Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Factors related to adolescents' self-perceived health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181604
Source
Health Rep. 2003;14 Suppl:7-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Stéphane Tremblay
Susan Dahinten
Dafna Kohen
Author Affiliation
Health Analysis and Measurement Group, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 016. Tremblay@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2003;14 Suppl:7-16
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Adolescent Psychology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Self-Assessment
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This analysis examines self-perceived health among Canadian adolescents aged 12 to 17, and factors associated with ratings of very good/excellent health.
The data are from cycle 1.1 of the 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), conducted by Statistics Canada. The sample consisted of 12,715 adolescents aged 12 to 17.
Cross-tabulations were used to estimate the prevalence of various characteristics and health behaviours for the 12-to-14 and 15-to-17 age groups. Multiple logistic regression was used to model associations between very good/excellent self-reported health and selected characteristics.
In 2000/01, nearly 30% of 12- to 17-year-olds rated their health as poor, fair or good. At ages 15 to 17, girls were less likely than boys to report very good/excellent health and were more likely to have a chronic condition and to have experienced depression in the past year. When other factors were taken into account, the odds of reporting very good/excellent health were significantly lower for teens who were daily smokers, episodic heavy drinkers, physically inactive during leisure time, infrequent consumers of fruit and vegetables, or obese, compared with teens who did not have these characteristics.
PubMed ID
14768290 View in PubMed
Less detail

Increasing activity to reduce obesity in adolescent girls: a research review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177235
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;33(6):801-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Donna Clemmens
Laura L Hayman
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, 246 Greene Street, New York, NY 10003, USA. dc70@nyu.edu
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;33(6):801-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Adolescent Psychology
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To provide a systematic review of physical activity intervention research conducted with adolescent girls (12-19 years of age and/or in middle or high school) in the United States and Canada during the past two decades.
Published articles in English were identified in searches using MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycLIT, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, with the keywords adolescent health, obesity, physical activity, and exercise, between the dates of May 1980 and November 2003.
Research studies with interventions that started within the adolescent time period. Only 7 studies met the inclusion criteria.
The publication year, sample description, study design, interventions used, and outcomes were extracted from each study.
The 7 studies were published between 1989 and 2003, included girls and boys in the overall sample (no studies with girl-only samples), used randomized controlled trial or quasi-experimental designs, and included multicomponent interventions. Body mass index, fitness levels, exercise, and weight were measured as outcomes.
Although the results were not consistent across studies, they suggest that school-based, multicomponent interventions that were also designed to decrease sedentary behavior were effective in increasing physical activity in adolescent girls. Future research should focus on determinants of long-term adherence and the duration and intensity of interventions necessary to prevent obesity in adolescent girls.
PubMed ID
15561669 View in PubMed
Less detail

Meal pattern among Norwegian primary-school children and longitudinal associations between meal skipping and weight status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273088
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Feb;18(2):286-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Tonje H Stea
Frøydis N Vik
Elling Bere
Martin V Svendsen
Inger M Oellingrath
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Feb;18(2):286-91
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Body mass index
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meals
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Parents
Patient compliance
Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Schools
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To investigate meal pattern longitudinally and explore whether meal skipping was associated with overweight among Norwegian children and adolescents.
Longitudinal study. Children's meal frequencies were reported by their parents using a retrospective FFQ. Weight and height were measured by public health nurses. Descriptive data comparing 4th and 7th grade were analysed by paired-sample t tests for continuous variables and ? 2 tests for categorical variables. Odds ratio estimates, including confidence intervals, with BMI category (normal/overweight) as the dependent variable, were determined through logistic regression analyses.
Primary schools, Telemark County, Norway.
A cohort of 428 Norwegian boys and girls; 4th graders in 2007, 7th graders in 2010.
The number of children eating four main meals per day (regular meal frequency) decreased from 4th grade (47 %) to 7th grade (38 %; P = 0·001). Those who ate regular meals in 4th grade but not in 7th grade had higher odds (OR = 3·1; 95 % CI 1·1, 9·0) of being overweight in 7th grade after adjusting for gender, maternal education and physical activity, but the odds ratio was not statistically significant after adjusting for overweight in 4th grade (OR = 2·8; 95 % CI 0·7, 11·6).
The present study showed significant increases in overall meal skipping among children between 4th and 7th grade. The results indicate an association between overweight and meal skipping, but additional prospective and longitudinal analyses and intervention trials are warranted to confirm this relationship.
PubMed ID
24521714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nutritional status of indigenous children at boarding schools in northern Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181362
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Mar;58(3):532-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
J. Monárrez-Espino
H. Martínez
V. Martínez
T. Greiner
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Mar;58(3):532-40
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Anemia - epidemiology
Anthropometry
Child
Child Nutrition Disorders - blood - epidemiology
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Cross-Sectional Studies
Deficiency Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Iodine - blood - deficiency
Iron - blood - deficiency
Male
Mexico
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
To assess the nutritional status of Tarahumara children at indigenous boarding schools.
Cross-sectional comprehensive nutritional survey.
The schools sampled were located in indigenous municipalities of the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua.
The study was carried out in 2001 among 331 children aged 6-14 y from a sample of five schools. Anthropometric measurements, a thyroid exam and capillary haemoglobin levels were obtained from the children. Serum concentrations of ferritin, iron, total iron-binding capacity, vitamin B(12), folic acid and zinc were collected from a subsample of 100 children.
The prevalence of wasting and overweight (children 6-9 y) was 1.1 and 4.6%, respectively, and of underweight, risk of overweight and overweight (10-14 y) was 3.2, 5.1 and 0.6%, respectively. Stunting (6-12 y) was present in 22.3% of the children. The total goitre rate was 5.4%. The prevalence of anaemia was 13% (boys 11.4, girls 14.5%). Overall, 24.2% of the children were iron deficient (depletion 11.1%, deficient erythropoiesis 3%, iron deficiency anaemia 10.1%). No child had folic acid values
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Oct;59(10):1213-616015267
PubMed ID
14985693 View in PubMed
Less detail