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Associations between body mass index and development of metabolic disorders in fertile women--a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258281
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014;3(2):e000672
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Michelle Dalgas Schmiegelow
Charlotte Andersson
Lars Køber
Søren Skøtt Andersen
Mette Lykke Norgaard
Thomas Bo Jensen
Gunnar Gislason
Siv Mari Berger
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Gentofte University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014;3(2):e000672
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dyslipidemias - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Fertility
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Metabolic disorders are relatively uncommon in young women, but may increase with obesity. The associations between body mass index (BMI) and risks of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in apparently healthy, young women have been insufficiently investigated, and are the aims of this study.
Women giving birth during the years 2004-2009, with no history of cardiovascular disease, renal insufficiency, pregnancy-associated metabolic disorders, diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia were identified in nationwide registers. Women were categorized as underweight (BMI
Notes
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Cites: JAMA. 2002 Oct 9;288(14):1728-3212365956
PubMed ID
24721798 View in PubMed
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Associations of obesity with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviors in a nationally representative sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151933
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2009 Apr;66(4):277-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Amber A Mather
Brian J Cox
Murray W Enns
Jitender Sareen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2009 Apr;66(4):277-85
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine whether obesity is associated with a variety of psychiatric outcomes after taking into account physical health conditions.
Data came from the public use dataset of the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.2 (age 15 years and older, N=36,984). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition psychiatric diagnoses of major depressive disorder, mania, panic attacks, panic disorder, social phobia, agoraphobia, alcohol dependence, and drug dependence were examined, as was suicidal behavior (ideation or attempts). Multiple logistic regression was utilized to examine the association between obesity (defined as body mass index >or=30) and mental health outcomes. Covariates in the regressions included sociodemographic factors and a measure of physical illness burden (the Charlson Comorbidity Index).
In adjusted models, obesity was positively related to several lifetime psychiatric disorders (depression, mania, panic attacks, social phobia, agoraphobia without panic disorder), any lifetime mood or anxiety disorder, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) range: 1.22-1.58]. Obesity was similarly positively associated with past-year depression, mania, panic attacks, social phobia, any anxiety disorder, and suicidal ideation (AOR range: 1.24-1.52), and negatively associated with past-year drug dependence (AOR=0.53, 95% CI 0.31-0.89). Most of these associations were found to be specific to women, while some were also present in men.
Independent of physical health conditions, obesity was associated with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior in the Canadian population. Possible mechanisms and clinical implications of these findings are considered.
PubMed ID
19302884 View in PubMed
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Body Composition During Pregnancy: Longitudinal Changes and Method Comparisons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307140
Source
Reprod Sci. 2020 07; 27(7):1477-1489
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2020
Author
Marja Bosaeus
Ulrika Andersson-Hall
Louise Andersson
Therese Karlsson
Lars Ellegård
Agneta Holmäng
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 432, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Reprod Sci. 2020 07; 27(7):1477-1489
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adipose Tissue - physiology
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electric Impedance
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status - physiology
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The Pregnancy Obesity Nutrition and Child Health study is a longitudinal study of reproductive health. Here we analyzed body composition of normal-weight and obese Swedish women by three methods during each trimester of pregnancy. Cross-sectional and longitudinal fat mass estimates using quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) (Tanita MC-180MA-III) were compared with fat mass determined by air displacement plethysmography (ADP) in pregnancy weeks 8-12, 24-26, and 35-37 in normal-weight women (n =?122, BMI?=?22.1?±?1.6 kg/m2) and obese women (n =?29, BMI?=?34.6?±?3.6 kg/m2). ADP results were calculated from pregnancy-adjusted fat-free mass densities. Mean fat mass by QMR and ADP were similar in obese women, although with wide limits of agreement. In normal-weight women, QMR overestimated mean fat mass in all trimesters, with systematic overestimation at low fat mass values in trimesters 1 and 3. In obese women, fat mass by BIA was grossly underestimated and imprecise in all trimesters, especially at higher values in trimester 2. In normal-weight women, fat mass by BIA was moderately lower than by ADP in trimester 1, similar in trimester 2, and moderately higher in trimester 3. QMR and ADP assessed fat mass changes similarly in obese women, whereas BIA overestimated fat mass changes in normal-weight women. Mean fat mass and fat mass changes by QMR and pregnancy-adjusted ADP were similar in pregnant obese women. Mean fat mass by QMR and fat mass changes by BIA were higher than corresponding values determined by pregnancy-adjusted ADP in normal-weight women.
PubMed ID
31993997 View in PubMed
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[Dietary intake of young Icelanders with psychotic disorders and weight development over an 8-12 months period].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285635
Source
Laeknabladid. 2017 Juni;103(6):281-286
Publication Type
Article
Author
Helga Gudrun Fridthjofsdottir
Olof Gudny Geirsdottir
Halldora Jonsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Holmfridur Thorgeirsdottir
Nanna Briem
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Source
Laeknabladid. 2017 Juni;103(6):281-286
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Records
Feeding Behavior
Female
Healthy Diet
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Nutritional Status
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Recommended dietary allowances
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Time Factors
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
The prevalence of lifestyle related diseases is higher among people with psychotic disorders than the general population. The aim was to assess dietary intake of young people with psychotic disorders for the first time in Iceland.
