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Achieving "proper" satiety in different social contexts--qualitative interpretations from a cross-disciplinary project, sociomaet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187281
Source
Appetite. 2002 Dec;39(3):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
S T Kristensen
L. Holm
A. Raben
A. Astrup
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Centre for Advanced Food Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, 30 Rolighedsvej, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. stk@kvl.dk
Source
Appetite. 2002 Dec;39(3):207-15
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appetite - physiology
Body mass index
Culture
Denmark
Female
Food Habits - physiology - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Obesity - prevention & control
Satiation
Satiety Response - physiology
Social Behavior
Abstract
In nutritional research, the sensations of appetite have mostly been studied as a physiological phenomenon. However, in order to understand the significance of appetite for everyday eating habits, it is pertinent to include the social dimension. In a qualitative interview study, using qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews, we investigated how appetite was experienced and handled in the context of everyday life among 20 men and women. This report examines how qualitative dimensions of appetite are experienced and conceptualised in everyday life. Achieving what was described as proper satiety was found to be of decisive importance for daily eating habits. The experience of being full up, the duration of satiety and the sensuous pleasure of eating were all found to be central dimensions of proper satiety, the definition of which varied according to different social contexts. Whether one ate one's fill in the company of others, alone, at work or in one's spare time turned out to be of decisive importance. A more elaborate understanding of the social dimensions of appetite may help to improve endeavours to prevent overweight and obesity.
PubMed ID
12495694 View in PubMed
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Active Smarter Kids (ASK): Rationale and design of a cluster-randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of daily physical activity on children's academic performance and risk factors for non-communicable diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269990
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:709
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Geir K Resaland
Vegard Fusche Moe
Eivind Aadland
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Øyvind Glosvik
John R Andersen
Olav M Kvalheim
Heather A McKay
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:709
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Child
Cluster analysis
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health Promotion - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Norway
Obesity - prevention & control
Physical Education and Training
Primary Prevention
Quality of Life
Risk factors
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Evidence is emerging from school-based studies that physical activity might favorably affect children's academic performance. However, there is a need for high-quality studies to support this. Therefore, the main objective of the Active Smarter Kids (ASK) study is to investigate the effect of daily physical activity on children's academic performance. Because of the complexity of the relation between physical activity and academic performance it is important to identify mediating and moderating variables such as cognitive function, fitness, adiposity, motor skills and quality of life (QoL). Further, there are global concerns regarding the high prevalence of lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The best means to address this challenge could be through primary prevention. Physical activity is known to play a key role in preventing a host of NCDs. Therefore, we investigated as a secondary objective the effect of the intervention on risk factors related to NCDs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of the ASK study, the ASK intervention as well as the scope and details of the methods we adopted to evaluate the effect of the ASK intervention on 5 (th) grade children.
The ASK study is a cluster randomized controlled trial that includes 1145 fifth graders (aged 10 years) from 57 schools (28 intervention schools; 29 control schools) in Sogn and Fjordane County, Norway. This represents 95.3 % of total possible recruitment. Children in all 57 participating schools took part in a curriculum-prescribed physical activity intervention (90 min/week of physical education (PE) and 45 min/week physical activity, in total; 135 min/week). In addition, children from intervention schools also participated in the ASK intervention model (165 min/week), i.e. a total of 300 min/week of physical activity/PE. The ASK study was implemented over 7 months, from November 2014 to June 2015. We assessed academic performance in reading, numeracy and English using Norwegian National tests delivered by The Norwegian Directorate for Education and Training. We assessed physical activity objectively at baseline, midpoint and at the end of the intervention. All other variables were measured at baseline and post-intervention. In addition, we used qualitative methodologies to obtain an in-depth understanding of children's embodied experiences and pedagogical processes taking place during the intervention.
If successful, ASK could provide strong evidence of a relation between physical activity and academic performance that could potentially inform the process of learning in elementary schools. Schools might also be identified as effective settings for large scale public health initiatives for the prevention of NCDs.
Clinicaltrials.gov ID nr: NCT02132494 . Date of registration, 6(th) of May, 2014.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26215478 View in PubMed
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Addressing the policy cacophony does not require more evidence: an argument for reframing obesity as caloric overconsumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118511
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:1042
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jacob J Shelley
Author Affiliation
Doctor of Juridical Science Candidate, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 84 Queen's Park, Toronto, ON M5S 2C5, Canada. jacob.shelley@mail.utoronto.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:1042
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Energy intake
Health Policy
Humans
Obesity - prevention & control
Policy Making
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
Numerous policies have been proposed to address the public health problem of obesity, resulting in a policy cacophony. The noise of so many policy options renders it difficult for policymakers to determine which policies warrant implementation. This has resulted in calls for more and better evidence to support obesity policy. However, it is not clear that evidence is the solution. This paper argues that to address the policy cacophony it is necessary to rethink the problem of obesity, and more specifically, how the problem of obesity is framed. This paper argues that the frame "obesity" be replaced by the frame "caloric overconsumption", concluding that the frame caloric overconsumption can overcome the obesity policy cacophony.
