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1422 records – page 1 of 143.

ß2-adrenergic receptor Thr164Ile polymorphism, obesity, and diabetes: comparison with FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18 polymorphisms in more than 64,000 individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125626
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jun;97(6):E1074-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Mette Thomsen
Morten Dahl
Anne Tybjærg-Hansen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jun;97(6):E1074-9
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Proteins - genetics
Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4 - genetics
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
The ß(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) influences regulation of energy balance by stimulating catecholamine-induced lipolysis in adipose tissue. The rare functional ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) polymorphism could therefore influence risk of obesity and subsequently diabetes.
We tested the hypothesis that the ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) polymorphism associates with risk of obesity and diabetes and compared effect sizes with those of FTO(rs9939609), MC4R(rs17782313), and TMEM18(rs6548238).
We conducted a population-based cohort study in Copenhagen, Denmark.
We genotyped more than 64,000 individuals from the Danish general population.
We evaluated body mass index (BMI), obesity (BMI =30 kg/m(2)), and diabetes.
Rare allele frequencies were 0.02 for T for ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile), 0.40 for A for FTOrs9939609, 0.25 for C for MC4Rrs17782313, and 0.20 for T for TMEM18rs6548238. For rare vs. common homozygotes, odds ratio for obesity was 3.32 (95% confidence interval = 1.08-10.19) for ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile), 1.42 (1.35-1.52) for FTOrs9939609, 1.18 (1.06-1.30) for MC4Rrs17782313, and 1.28 (1.10-1.50) for TMEM18rs6548238 (common vs. rare). Corresponding odds ratios for diabetes were 1.85 (0.24-14.29), 1.22 (1.07-1.39), 0.96 (0.80-1.16), and 1.61 (1.17-2.22), respectively. After adjustment for BMI, only TMEM18rs6548238 remained associated with diabetes. BMI was increased in rare vs. common homozygotes in FTOrs9939609, MC4Rrs17782313, and TMEM18rs6548238 (common vs. rare) but not in ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile).
Our results suggest that ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) rare vs. common homozygotes are not significantly associated with an increase in BMI measured continuously but may be associated with an increased risk of obesity. Also, TMEM18rs6548238 associated with risk of diabetes after adjustment for BMI. These findings need confirmation in other studies.
PubMed ID
22466342 View in PubMed
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A 4-year, cluster-randomized, controlled childhood obesity prevention study: STOPP.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99038
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
C. Marcus
G. Nyberg
A. Nordenfelt
M. Karpmyr
J. Kowalski
U. Ekelund
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, National Childhood Obesity Centre, Stockholm, Sweden. claude.marcus@ki.se
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Child
Cluster analysis
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Physical Fitness - psychology
Prevalence
Risk Reduction Behavior
School Health Services
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of a school-based intervention programme to reduce the prevalence of overweight in 6 to 10-year-old children. DESIGN: Cluster-randomized, controlled study. SUBJECTS: A total of 3135 boys and girls in grades 1-4 were included in the study. METHODS: Ten schools were selected in Stockholm county area and randomized to intervention (n=5) and control (n=5) schools. Low-fat dairy products and whole-grain bread were promoted and all sweets and sweetened drinks were eliminated in intervention schools. Physical activity (PA) was aimed to increase by 30 min day(-1) during school time and sedentary behaviour restricted during after school care time. PA was measured by accelerometry. Eating habits at home were assessed by parental report. Eating disorders were evaluated by self-report. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight and obesity decreased by 3.2% (from 20.3 to 17.1) in intervention schools compared with an increase of 2.8% (from 16.1 to 18.9) in control schools (P
PubMed ID
19290010 View in PubMed
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A 12 year prospective study of circulatory disease among Danish shift workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82071
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Tüchsen F.
Hannerz H.
Burr H.
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. ft@ami.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies of the risk of heart disease after shift work reached different estimates and review authors disagree about the validity of some of the studies. A cross sectional study showed that shift workers had a higher prevalence of nearly every unfavourable work environment factor investigated. Conflicts at work and low decision latitude were more frequent among shift workers, and all-day walking or standing work and part-time jobs were more often found among female shift workers. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risk of circulatory disease in a prospective follow up of a representative sample of gainfully employed Danes, considering known or suspected confounding factors. METHODS: A cohort of 5517 people who were gainfully employed in 1990 were followed up for all hospital treatments due to circulatory diseases (390-458, ICD-8; I00-I99, ICD-10) from 1991 to 2002 inclusive. A log linear Poisson regression model was applied to control confounding factors and calculate the relative risk for 927 men and women working nights, evenings, or other non-day shifts compared to 4579 day workers. RESULTS: Non-day workers compared to day workers had a relative risk (RR) for all circulatory diseases of 1.31 (95% CI 1.06-1.63). Without control for BMI and smoking, the RR estimate was 1.33 (95% CI 1.07-1.65). For a subgroup of workers with at least three years' seniority, the RR was 1.40 (95% CI 1.09-1.81). The population based aetiological fraction of shift work was estimated to 5%. CONCLUSION: This study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that shift work carries an excess risk of circulatory diseases.
