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Adiposity among children in Norway by urbanity and maternal education: a nationally representative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107305
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:842
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anna Biehl
Ragnhild Hovengen
Else-Karin Grøholt
Jøran Hjelmesæth
Bjørn Heine Strand
Haakon E Meyer
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P,O, Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. anna.biehl@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:842
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mothers - education
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Public Health
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
International research has demonstrated that rural residency is a risk factor for childhood adiposity. The main aim of this study was to investigate the urban-rural gradient in overweight and obesity and whether the association differed by maternal education.
Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured in a nationally representative sample of 3166 Norwegian eight-year-olds in 2010. Anthropometric measures were stratified by area of residence (urbanity) and maternal education. Risk estimates for overweight (including obesity) and waist-to-height ratio =0.5 were calculated by log-binomial regression.
Mean BMI and WC and risk estimates of overweight (including obesity) and waist-to-height ratio =0.5 were associated with both urbanity and maternal education. These associations were robust after mutual adjustment for each other. Furthermore, there was an indication of interaction between urbanity and maternal education, as trends of mean BMI and WC increased from urban to rural residence among children of low-educated mothers (p?=?0.01 for both BMI and WC), whereas corresponding trends for children from higher educational background were non-significant (p?>?0.30). However, formal tests of the interaction term urbanity by maternal education were non-significant (p-value for interaction was 0.29 for BMI and 0.31 for WC).
In this nationally representative study, children living rurally and children of low-educated mothers had higher mean BMI and waist circumference than children living in more urban areas and children of higher educated mothers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24028668 View in PubMed
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Adolescent body mass index and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in relation to colorectal cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283749
Source
Gut. 2016 Aug;65(8):1289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Elizabeth D Kantor
Ruzan Udumyan
Lisa B Signorello
Edward L Giovannucci
Scott Montgomery
Katja Fall
Source
Gut. 2016 Aug;65(8):1289-95
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Sedimentation
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Adult obesity and inflammation have been associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, less is known about how adolescent body mass index (BMI) and inflammation, as measured by erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), relate to CRC risk. We sought to evaluate these associations in a cohort of 239 658 Swedish men who underwent compulsory military enlistment examinations in late adolescence (ages 16-20 years).
At the time of the conscription assessment (1969-1976), height and weight were measured and ESR was assayed. By linkage to the national cancer registry, these conscripts were followed for CRC through 1 January 2010. Over an average of 35 years of follow-up, 885 cases of CRC occurred, including 501 colon cancers and 384 rectal cancers. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted HRs and corresponding 95% CIs.
Compared with normal weight (BMI 18.5 to
Notes
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PubMed ID
25986947 View in PubMed
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Are Eskimos more or less obese than other Canadians? A comparison of skinfold thickness and ponderal index in Canadian Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2201
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1977 Oct; 30(10):1623-1628.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
Schaefer, O.
Author Affiliation
Northern Medical Research Laboratory (Edmonton)
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1977 Oct; 30(10):1623-1628.
Date
1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Height
Weight
Nutrition
Growth and development
Ponderal index
Abdomen - anatomy & histology
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anthropometry - standards
Arm - anatomy & histology
Body constitution
Canada
Cholesterol - blood
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Shoulder - anatomy & histology
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
Skinfold thickness, height, and weight measurements were recorded from 1964 through 1970 for more than 1,000 adult Eskimos who resided in the Central and Eastern Canadian Arctic. Among the men and women of all age groups, 70 to 83% had a low ponderal index (PI less than 12.5). Nutrition Canada reported similar rates in 200 adult Eskimos and therefore considered Eskimos, especially Eskimo men, as more obese than other Canadians. Thin skinfolds were found in most Eskimo men, including those with a low PI. The usefulness of the PI or other height/weight indices for appraisal of body fatness and prevalence of obesity in different population groups is questioned. Marked sex differences were found in the ratio of the skinfold thickness over the triceps to the mean thickness of two sites on the trunk (subscapular and suprailiac). Thus, use of the arm plus trunk sites provides important information about subcutaneous fat distribution, and comparisons of prevalence of obesity in different sex and age groups based only on arm skinfold measurements may be inappropriate.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1277.