Frames are important because they influence public policy. Understood as packages that define issues, frames influence how best to approach a problem. Consequently, debates over public policy are considered battles over framing, with small shifts in how an issue is framed resulting in significant changes to the policy environment. This paper presents a rationale for reframing the problem of obesity as caloric overconsumption. The frame "obesity" contributes to the policy cacophony by including policies aimed at both energy output and energy input. However, research increasingly demonstrates that energy input is the primary cause of obesity, and that increases in energy input are largely attributable to the food environment. By focusing on policies that aim to prevent increases in energy input, the frame caloric overconsumption will reduce the noise of the obesity policy cacophony. While the proposed frame will face some challenges, particularly industry opposition, policies aimed at preventing caloric overconsumption have a clearer focus, and can be more politically palatable if caloric overconsumption is seen as an involuntary risk resulting from the food environment.
The paper concludes that policymakers will be able to make better sense of the obesity policy cacophony if the problem of obesity is reframed as caloric overconsumption. By focusing on a specific cause of obesity, energy input, the frame caloric overconsumption allows policymakers to focus on the most promising obesity prevention policies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23199375 View in PubMed
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Adopting and implementing nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities: public and private sector roles. A multiple case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124044
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:376
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dana Lee Olstad
Kim D Raine
Linda J McCargar
Author Affiliation
Alberta Institute for Human Nutrition, 4-126 Li Ka Shing Centre, 8606 112 St, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:376
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Food - standards
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Obesity - prevention & control
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Facilities
Qualitative Research
Recreation
Abstract
Recreational facilities are an important community resource for health promotion because they provide access to affordable physical activities. However, despite their health mandate, many have unhealthy food environments that may paradoxically increase the risk of childhood obesity. The Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth (ANGCY) are government-initiated, voluntary guidelines intended to facilitate children's access to healthy food and beverage choices in schools, childcare and recreational facilities, however few recreational facilities are using them.
We used mixed methods within an exploratory multiple case study to examine factors that influenced adoption and implementation of the ANGCY and the nature of the food environment within three cases: an adopter, a semi-adopter and a non-adopter of the ANGCY. Diffusion of Innovations theory provided the theoretical platform for the study. Qualitative data were generated through interviews, observations, and document reviews, and were analysed using directed content analysis. Set theoretic logic was used to identify factors that differentiated adopters from the non-adopter. Quantitative sales data were also collected, and the quality of the food environment was scored using four complementary tools.
The keys to adoption and implementation of nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities related to the managers' nutrition-related knowledge, beliefs and perceptions, as these shaped his decisions and actions. The manager, however, could not accomplish adoption and implementation alone. Intersectoral linkages with schools and formal, health promoting partnerships with industry were also important for adoption and implementation to occur. The food environment in facilities that had adopted the ANGCY did not appear to be superior to the food environment in facilities that had not adopted the ANGCY.
ANGCY uptake may continue to falter under the current voluntary approach, as the environmental supports for voluntary action are poor. Where ANGCY uptake does occur, changes to the food environment may be relatively minor. Stronger government measures may be needed to require recreational facilities to improve their food environments and to limit availability of unhealthy foods.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22632384 View in PubMed
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An integrative review of Canadian childhood obesity prevention programmes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165733
Source
Obes Rev. 2007 Jan;8(1):61-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
S. Conroy
R. Ellis
C. Murray
J. Chaw-Kant
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. sherrill.conroy@ualberta.ca
Source
Obes Rev. 2007 Jan;8(1):61-7
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Trials as Topic
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Male
Obesity - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Program Evaluation
Abstract
To examine successful Canadian nursing and health promotion intervention programmes for childhood obesity prevention during gestation and infancy, an integrative review was performed of the literature from 1980 to September 2005. The following databases were used: PubMed; Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; Cochrane Controlled Trials Register; Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects; ACP Journal Club; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; Scopus; Sociological Abstracts; Sport Discus; PsycInfo; ERIC and HealthStar. MeSH headings included: infancy (0-24 months), gestation, gestational diabetes, nutrition, prenatal care, pregnancy, health education, pregnancy outcome, dietary services with limits of Canadian, term birth. Of 2028 articles found, six Canadian childhood obesity prevention programmes implemented during gestation and/or infancy were found; three addressed gestational diabetes with five targeting low-income Canadian urban and/or Aboriginal populations. No intervention programmes specifically aimed to prevent childhood obesity during gestation or infancy. This paucity suggests that such a programme would be innovative and much needed in an effort to stem the alarming increase in obesity in children and adults. Any attempts either to develop new approaches or to replicate interventions used with obese adults or even older children need careful evaluation and pilot testing prior to sustained use within the perinatal period.
