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[10-year trends in body weight in men and women in Novosibirsk (1985-1995)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174900
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
E S Kylbanova
S K Maliutina
N V Nasonova
Iu P Nikitin
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Siberia
Weight Gain
Abstract
To assess 10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity in Novosibirsk population.
The data of three population surveys (a total of 9714 men and women aged 25-64 years) carried out according to WHO MONICA program.
Obesity prevalence among males in 1985-1989 tended to a small rise without changes during subsequent 5 years. In females the prevalence of obesity and overweight decreased in 1985-1994.
10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity were insignificant in men and beneficial in women of Novosibirsk population while the frequency of increased body mass in women remains relatively high.
PubMed ID
15881103 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Canadian adults: biological, environmental, and behavioral correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141385
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
L S Greene-Finestone
C. Berger
M. de Groh
D A Hanley
N. Hidiroglou
K. Sarafin
S. Poliquin
J. Krieger
J B Richards
D. Goltzman
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. linda.greene-finestone@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Skin Pigmentation - physiology
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We assessed vitamin D status and its correlates in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Results showed that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
PubMed ID
20730415 View in PubMed
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40-year follow-up of overweight children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38058
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1989
Author
H O Mossberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Date
Aug-26-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
504 overweight children admitted to hospital between 1921 and 1947 were followed up for 40 years by questionnaires at 10 year intervals. The mean weight for height (W/H) standard deviation score (SDS) reached a maximum in puberty (+3.5). The SDS fell to about +1 in adulthood. 47% patients were still obese (SDS greater than +1) in adulthood; 84.6% of these had SDS more than +2 in childhood. The degree of obesity in the family (parents and grandparents) and the degree of overweight in puberty were the most important factors for weight level in adulthood. Even when their food intake was in accordance with recommended levels, obese children had higher than normal weight as adults. Excessive overweight in puberty (SDS greater than +3) was associated with higher than expected morbidity and mortality in adult life. Weight-reducing measures should be started early in life to improve the unfavourable long-term prognosis for very obese children.
PubMed ID
2570196 View in PubMed
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A 40-year history of overweight children in Stockholm: life-time overweight, morbidity, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23563
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. DiPietro
H O Mossberg
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Digestive System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We describe the 40-year weight history and adult morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 504 overweight children, aged 2 months to 16 years, who were admitted for investigation of their overweight to four children's hospitals in Stockholm between 1921 and 1947. Follow-up information was gathered by questionnaire at 10-year intervals, most recently in 1980-1983 (n = 458), on weight history (based on the body mass index (BMI = kg/m2)), as well as prevalence of cardiovascular disease (n = 143), diabetes (n = 39), and cancer (all types (n = 20)), reported during the 40 years of follow-up, and mortality from all causes (n = 55), determined from death certificate. The sample of overweight children remained overweight as adults; after age 55 years, the BMI began to decline for both genders. Female subjects were heavier than their male counterparts from postpuberty onward. Subjects who died by the 40-year follow-up and those reporting cardiovascular disease were significantly (P
PubMed ID
7812410 View in PubMed
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Abdominal and gynoid adiposity and the risk of stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136783
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1427-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
F. Toss
P. Wiklund
P W Franks
M. Eriksson
Y. Gustafson
G. Hallmans
P. Nordström
A. Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1427-32
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - pathology - radiography
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - pathology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - pathology - radiography
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous studies have indicated that fat distribution is important in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated the association between fat distribution, as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and the incidence of stroke.
A cohort of 2751 men and women aged =40 years was recruited. Baseline levels of abdominal, gynoid and total body fat were measured by DXA. Body mass index (BMI, kg?m(-2)) was calculated. Stroke incidence was recorded using the regional stroke registry until subjects reached 75 years of age.
During a mean follow-up time of 8 years and 9 months, 91 strokes occurred. Of the adiposity indices accessed abdominal fat mass was the best predictor of stroke in women (hazard ratio (HR)=1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.23-2.24 per standard deviation increase), whereas the ratio of gynoid fat to total fat mass was associated with a decreased risk of stroke (HR=0.72, 95% CI=0.54-0.96). Abdominal fat mass was the only of the adiposity indices assessed that was found to be a significant predictor of stroke in men (HR=1.49, 95% CI=1.06-2.09). The associations between abdominal fat mass and stroke remained significant in both women and men after adjustment for BMI (HR=1.80, 95% CI=1.06-3.07; HR=1.71, 95% CI=1.13-2.59, respectively). However, in a subgroup analyses abdominal fat was not a significant predictor after further adjustment for diabetes, smoking and hypertension.
Abdominal fat mass is a risk factor for stroke independent of BMI, but not independent of diabetes, smoking and hypertension. This indicates that the excess in stroke risk associated with abdominal fat mass is at least partially mediated through traditional stroke risk factors.
PubMed ID
21343905 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of psychosocial and lifestyle factors and risk of low back pain in adolescence: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276396
Source
Eur Spine J. 2016 Feb;25(2):635-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Paula Mikkonen
Eveliina Heikkala
Markus Paananen
Jouko Remes
Simo Taimela
Juha Auvinen
Jaro Karppinen
Source
Eur Spine J. 2016 Feb;25(2):635-42
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Internal-External Control
Life Style
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Male
Motor Activity
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Low back pain (LBP) is common already in adolescence, and many risk indicators including both psychosocial and lifestyle factors have been recognized. Our purpose was to assess whether the co-occurrence of psychosocial (externalizing and internalizing) problems and lifestyle factors (leisure time physical activity, sedentary behaviour, sleep, smoking, and overweight/obesity) associate with LBP at 16 years cross-sectionally or with new LBP at 18-year follow-up.