PubMed ID
16735480 View in PubMed
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A 24-year follow-up of body mass index and cerebral atrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9325
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2004
Author
D. Gustafson
L. Lissner
C. Bengtsson
C. Björkelund
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. deb.gustafson@neuro.gu.se
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Date
Nov-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Atrophy
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cerebral Cortex - pathology - radiography
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the longitudinal relationship between body mass index (BMI), a major vascular risk factor, and cerebral atrophy, a marker of neurodegeneration, in a population-based sample of middle-aged women. METHODS: A representative sample of 290 women born in 1908, 1914, 1918, and 1922 was examined in 1968 to 1969, 1974 to 1975, 1980 to 1981, and 1992 to 1993 as part of the Population Study of Women in Göteborg, Sweden. At each examination, women completed a survey on a variety of health and lifestyle factors and underwent anthropometric, clinical, and neuropsychiatric assessments and blood collection. Atrophy of the temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes was measured on CT in 1992 when participants were age 70 to 84. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between BMI and brain measures. RESULTS: Women with atrophy of the temporal lobe were, on average, 1.1 to 1.5 kg/m2 higher in BMI at all examinations than women without temporal atrophy (p
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2005 Jun 14;64(11):1990-1; author reply 1990-115955971
SummaryForPatientsIn: Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):E19-2015557485
PubMed ID
15557505 View in PubMed
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Abdominal adipose tissue distribution, obesity, and risk of cardiovascular disease and death: 13 year follow up of participants in the study of men born in 1913.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55732
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 May 12;288(6428):1401-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-12-1984
Author
B. Larsson
K. Svärdsudd
L. Welin
L. Wilhelmsen
P. Björntorp
G. Tibblin
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 May 12;288(6428):1401-4
Date
May-12-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adipose Tissue
Aged
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Body Composition
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Obesity - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
In a prospective study of risk factors for ischaemic heart disease 792 54 year old men selected by year of birth (1913) and residence in Gothenburg agreed to attend for questioning and a battery of anthropometric and other measurements in 1967. Thirteen years later these baseline findings were reviewed in relation to the numbers of men who had subsequently suffered a stroke, ischaemic heart disease, or death from all causes. Neither quintiles nor deciles of initial indices of obesity (body mass index, sum of three skinfold thickness measurements, waist or hip circumference) showed a significant correlation with any of the three end points studied. Statistically significant associations were, however, found between the waist to hip circumference ratio and the occurrence of stroke (p = 0.002) and ischaemic heart disease (p = 0.04). When the confounding effect of body mass index or the sum of three skinfold thicknesses was accounted for the waist to hip circumference ratio was significantly associated with all three end points. This ratio, however, was not an independent long term predictor of these end points when smoking, systolic blood pressure, and serum cholesterol concentration were taken into account. These results indicate that in middle aged men the distribution of fat deposits may be a better predictor of cardiovascular disease and death than the degree of adiposity.
PubMed ID
6426576 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of maternal reports of pre-schoolers' weights and heights as estimates of BMI values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163500
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Feb;36(1):132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Lise Dubois
Manon Girad
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Institute at Population Health, 1 Stewart Street, Office 303, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. lise.dubois@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Feb;36(1):132-8
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers - psychology
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight
Population Surveillance - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Rural Health
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban health
Abstract
Data is lacking on the reliability of weight and height for young children as reported by parents participating in population-based studies. We analysed the accuracy of parental reports of children's weights and heights as estimates of body mass index, and evaluated the factors associated with the misclassification of overweight and obese children.
Analyses were conducted on a population-based birth cohort of 1549 4-year-old children from the province of Québec (Canada) in 2002. Mothers reported weights and heights for the children as part of the regular annual data collection. Within the following 3 months, children's weights and heights were measured at home as part of a nutrition survey.
This study indicates that mothers overestimate their children's weight more than their height, resulting in an overestimation of overweight children of more than 3% in the studied population. Only 58% of the children were reported as overweight/obese with reported values. Maternal misreporting is more important for boys than girls, and for low socioeconomic status children compared with high socioeconomic status children.
Research on the prevalence of overweight and obesity has often used self-reported measures of height and weight to estimate BMI. However, the results emphasize the importance of collecting measured data in childhood studies of overweight and obesity at the population level.
PubMed ID
17510077 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of self-reported weights.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74374
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1981 Aug;34(8):1593-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1981
Author
A J Stunkard
J M Albaum
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1981 Aug;34(8):1593-9
Date
Aug-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Weight
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
United States
Abstract
The accuracy of self-reported weights was assessed by comparing reported weights with measured weights of 1302 subjects at eight different medical and nonmedical sites across two countries (United States and Denmark), across ages, sexes, and different purposes for the weight measurements. Self-reported weights were remarkably accurate across all these variables in the American sample, even among obese people, and may obviate the need for measured weights in epidemiological investigations. Danish reports were somewhat less accurate, particularly among women over 40 yr of age.