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Are females at special risk of obesity if they become psychotic? The longitudinal Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82425
Source
Schizophr Res. 2006 May;84(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Hakko Helinä
Komulainen M Tuomas
Koponen Hannu
Saari Kaisa
Laitinen Jaana
Järvelin Marjo-Riitta
Lindeman Sari
Author Affiliation
Oulu University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, P.O. Box 26, 90029 Oulu University Hospital, Finland. helina.hakko@oulu.fi
Source
Schizophr Res. 2006 May;84(1):15-9
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Catchment Area (Health)
Cohort Studies
Demography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Male
Motor Activity
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
Obesity is a serious health problem, especially in patients with long-term mental disorders. We explored the socio-demographic, psychiatric, and clinical factors that increase the risk of changing from under- or normal weight in adolescence to overweight/obese in adulthood. We found a 3.6-fold risk of weight gain in females with psychotic disorder. Other significant correlates of weight gain in males were physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, high alcohol consumption, and being single; and in females, chronic diseases, physical inactivity, high alcohol consumption, and having at least three children. These findings emphasize the importance of regular weight monitoring in clinical practice, especially in females with psychotic disorders.
PubMed ID
16626939 View in PubMed
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Are parents aware that their children are overweight or obese? Do they care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161275
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Sep;53(9):1493-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Meizi He
Anita Evans
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, Brescia University College, 1285 Western Rd, London, ON N6G 1H2, Canada. mhe@uwo.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Sep;53(9):1493-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Parents
Social Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To compare children's actual weight status with their parents' perceptions of their weight status.
Cross-sectional study, including a self-administered questionnaire.
Seven elementary schools in Middlesex-London, Ont.
A convenience sample of pupils in grades 4 to 6 and their parents. Of the 770 child-parent pairs targeted, 355 pairs participated in the study.
Children's weight, height, and body mass index (BMI). Parents' perceptions of their children's weight status, family demographics, and parents' self-reported body weight and height. The United States Centers for Disease Control's BMI-for-age references were used to define children's weight status (underweight, overweight, or obese).
Response rate was 46%. Children's actual weight status (ie, 29.9% overweight or obese and 1.4% underweight) was different from their parents' perceptions of their weight status (ie, 18.3% overweight or obese and 17.2% slightly underweight or underweight). Factors such as children's sex and ethnicity and mothers' weight influenced parents' ability to recognize their children's weight status. Parents' misperceptions of their children's weight status seemed to be unrelated to their levels of education, their family income, or their children's ages.
A large proportion of parents did not recognize that their children were overweight or obese. Effective public health strategies to increase parents' awareness of their children's weight status could be the first key steps in an effort to prevent childhood obesity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17872878 View in PubMed
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Association between obesity and atopy in adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142770
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2010;153(4):372-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Yue Chen
Donna Rennie
Yvon Cormier
James Dosman
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont., Canada. ychen@uottawa.ca
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2010;153(4):372-7
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Canada
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Skin Tests
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Previous literature on the association between obesity and atopy has been inconsistent. The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between obesity and atopic sensitization in adults.
The study included a total of 1,997 residents aged 18-79 years and was conducted in the town of Humboldt, Sask., Canada in 2003. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were objectively measured. Allergy skin tests were conducted to determine atopic sensitization.
Overall, the prevalence of one or more positive skin tests for atopy was 33.3% among those with a BMI of at least 30.0, 28.2% among those with a BMI of 25.0-29.9 and 27.3% among those with a BMI of less than 25 (p = 0.003). The odds ratio for atopy among those with a BMI of at least 30.0 versus those with a BMI of less than 25.0 was 1.51 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.17, 1.95) after adjustment for sex, age, and other covariates. Stratified by sex, the adjusted odds ratios for obesity versus normal weight were 1.27 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.93) for men and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.18, 2.26) for women. WC was also significantly associated with the prevalence of atopy in both sexes after controlling for covariates.
The data demonstrated a significant association between obesity, defined either by BMI or by WC, and atopy.
Notes
Comment In: Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2010;153(4):321-220558997
PubMed ID
20559003 View in PubMed
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Association between obesity and periodontal risk indicators in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141567
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e264-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Thomas Modéer
Cecilia Blomberg
Biniyam Wondimu
Tülay Yucel Lindberg
Claude Marcus
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. thomas.modeer@ki.se
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e264-70
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - analysis
Adolescent
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Plaque - epidemiology
Female
Gingival Crevicular Fluid - immunology
Gingivitis - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation Mediators - analysis
Interleukin-1beta - analysis
Interleukin-8 - analysis
Logistic Models
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Periodontal Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 - analysis
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - analysis
Abstract
In a cross-sectional study design we test the hypothesis of whether obesity in adolescence is associated with periodontal risk indicators or disease.
