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Age at puberty and the emerging obesity epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98488
Source
PLoS One. 2009;4(12):e8450
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Lise Aksglaede
Anders Juul
Lina W Olsen
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. lise.aksglaede@rh.regionh.dk
Source
PLoS One. 2009;4(12):e8450
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Aging - physiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Puberty - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recent studies have shown that puberty starts at younger ages than previously. It has been hypothesized that the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity is contributing to this trend. The purpose of this study was to analyze the association between prepubertal body mass index (BMI) and pubertal timing, as assessed by age at onset of pubertal growth spurt (OGS) and at peak height velocity (PHV), and the secular trend of pubertal timing given the prepubertal BMI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Annual measurements of height and weight were available in all children born from 1930 to 1969 who attended primary school in the Copenhagen municipality; 156,835 children fulfilled the criteria for determining age at OGS and PHV. The effect of prepubertal BMI at age seven on these markers of pubertal development within and between birth cohorts was analyzed. BMI at seven years was significantly inversely associated with age at OGS and PHV. Dividing the children into five levels of prepubertal BMI, we found a similar secular trend toward earlier maturation in all BMI groups. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The heavier both boys and girls were at age seven, the earlier they entered puberty. Irrespective of level of BMI at age seven, there was a downward trend in the age at attaining puberty in both boys and girls, which suggests that the obesity epidemic is not solely responsible for the trend.
PubMed ID
20041184 View in PubMed
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Associations between active travel and weight, blood pressure and diabetes in six middle income countries: a cross-sectional study in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271537
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2015;12:65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anthony A Laverty
Raffaele Palladino
John Tayu Lee
Christopher Millett
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2015;12:65
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bicycling - statistics & numerical data
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
China - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Ghana - epidemiology
Humans
India - epidemiology
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
South Africa - epidemiology
Transportation - methods
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
There is little published data on the potential health benefits of active travel in low and middle-income countries. This is despite increasing levels of adiposity being linked to increases in physical inactivity and non-communicable diseases. This study will examine: (1) socio-demographic correlates of using active travel (walking or cycling for transport) among older adults in six populous middle-income countries (2) whether use of active travel is associated with adiposity, systolic blood pressure and self-reported diabetes in these countries.
Data are from the WHO Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) of China, India, Mexico, Ghana, Russia and South Africa with a total sample size of 40,477. Correlates of active travel (=150 min/week) were examined using logistic regression. Logistic and linear regression analyses were used to examine health related outcomes according to three groups of active travel use per week.
46.4% of the sample undertook =150 min of active travel per week (range South Africa: 21.9% Ghana: 57.8%). In pooled analyses those in wealthier households were less likely to meet this level of active travel (Adjusted Risk Ratio (ARR) 0.77, 95% Confidence Intervals 0.67; 0.88 wealthiest fifth vs. poorest). Older people and women were also less likely to use active travel for =150 min per week (ARR 0.71, 0.62; 0.80 those aged 70+ years vs. 18-29 years old, ARR 0.82, 0.74; 0.91 women vs. men). In pooled fully adjusted analyses, high use of active travel was associated with lower risk of overweight (ARR 0.71, 0.59; 0.86), high waist-to-hip ratio (ARR 0.71, 0.61; 0.84) and lower BMI (-0.54 kg/m(2), -0.98;- 0.11). Moderate (31-209 min/week) and high use (=210 min/week) of active travel was associated with lower waist circumference (-1.52 cm (-2.40; -0.65) and -2.16 cm (3.07; -1.26)), and lower systolic blood pressure (-1.63 mm/Hg (-3.19; -0.06) and -2.33 mm/Hg (-3.98; -0.69)).
In middle-income countries use of active travel for =150 min per week is more common in lower socio-economic groups and appears to confer similar health benefits to those identified in high-income settings. Efforts to increase active travel levels should be integral to strategies to maintain healthy weight and reduce disease burden in these settings.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25986001 View in PubMed
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Effect of co-morbidity on the association of high body mass index with walking limitation among men and women aged 55 years and older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161661
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2007 Aug;19(4):277-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Sari Stenholm
Päivi Sainio
Taina Rantanen
Erkki Alanen
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Health and Functional Capacity, FI-20720 Turku, Finland. sari.stenholm@ktl.fi
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2007 Aug;19(4):277-83
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Smoking
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Obesity among older persons is rapidly increasing, thus affecting their mobility negatively. The aim of this study was to examine the association of high body mass index (BMI) with walking limitation, and the effect of obesity-related diseases on this association.