PubMed ID
17212796 View in PubMed
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[A scientific evaluation of the "alternative" food pyramid]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47077
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Feb 21;167(8):927-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-21-2005

Associations between infant feeding practice prior to six months and body mass index at six years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258868
Source
Nutrients. 2014 Apr;6(4):1608-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Cindy Mari Imai
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Birna Thorisdottir
Thorhallur Ingi Halldorsson
Inga Thorsdottir
Source
Nutrients. 2014 Apr;6(4):1608-17
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Breast Feeding
Child
Diet Records
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Iceland
Infant
Infant Formula
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Obesity - prevention & control
Overweight - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Weight Gain
Abstract
Rapid growth during infancy is associated with increased risk of overweight and obesity and differences in weight gain are at least partly explained by means of infant feeding. The aim was to assess the associations between infant feeding practice in early infancy and body mass index (BMI) at 6 years of age. Icelandic infants (n = 154) were prospectively followed from birth to 12 months and again at age 6 years. Birth weight and length were gathered from maternity wards, and healthcare centers provided the measurements made during infancy up to 18 months of age. Information on breastfeeding practices was documented 0-12 months and a 24-h dietary record was collected at 5 months. Changes in infant weight gain were calculated from birth to 18 months. Linear regression analyses were performed to examine associations between infant feeding practice at 5 months and body mass index (BMI) at 6 years. Infants who were formula-fed at 5 months of age grew faster, particularly between 2 and 6 months, compared to exclusively breastfed infants. At age 6 years, BMI was on average 1.1 kg/m2 (95% CI 0.2, 2.0) higher among infants who were formula fed and also receiving solid foods at 5 months of age compared to those exclusively breastfed. In a high-income country such as Iceland, early introduction of solid foods seems to further increase the risk of high childhood BMI among formula fed infants compared with exclusively breastfed infants, although further studies with greater power are needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24747694 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of Canadian oncology practitioners toward psychosocial interventions in clinical and research settings in women with breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207560
Source
Psychooncology. 1997 Sep;6(3):178-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
M E Del Giudice
M. Leszcz
K I Pritchard
L. Vincent
P. Goodwin
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Psychooncology. 1997 Sep;6(3):178-89
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Breast Neoplasms - psychology - secondary - therapy
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Clinical Trials as Topic - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Priorities
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Obesity - prevention & control - psychology
Oncology Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Palliative Care - psychology
Psychotherapy
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Self-Help Groups
Stress, Psychological - psychology - therapy
Therapeutics - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to survey Canadian oncology practitioners' attitudes toward psychosocial concerns and issues in women with breast cancer. Surveys were mailed to 351 medical, radiation and surgical oncologists and 375 oncology nurses. Standard questionnaires assessed attitudes towards psychosocial issues in women with primary and metastatic breast cancer and evaluated the practitioners' willingness to refer women to psychosocial intervention trials in the presence and absence of competing drug trials. Responses were obtained from 74% of those surveyed. Respondents reported being aware of the common occurrence of psychosocial problems in women with metastatic breast cancer, however, physicians were less likely than nurses to offer these women psychosocial support on a prophylactic basis (p
PubMed ID
9313283 View in PubMed
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Body dissatisfaction and dieting in 4,952 Norwegian children aged 11-15 years: less evidence for gender and age differences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30629
Source
Eat Weight Disord. 2003 Sep;8(3):238-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
R. Børresen
J H Rosenvinge
Author Affiliation
Fylkeshuset, Drammen, Norway.
Source
Eat Weight Disord. 2003 Sep;8(3):238-41
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age Factors
Body Image
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Diet, Reducing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Obesity - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Abstract
A number of studies have shown that dieting and body dissatisfaction are highly frequent among adolescents. We here describe the relationship between dieting and body dissatisfaction in 4,952 children selected from the 11, 13 and 15 year age cohorts of the Norwegian national sample in the multinational WHO survey "Health Behavior in School Children". Body dissatisfaction was defined as the subjective experience of being a bit or much too fat and, using this definition, about 20% of the boys reported body dissatisfaction and 7% that they were on a diet. About 37% of the girls reported body dissatisfaction and 15% that they were on a diet. Within the age cohorts, respectively 22%, 30% and 32% reported body dissatisfaction, whereas about 40% overall indicated no body dissatisfaction. Being on a diet was reported by 8% of the 11-year olds, and subsequently increased to 10% (13 years) and 14% (15 years). Multiple regression analysis showed that body dissatisfaction explained 33% of the variance in dieting behaviour, and that the overall effect of gender and age was small. Dieting and body dissatisfaction should therefore be recognised as being equally important among boys, and be counteracted within the framework of a health promotion strategy aimed at the general adolescent population.
PubMed ID
14649789 View in PubMed
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