Obese adolescents (n=52) and normal weight subjects (n=52) with a mean age of 14.5 years were clinically examined with respect to dental plaque, gingival inflammation, periodontal pockets and incipient alveolar bone loss. The subjects answered a questionnaire concerning medical conditions, oral hygiene habits, smoking habits and sociodemographic background. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and adjusted for age and gender (BMI-SDS). Samples of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were analyzed for the levels of adiponectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), interleukin-1ß (IL-ß), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a).
Obese subjects exhibited more gingival inflammation (P4 mm) (P
PubMed ID
20707762 View in PubMed
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Association between overweight and low back pain: a population-based prospective cohort study of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267114
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 May 20;38(12):1026-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2013
Author
Paula Hannele Mikkonen
Jaana Laitinen
Jouko Remes
Tuija Tammelin
Simo Taimela
Kaisu Kaikkonen
Paavo Zitting
Raija Korpelainen
Jaro Karppinen
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 May 20;38(12):1026-33
Date
May-20-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body mass index
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Odds Ratio
Pain Measurement
Pediatric Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
A prospective cohort study in adolescents aged 7 to 19 years.
To evaluate whether persistent overweight increases the risk of low back pain (LBP) among adolescents.
Overweight and LBP are common health problems in adolescents. Their relationship is still controversial among adolescents, as well as among adults.
The study population, the Oulu Back Study, was drawn from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. The final study sample included 1660 adolescents (56% females). The subcohort of 786 subjects (57% females) was used in the analysis of waist circumference. The association between the area under the curve of body mass index from 7 to 16 years, and from 16 to 18 years, and area under the curve of waist circumference from 16 to 19 years, and LBP during the past 6 months was evaluated separately for incident (reporting LBP at 18 or 19 yr but not at 16 yr) and persistent LBP (reporting LBP at 16 and 18 yr or 19 yr). Relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were adjusted for smoking, leisure time physical activity, and family socioeconomic status at 16 years and stratified by sex.
Body mass index from 16 to 18 years among girls and body mass index from 7 to 16 years among boys predicted incident LBP at 18 years (girls: RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.18; boys: RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.00-1.32). Among boys, waist circumference from 16 to 19 years was also associated with incident LBP (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.02-1.32). Overweight was not associated with persistent LBP.
In this population-based cohort study, persistent overweight slightly increased the risk of incident LBP, but the time period during which overweight was related to incident LBP differed between sexes.
2.
PubMed ID
23459137 View in PubMed
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Associations between body mass index and development of metabolic disorders in fertile women--a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258281
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014;3(2):e000672
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Michelle Dalgas Schmiegelow
Charlotte Andersson
Lars Køber
Søren Skøtt Andersen
Mette Lykke Norgaard
Thomas Bo Jensen
Gunnar Gislason
Siv Mari Berger
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Gentofte University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014;3(2):e000672
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dyslipidemias - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Fertility
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Metabolic disorders are relatively uncommon in young women, but may increase with obesity. The associations between body mass index (BMI) and risks of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in apparently healthy, young women have been insufficiently investigated, and are the aims of this study.
Women giving birth during the years 2004-2009, with no history of cardiovascular disease, renal insufficiency, pregnancy-associated metabolic disorders, diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia were identified in nationwide registers. Women were categorized as underweight (BMI
Notes
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PubMed ID
24721798 View in PubMed
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Associations between estimated aerobic fitness and cardiovascular risk factors in adults with different levels of abdominal obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175619
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2005 Apr;12(2):126-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Katja Borodulin
Tiina Laatikainen
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Timo A Lakka
Raija Laukkanen
Seppo Sarna
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Helsinki, Finland. katja.borodulin@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2005 Apr;12(2):126-31
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Blood Chemical Analysis
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
We investigated the association between estimated aerobic fitness and cardiovascular risk factors, and how the association is affected by abdominal obesity.
Cross-sectional population study.
Participants comprised 3820 adults aged 25 to 64 years from the FINRISK 2002 Study in Finland. Aerobic fitness was estimated using a non-exercise test. Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides, HDL-C to total cholesterol ratio, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels were measured by standardized methods.
After controlling for age, smoking and alcohol consumption, aerobic fitness was inversely associated with systolic (P=0.027) and diastolic (P
PubMed ID
15785297 View in PubMed
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