenting practices, child behavior as well as parents' socioeconomic status and child and parental psychosocial health on children's weight status.
This is a parallel open label randomized controlled trial assessing two different behavioral treatment approaches offered in three conditions to families with children aged 4-6 years in Stockholm County, Sweden. Children (n = 180) identified as obese will be referred from primary child health care, school health care, and from outpatient pediatric clinics, and randomized to: 1) a standard treatment with focus on lifestyle, provided within the current healthcare system (n = 90); 2) a 10-session, 1.5 h/week group treatment with focus on parenting (n = 45); or 3) the same group treatment as 2) with additional follow-up sessions (n = 45). The primary study outcome is change in children's body mass index standard deviation score (BMI SDS) one year post-baseline. Secondary outcomes include changes in children's waist circumference, metabolic health, lifestyle patterns (Food Frequency Questionnaire), obesity-related child behaviors (Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire and Lifestyle Behavior Checklist, Problem Scale), parents' general and feeding parenting practices (Communicating with Children and Child Feeding Questionnaire) and lifestyle-specific self-efficacy (Lifestyle Behavior Checklist, Confidence Scale), family functioning (Family Assessment Device), child and parental psychosocial health (Child Behavior Checklist and Beck's Depression Inventory II).
This study will facilitate a close examination of key components of treatment for obesity during early childhood and mechanisms of change. Results from this study will lead to better healthcare options for obesity treatment during early childhood and ultimately to the prevention of obesity later in life.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01792531 Registered February 14, 2013.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26231850 View in PubMed
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Substituting sugar confectionery with fruit and healthy snacks at checkout - a win-win strategy for consumers and food stores? a study on consumer attitudes and sales effects of a healthy supermarket intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284141
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Nov 22;16(1):1184
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-2016
Author
Lise L Winkler
Ulla Christensen
Charlotte Glümer
Paul Bloch
Bent E Mikkelsen
Brian Wansink
Ulla Toft
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Nov 22;16(1):1184
Date
Nov-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Choice Behavior
Consumer Health Information
Denmark
Dietary Sucrose
Female
Focus Groups
Food Preferences
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Qualitative Research
Abstract
The widespread use of in-store marketing strategies to induce unhealthy impulsive purchases has implications for shopping experience, food choice and possibly adverse health outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine consumer attitudes and evaluate sales effects of a healthy checkout supermarket intervention. The study was part of Project Sundhed & Lokalsamfund (Project SoL); a Danish participatory community-based health promotion intervention.
Consumer attitudes towards unhealthy snack exposure in supermarkets were examined in a qualitative pre-intervention study (29 short in-store interviews, 11 semi-structured interviews and three focus group interviews). Findings were presented to food retailers and informed the decision to test a healthy checkout intervention. Sugar confectionery at one checkout counter was substituted with fruit and healthy snacking items in four stores for 4 weeks. The intervention was evaluated by 48 short exit interviews on consumer perceptions of the intervention and by linear mixed model analyses of supermarket sales data from the intervention area and a matched control area.
The qualitative pre-intervention study identified consumer concern and annoyance with placement and promotion of unhealthy snacks in local stores. Store managers were willing to respond to local consumer concern and a healthy checkout intervention was therefore implemented. Exit interviews found positive attitudes towards the intervention, while intervention awareness was modest. Most participants believed that the intervention could help other consumers make healthier choices, while fewer expected to be influenced by the intervention themselves. Statistical analyses suggested an intervention effect on sales of carrot snack packs when compared with sales before the intervention in Bornholm control stores (P?
Notes
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