In a representative sample of the Finnish population of 55 years and older (2055 women and 1337 men), maximal walking speed, chronic diseases, and BMI were ascertained in a health examination. Walking limitation was defined as maximal walking speed of less than 1.2 m/s or difficulty in walking 500 meters. To analyze the effects of chronic conditions, smoking, marital status, and education on BMI class differences in walking limitation, covariates were sequentially adjusted in logistic regression analyses.
In women, an increasing gradient in the age-adjusted risk of walking limitation was observed with higher BMI: overweight (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.10-1.96), obese (OR 2.77, 95% CI 2.01-3.82), and severely obese (OR 5.80, 95% CI 3.52-9.54). In men, the risk was significantly increased among the obese (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.04-2.55) and severely obese (OR 4.33, 95% CI 2.20- 8.53). After adjustment of multiple covariates, the association remained significant among the obese (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.38-2.86) and severely obese women (OR 3.64, 95% CI 2.12-6.26), as well as severely obese men (OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.30-5.95). Knee osteoarthritis in women and diabetes in men contributed most to the excess risk of walking limitation among obese persons, 18 and 32% respectively.
Obesity increases the risk of walking limitation, independent of obesity-related diseases, smoking, marital status, and education, especially in older women. The results of this study emphasize the importance of maintaining normal body weight, in order to prevent obesity-related health risks and loss of functioning in older age.
PubMed ID
17726357 View in PubMed
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Impact on weight dynamics and general growth of the common FTO rs9939609: a longitudinal Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92707
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Sep;32(9):1388-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Jess T
Zimmermann E
Kring SII
Berentzen T
Holst C
Toubro S
Astrup A
Hansen T
Pedersen O
Sørensen TIA
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospitals, Centre for Health and Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. tj@ipm.regionh.dk
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Sep;32(9):1388-94
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Anthropometry - methods
Body Height - genetics
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Growth - genetics
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Proteins - genetics
Weight Gain - genetics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: We investigated the impact of the fatness-related FTO rs9939609 A-allele on cross-sectional and longitudinal measures of body mass index (BMI), height and lean body mass (LBM) in a unique cohort representing a broad range of BMI. SUBJECTS AND MEASUREMENTS: A random sample of all men attending the Danish draft boards during 1943-1977 plus all men with a BMI>or=31.0 kg/m(2) (assuring representation of the right end of the distribution) was taken. Anthropometric measures were available at up to eight points in time from birth to adulthood in 1629 genotyped men. The odds ratio (OR) for being a carrier of FTO rs9939609 according to (1) one unit alteration in z-scores for BMI, height and LBM at given ages and (2) longitudinal changes in BMI and height z-scores were assessed by logistic regression. RESULTS: Except at birth, the AA genotype was associated with increased BMI z-scores at all point during the monitored lifespan, starting at the age of 7 years. This effect remained stable until early adulthood, where further weight gain occurred. The AA genotype was also--mainly through the effect on fatness--associated with accelerated linear growth in childhood (age 7 years; OR, 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.74) and increased LBM in adulthood (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.14-1.35). CONCLUSION: Fatness induced by FTO rs9939609 in early childhood is sustained until early adulthood, where further weight gain may occur. FTO rs9939609 may, however, also be associated with linear growth and LBM mainly through the effect on fat mass.