Subjects were young people (n=48, age 18-30y) with psychotic disorders. Dietary intake was assessed by a 24-hour recall in July-August 2016, and compared with official recommendations and intake of the general public (n=250, age 18-30y). Body weight in the past eight to 12 months, was retrieved from medical records.
Consumption of fruits, fish, dairy products, vegetable and fish oil was significantly lower among subjects when compared with the general public, while their soft drink and sweets consumption was higher (p5% of their initial body weight in the past 8-2 months.
Diet of young people with psychotic disorders is not consistent with recommendations and is worse than the diet of their peers in the general population. It is important to find ways to improve the diet and thereby nutrient intake of the group. Key words: psychotic disorders, schizophrenia, recommended dietary allowances, fatty acids, omega-3, vitamin D. Correspondence: Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir, ingigun@landspitali.is.
PubMed ID
28665288 View in PubMed
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Does fitness improve the cardiovascular risk profile in obese subjects?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285339
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2017 Jun;27(6):518-524
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
H. Halland
M T Lønnebakken
S. Saeed
H. Midtbø
D. Cramariuc
E. Gerdts
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2017 Jun;27(6):518-524
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Exercise Test
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - prevention & control
Time Factors
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Good cardiorespiratory fitness has been suggested to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in obesity. We explored the association of fitness with the prevalences of major cardiovascular risk factor like hypertension (HT), diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in overweight and obese subjects.
Clinical data from 491 participants in the FAT associated CardiOvasculaR dysfunction (FATCOR) study were analyzed. Physical fitness was assessed by ergospirometry, and subjects with at least good level of performance for age and sex were classified as fit. HT subtypes were identified from clinic and 24-h?ambulatory blood pressure in combination. Diabetes was diagnosed by oral glucose tolerance test. MetS was defined by the American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute criteria. The participants were on average 48 years old (60% women), and mean body mass index (BMI) was 32?kg/m(2). 28% of study participants were classified as fit. Fitness was not associated with lower prevalences of HT or HT subtypes, diabetes, MetS or individual MetS components (all p?>?0.05). In multivariable regression analysis, being fit was characterized by lower waist circumference, BMI?
PubMed ID
28528703 View in PubMed
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[Effects of rehabilitation on functional capacity, obesity and health behavior, among cardiac patients with DM2].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269380
Source
Laeknabladid. 2015 Sep;101(9):405-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Karl Kristjánsson
Magnús R Jónasson
Sólrún Jónsdóttir
Hjalti Kristjánsson
Marta Guðjónsdóttir
Source
Laeknabladid. 2015 Sep;101(9):405-10
Date
Sep-2015
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Diet - adverse effects
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Abstract
Present study examines the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (DM2) in patients attending cardiac rehabilitation (CR) compared to the general population utilising data from the Icelandic Heart Association population study. The study also examined the efficacy of CR for promoting health behaviors.
A prospective study among DM2 patients attending CR at Reykjalundur Rehabilitation centre. The DM2 group was compared to other cardiac patients, with respect to obesity and exercise capacity at the beginning and end of 4-6 weeks of CR. Additionally, in the DM2 group, weight, smoking cessation, physical activity and walking capacity were assessed at 3 and 6 months follow-ups.
The prevalence of DM2 was 2-4 times higher in CR participants than in the general population. Compared to other CR participants, the DM2 group was heavier, with increased waist circumference and less exercise capacity. During the CR both groups lost weight and waist circumference decreased to similar extent, but the exercise capacity increased less in the DM2 group. In follow up after 6 months the DM2 group´s weight and glucose values were back to same level as before CR, but waist circumference was still decreased and they retained increased physical activity and walking capacity.
DM2 is more prevalent among patients in cardiac rehabilitation than in the general population. The DM2 group was more obese, had lower exercise capacity and responded somewhat less to CR than other cardiac patients. Follow up after 6 months did however show that they continued their regular exercise and walking capacity was still retained.
PubMed ID
26374820 View in PubMed
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High degree of BMI misclassification of malnutrition among Swedish elderly population: Age-adjusted height estimation using knee height and demispan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270064
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 May;69(5):565-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
N N Gavriilidou
M. Pihlsgård
S. Elmståhl
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 May;69(5):565-71
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Anthropometry - methods
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Knee - anatomy & histology
Male
Malnutrition - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Reference Values
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The degree of misclassification of obesity and undernutrition among elders owing to inaccurate height measurements is investigated using height predicted by knee height (KH) and demispan equations.