PubMed ID
7270483 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of the Broselow tape in estimating the weight of First Nations children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130926
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2011;16(4):121-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Stephanie Bourdeau
Julie Copeland
W Ken Milne
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2011;16(4):121-5
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Infant
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Ontario - epidemiology - ethnology
Pediatrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
During resuscitation, the Broselow tape (BT) is the standard method of estimating pediatric weight based on body length. The First Nations population has a higher prevalence of obesity and experiences more injury than the non-First Nations population. The prevalence of obesity has raised the concern that the BT may not accurately estimate weight in this population. The purpose of this study was to validate the BT in 8 First Nations communities.
We performed a search of the electronic medical records of 2 community health centres that serve 8 local First Nations communities. We searched for the most recent clinic visit during which height and weight had been recorded in the records of patients less than 10 years of age with a postal code indicating residence in a First Nations community. The patients' actual weight was compared with their BT weight estimates using the Bland-Altman method. The Spearman coefficient of rank and percentage error was also calculated.
A total of 243 children were included in the study (119 girls, 124 boys). The mean age was 33.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 29.7 to 36.9), mean height was 91.8 cm (95% CI 89.0 to 94.6), mean weight was 16.2 kg (95% CI 15.0 to 17.3)and mean BT weight was 14.0 kg (95% CI 13.1 to 14.8). The Bland-Altman percent difference was 11.9% (95% CI -17.3% to 41.1%). The Spearman coefficient of rank correlation was 0.963 (p
PubMed ID
21955338 View in PubMed
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Acquired preference especially for dietary fat and obesity: a study of weight-discordant monozygotic twin pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189641
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Jul;26(7):973-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
A. Rissanen
P. Hakala
L. Lissner
C-E Mattlar
M. Koskenvuo
T. Rönnemaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Jul;26(7):973-7
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
To determine the independent associations of dietary preference for fat with obesity without the confounding by genetic effects.
Descriptive comparison of the responses of monozygotic twins discordant for obesity to questions concerning current and past preference for dietary fat, current overconsumption of fatty items and recalled food consumption compared to the co-twin.
The Research and Development Centre of the Social Insurance Institution, Finland.
Twenty-three healthy monozygotic twin pairs who were discordant for obesity (BMI difference at least 3 kg/m(2)).
Obesity status of the twin, as a function of the current and recalled dietary preferences and selected psychosocial variables.
The obese twins reported current preference for fatty foods three times more frequently than the lean co-twin. Moreover, when comparing recalled taste for fat at the time the twins left their parental homes, both the obese and lean co-twins consistently recalled that the obese twin had greater preference for fatty foods in young adulthood, and that the lean twin had less. Psychological characteristics of lean and obese co-twins did not differ.
Acquired preference for fatty foods is associated with obesity, independent of genetic background. Modification of fat preferences may be an important step in the prevention of obesity in the general population.
PubMed ID
12080452 View in PubMed
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Action levels for obesity treatment in 40 to 42-y-old men and women compared with action levels for prevention of coronary heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47627
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Nov;25(11):1698-704
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
S. Tonstad
S. Graff-Iversen
Author Affiliation
Preventive Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Ullevål Hospital, Oslo, Norway. sesrena.tonstad@ulleval.no
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Nov;25(11):1698-704
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adult
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Practice Guidelines
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Guidelines for treating overweight and obesity have been suggested by the World Health Organization and other expert groups. We asked whether most men and women targeted in obesity guidelines would already be included in existing clinical recommendations for the prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) or whether a new group of patients would be added to current workloads. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In 1997 the Norwegian National Health Screening Service examined CHD risk factors in subjects aged 40-42 y living in three counties. We studied 6911 men and 7992 women who did not report treatment for diabetes, hypertension or the presence of cardiovascular disease. Estimated 10 y risk of CHD was calculated using the Framingham equation. RESULTS: The prevalence of single risk factors (systolic blood pressure > or =160 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure > or =95 mmHg, total cholesterol level > or =7.8 mmol/l and nonfasting glucose > or =11.1 mmol/l) ranged between 0 and 11% among subjects with body mass index > or =25 kg/m2. Adding low HDL cholesterol ( or =10%). Sensitivities and specificities of using body mass index (BMI) or BMI and waist circumference as a screen for elevated CHD risk ranged between 22 and 91%. Screening for 10 y CHD risk of > or =10% or one or more risk factors among men and screening for one or more risk factors among women gave positive predictive values of 19-50%; however, the positive predictive value of screening for 10 y CHD risk of > or =10% was only 1-2% among women. Compared with men with BMI
PubMed ID
11753593 View in PubMed
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1422 records – page 1 of 143.