PubMed ID
18663371 View in PubMed
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Physical activity improves the metabolic risk profiles in men and women: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50030
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1998 Aug 10-24;158(15):1633-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
I. Thune
I. Njølstad
M L Løchen
O H Førde
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1998 Aug 10-24;158(15):1633-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Exercise
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Because physical activity may affect risk of certain chronic diseases, we wanted to examine the effects of leisure time physical activity on the metabolic profiles. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study, 5220 men and 5869 women, aged 20 to 49 years at entry, took part in 2 surveys (1979-1980 and 1986-1987) with repeated assessments of self-reported leisure time activity. Measurements of body mass index (measured as the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters [BMI]) and levels of serum triglyceride, total cholesterol (total C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were studied in relation to 4 levels of physical activity. RESULTS: There was a dose-response relationship between serum lipid levels and BMI, and levels of physical activity in both sexes after adjustments for potential confounders. Differences in BMI and serum lipid levels between sedentary and sustained exercising groups were consistently more pronounced after 7 years than at baseline, especially in the oldest age group. Men reporting sustained very hard exercising compared with sedentary men had lower total C concentrations (5.65 mmol/L vs 6.21 mmol/L [218 mg/dL vs 240 mg/dL]), triglyceride levels (1.34 mmol/L vs 1.85 mmol/L [118 mg/dL vs 164 mg/dL] ), total C/HDL-C ratios by 19.0%, and BMI (23.9 kg/m2 vs 25.7 kg/m2), and higher HDL-C levels (1.52 mmol/L vs 1.36 mmol/L [59 mg/dL vs 52 mg/dL]). The combined sustained hard and very hard exercising group of women compared with sedentary women had lower total C concentrations (5.70 mmol/L vs 5.90 mmol/L [220 mg/ dL vs 228 mg/dL]), triglyceride levels (1.03 mmol/L vs 1.18 mmol/L [91 mg/dL vs 104 mg/dL]), total C/HDL-C ratios by 7.5%, BMI (23.1 kg/m2 vs 23.6 kg/m2), and higher HDL-C levels (1.73 mmol/L vs 1.66 mmol/L [67 mg/dL vs 64 mg/ dL]). An increase in leisure time activity over the 7 years improved metabolic profiles, whereas a decrease worsened them in both sexes. CONCLUSIONS: Sustained high levels and change from sedentary to higher levels of physical activity relative to sedentary men and women improved the metabolic risk profiles in both sexes. The differences observed are sufficiently large to have a beneficial effect in the prevention of certain chronic diseases.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Intern Med. 1999 Apr 26;159(8):882-310219938
Erratum In: Arch Intern Med 1998 Jan 11;159(1):17
PubMed ID
9701097 View in PubMed
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Pregnancy as a risk factor for obesity: lessons from the Stockholm Pregnancy and Weight Development Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64563
Source
Obes Res. 1995 Sep;3 Suppl 2:267s-275s
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
S. Rössner
A. Ohlin
Author Affiliation
Obesity Unit, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Obes Res. 1995 Sep;3 Suppl 2:267s-275s
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
Pregnancy and maternal body weight development are intertwined in complicated patterns. In most studies, an increase in maternal body weight with age and parity has been reported. For women who develop obesity, pregnancies can, in retrospect, be identified as important triggering life events. In a retrospective analysis of 128 women at our Obesity Unit, 73% of these severely obese patients had retained more than 10 kg in connection with a pregnancy. For the general population, the effect of a pregnancy on future weight development is surprisingly difficult to predict. In The Stockholm Pregnancy and Weight Development Study, the effects of pregnancy on weight retention one year after delivery were studied in 1423 women. Data were collected retrospectively from routine pregnancy records and then extended prospectively 6 and 12 months after delivery. The mean weight retention associated with a pregnancy one year after delivery was estimated to about 0.5 kg, with a range of -12 to +26 kg. Fourteen percent of the women gained more than 5 kg. Weight increase during pregnancy was the strongest predictor for sustained weight retention 1 year later. Prepregnancy weight did not predict the weight development outcome. The lactation pattern had only a minor influence on weight development. Smoking cessation was an important predictor for sustained weight increase. More weight retention was observed in those women who reported a change in lifestyle as regarded eating habits, meal patterns, and physical activity, suggesting that eventual body weight after pregnancy is more determined by the changes in association with that particular pregnancy than with the lifestyle before.
PubMed ID
8581786 View in PubMed
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The Relationship between Body Mass Index and 10-Year Trajectories of Physical Functioning in Middle-Aged and Older Russians: Prospective Results of the Russian HAPIEE Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285063
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2017;21(4):381-388
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Y. Hu
S. Malyutina
H. Pikhart
A. Peasey
M V Holmes
J. Hubacek
D. Denisova
Y. Nikitin
M. Bobak
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2017;21(4):381-388
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Data Collection
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the associations of overweight and obesity with longitudinal decline in physical functioning (PF) among middle-aged and older Russians.
Prospective cohort study.
Four rounds of data collection in the Russian Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe study with up to 10 years of follow-up.
9,222 men and women aged 45-69 years randomly selected from the population of two districts of Novosibirsk, Russia.