Cross-sectional investigation was done among a random heterogeneous sample from five municipalities in Southern Sweden from a general population study 'Good Aging in Skåne' (GÅS). The sample comprised two groups: group 1 (KH) including 2839 GÅS baseline participants aged 60-93 years with a valid KH measurement and group 2 (demispan) including 2871 GÅS follow-up examination participants (1573 baseline; 1298 new), aged 60-99 years, with a valid demispan measurement. Participation rate was 80%. Height, weight, KH and demispan were measured. KH and demispan equations were formulated using linear regression analysis among participants aged 60-64 years as reference. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated in kg/m(2).
Undernutrition prevalences in men and women were 3.9 and 8.6% by KH, compared with 2.4 and 5.4% by standard BMI, and more pronounced for all women aged 85+ years (21% vs 11.3%). The corresponding value in women aged 85+ years by demispan was 16.5% vs 10% by standard BMI. Obesity prevalences in men and women were 17.5 and 14.6% by KH, compared with 19.0 and 20.03% by standard BMI. Values among women aged 85+ years were 3.7% vs 10.4% by KH and 6.5% vs 12.7% by demispan compared with the standard.
There is an age-related misclassification of undernutrition and obesity attributed to inaccurate height estimation among the elderly. This could affect the management of patients at true risk. We therefore propose using KH- and demispan-based formulae to address this issue.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25205322 View in PubMed
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Identification and follow-up of obesity in ten-year-old school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86020
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3(2):102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mériaux Benita Gunnarsson
Hellström Anna-Lena
Mårild Staffan
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. benita.g.meriaux@comhem.se
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3(2):102-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Case-Control Studies
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Growth surveillance of children in school health services is a routine in Sweden. We describe the effect at follow-up of an overt identification of obesity in school children. METHODS: Follow-up data were collected in two populations of ten-year-old children with obesity. Children in the study group belonged to a cohort born in 1990. Here the presence of obesity had been identified at the routine growth screening, and intervention activities against obesity had been actively offered. Controls belonged to a cohort born in 1989. RESULTS: Of the 176 children with obesity, 91 were in the study group (41 girls) and 85 (44 girls) in the control group. No differences were found between the groups in age, gender or body mass index at baseline. At follow-up, after one to two years, children in the study group had a modest but significantly more pronounced decrease in the relative body mass index, compared with controls. The mean difference between the populations in body mass index standard deviation score (z-score) after adjustment for baseline body mass index and follow-up time was -0.14 (95% confidence interval: -0.25 to -0.02; P=0.027). Socioeconomic status, gender, follow-up time and group were independent predictors for change in body mass index z-score. CONCLUSIONS: To identify children with obesity in a routine school health survey may be a crucial initial step in the management of childhood obesity.
PubMed ID
18465436 View in PubMed
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Impact of obesity on long-term prognosis following acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176426
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2005 Jan;98(1):123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Charlotte Kragelund
Christian Hassager
Per Hildebrandt
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Lars Køber
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology and Endocrinology, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57-59, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark. kragelund@dadlnet.dk
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2005 Jan;98(1):123-31
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Indoles - therapeutic use
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
To evaluate the impact of obesity on mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction.
This study comprises 6676 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction screened for entry into the Danish Trandolapril Cardiac Evaluation (TRACE) study. At baseline, body mass index (BMI) and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were measured. Survival status was determined after 8-10 years.
BMI was used to divide patients into 4 groups: underweight, normal weight, overweight and obese. The normal weight group was used as reference for the other groups. WHR was divided in quartiles and the lowest quartile was used as reference for the three other quartiles. The prevalence of overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) were 48% and 13% in males and 31% and 13% in females. Obese patients were younger, less often smokers and more frequently suffered from diabetes and hypertension. In both men and women, there was no association between obesity assessed as BMI and mortality [men: adjusted RR=0.99 (0.85-1.14, p=0.3); women: adjusted RR=0.90 (0.74-1.10, p=0.2)]. Men with WHR in the upper quartile had an increased mortality [adjusted RR=1.21 (1.07-1.37, p
PubMed ID
15676176 View in PubMed
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Long-Lasting Obesity Predicts Poor Work Ability at Midlife: A 15-Year Follow-Up of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276129
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2015 Dec;57(12):1262-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Nina Nevanperä
Leena Ala-Mursula
Jorma Seitsamo
Jouko Remes
Juha Auvinen
Leila Hopsu
Päivi Husman
Jaro Karppinen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Jaana Laitinen
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2015 Dec;57(12):1262-8
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Occupational Health
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Self Report
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
To investigate the effect of adulthood obesity on work ability in early midlife during a 15-year follow-up.
The study population included men and women (n?=?5470), born in northern Finland in 1966. Participants evaluated their current perceived work ability compared with their lifetime best at the age of 46. Participants' weight and height were measured at 31 years and self-reported at 46 years, and body mass indexes were calculated.
Obesity at both ages, and developing obesity between the ages of 31 and 46 increased the relative risk of poor work ability at 46 years among sexes, and among those in both low and high physically strenuous work.
Long-term obesity and developing obesity in mid-adulthood increase the risk of poor work ability. Thus, the promotion of healthy behaviors by policies, healthcare services, and at workplaces is important.
PubMed ID
26641822 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.