PF score (range 0-100) was measured by the Physical Functioning Subscale (PF-10) of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) at baseline and three subsequent occasions. Body mass index (BMI), derived from objectively measured body height and weight at baseline, was classified into normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9), obesity class I (BMI 30.0-34.9), and obesity class II+ (BMI=35.0).
The mean annual decline in the PF score during the follow-up was -1.92 (95% confidence interval -2.17; -1.68) in men and -1.91 (-2.13; -1.68) in women. At baseline, compared with normal weight, obesity classes I and II+ (but not overweight) were associated with significantly lower PF in both sexes. In prospective analyses, the decline in PF was faster in overweight men (difference from normal weight subjects -0.38 [-0.63; -0.14]), class I obese men and women (-0.49 [-0.82; -0.17] and -0.44 [-0.73; -0.15] respectively) and class II+ obese men and women (-1.13 [-1.73; -0.53] and -0.43 [-0.77; -0.09] respectively). Adjustment for physical activity and other covariates did not materially change the results.
PF decreased more rapidly in obese men and women than among those with normal weight. The adverse effect of high BMI on PF trajectories appeared to be more pronounced in men than in women, making more extremely obese Russian men an important target population to prevent/slow down the process of decline in PF.
PubMed ID
28346564 View in PubMed
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Secular trends in body mass index by birth cohort in eastern Finland from 1972 to 1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194635
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 May;25(5):727-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
M. Lahti-Koski
P. Jousilahti
P. Pietinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. Marjaana.Lahti-kski@ktl.fi
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 May;25(5):727-34
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aging - physiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
To describe changes in body mass index (BMI) with age over a 25 y period, and to investigate whether those changes differed by birth cohort, gender or education.
Six cross-sectional population surveys repeated in eastern Finland every fifth year between 1972 and 1997. Synthetic birth cohorts were created by dividing subjects into twelve 5 y groups according to birth year.
Independent random samples from the national population register including men and women aged 25-64 y, the final sample comprising 18 439 men and 19 501 women. The oldest birth cohort included subjects born in 1913-1917 and the youngest were born in 1968-1972.
Weight and height were measured, and data on educational level were collected by a self-administered questionnaire.
A BMI increase with age was more prominent in women (4.2 kg/m(2) in 25 y) than in men (3.3 kg/m(2) in 25 y), and was very similar in all birth cohorts. In men, the BMI increase with age varied across cohorts. Among birth cohorts participating in each survey, the BMI increase over the 25 y period was most prominent (3.9 kg/m(2) in 25 y) in men born between 1943 and 1947. Among all birth cohorts, the strongest upward trend (0.2 kg/m(2) per year) was observed in men born between 1953 and 1957.
Weight gain with age has remained unchanged in women over the 25 y period, whereas in men, the younger the birth cohort, the more prominent was the BMI increase with age.
PubMed ID
11360157 View in PubMed
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Tooth loss and periodontitis in older individuals: results from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119572
Source
J Periodontol. 2013 Aug;84(8):1134-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Stefan Renvert
Rigmor E Persson
G Rutger Persson
Author Affiliation
Oral Health Sciences, University of Kristianstad, Kristianstad, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2013 Aug;84(8):1134-44
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Furcation Defects - epidemiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
Due to the increasing number of older people, there is a need for studies focused on this population. The aims of the present study are to assess oral and systemic conditions in individuals aged 60 to 95 years with access to dental insurance.
Probing depths (PDs), tooth loss, alveolar bone levels, and systemic health were studied among a representative cohort of older individuals.
A total of 1,147 individuals in young-old (aged 60 or 67 years), old (aged 72 or 78 years), and old-old (aged =81 years) age groups were enrolled, including 200 individuals who were edentulous, in this study. Annual dental care was received by 82% of dentate individuals. Systemic diseases were common (diabetes: 5.8%; cardiovascular diseases: 20.7%; obesity: 71.2%; elevated C-reactive protein [CRP]: 98.4%). Serum CRP values were unrelated to periodontal conditions. Rates of periodontitis, defined as =30% of sites with a distance from cemento-enamel junction to bone of =5 mm, were 11.2% in women in the young-old age group and 44.9% in men in the old-old age group. Individuals in older age groups had a higher likelihood of periodontitis defined by bone loss and cutoff levels of PD =5 mm (odds ratio: 1.8; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 2.5; P
PubMed ID
23088532 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.