The study population, drawn from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, consisted of 1625 participants (712 boys and 913 girls) who completed a questionnaire on potential explanatory factors at 16 years and on LBP at 16 and 18 years. The outcome measure was 'reporting LBP' or 'consultation for LBP' during the past 6 months. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was utilized to study the co-occurrence of the explanatory factors.
Among both genders, four clusters were found. Externalizing behaviour problems were associated with 'reporting LBP' (RR 1.5, boys 1.4, girls) and 'consultation for LBP' (RR 1.6 for both genders) at baseline among both genders. In addition, the cluster of multiple risk behaviours was associated with both 'reporting LBP' (RR 1.3) and 'consultation for LBP' (RR 2.5) and the obese cluster with 'consultation for LBP' (RR 1.7) among girls. Externalizing behaviour problems at 16 years predicted 'consultation for LBP' at 18 years among girls (RR 3.6).
Our results stress the role of psychosocial factors in reporting and seeking care for adolescent LBP.
PubMed ID
26070550 View in PubMed
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Addressing the obesity epidemic: what is the dentist's role?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160732
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Oct;73(8):707-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Jean-Philippe Chaput
Jo-Anne Gilbert
Christian Caron
Belinda Nicolau
Angelo Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Division of Kinesiology (PEPS), Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Oct;73(8):707-9
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Dentists
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Professional Role
Risk factors
Tooth Loss - complications
PubMed ID
17949536 View in PubMed
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The adverse association of diabetes with risk of first acute myocardial infarction is modified by physical activity and body mass index: prospective data from the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271842
Source
Diabetologia. 2015 Jan;58(1):59-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Børge Moe
Liv B Augestad
W Dana Flanders
Håvard Dalen
Tom I L Nilsen
Source
Diabetologia. 2015 Jan;58(1):59-66
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cause of Death
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Diabetes increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and effective means for primary prevention are warranted. We prospectively examined the joint association of diabetes and leisure-time physical activity, as well as of diabetes and BMI, with the risk of AMI.
A total of 55,534 men and women in the Norwegian HUNT Study were followed-up for first AMI by hospital admission registries and the Cause of Death Registry. Cox proportional adjusted HRs with 95% CIs were estimated.
Overall, 1,887 incident AMIs occurred during 12.3 years. Compared with inactive people without diabetes, inactive people with diabetes had an HR of 2.37 (95% CI 1.58, 3.57), whereas the HR among highly active persons with diabetes was 1.04 (95% CI 0.62, 1.74). Normal-weight (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m(2)) persons with diabetes had an HR of 1.60 (95% CI 1.05, 2.44) and obese (BMI?>?30 kg/m(2)) persons with diabetes had an HR of 2.55 (95% CI 1.97, 3.29) compared with normal-weight persons without diabetes. The data suggest biological interaction between diabetes and physical activity, with a relative excess risk of inactivity and diabetes of 1.43 (95% CI 0.08, 2.78). For obesity and diabetes, the excess risk due to interaction was smaller (0.67; 95% CI -0.24, 1.58).
Body weight and, in particular, physical activity modified the association between diabetes and risk of first AMI. This highlights the potential importance of physical activity and weight maintenance in primary prevention of AMI among people with diabetes.
PubMed ID
25297571 View in PubMed
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Aetiology and risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders in physically active conscripts: a follow-up study in the Finnish Defence Forces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142413
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:146
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Henri Taanila
Jaana Suni
Harri Pihlajamäki
Ville M Mattila
Olli Ohrankämmen
Petteri Vuorinen
Jari Parkkari
Author Affiliation
Tampere Research Centre of Sports Medicine, the UKK Institute, PO Box 30, 33501 Tampere, Finland. henri.taanila@uta.fi
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:146
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Therapy - methods
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Young Adult
Abstract
Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the main reason for morbidity during military training. MSDs commonly result in functional impairment leading to premature discharge from military service and disabilities requiring long-term rehabilitation. The purpose of the study was to examine associations between various risk factors and MSDs with special attention to the physical fitness of the conscripts.
Two successive cohorts of 18 to 28-year-old male conscripts (N = 944, median age 19) were followed for six months. MSDs, including overuse and acute injuries, treated at the garrison clinic were identified and analysed. Associations between MSDs and risk factors were examined by multivariate Cox's proportional hazard models.
During the six-month follow-up of two successive cohorts there were 1629 MSDs and 2879 health clinic visits due to MSDs in 944 persons. The event-based incidence rate for MSD was 10.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 10.0-11.1) per 1000 person-days. Most MSDs were in the lower extremities (65%) followed by the back (18%). The strongest baseline factors associated with MSDs were poor result in the combined outcome of a 12-minute running test and back lift test (hazard ratio (HR) 2.9; 95% CI: 1.9-4.6), high waist circumference (HR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3-2.2), high body mass index (HR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.3-2.4), poor result in a 12-minute running test (HR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.2-2.2), earlier musculoskeletal symptoms (HR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3-2.1) and poor school success (educational level and grades combined; HR 2.0; 95% CI: 1.3-3.0). In addition, risk factors of long-term MSDs (>or=10 service days lost due to one or several MSDs) were analysed: poor result in a 12-minute running test, earlier musculoskeletal symptoms, high waist circumference, high body mass index, not belonging to a sports club and poor result in the combined outcome of the 12-minute running test and standing long jump test were strongly associated with long-term MSDs.
The majority of the observed risk factors are modifiable and favourable for future interventions. An appropriate intervention based on the present study would improve both aerobic and muscular fitness prior to conscript training. Attention to appropriate waist circumference and body mass index would strengthen the intervention. Effective results from well-planned randomised controlled studies are needed before initiating large-scale prevention programmes in a military environment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20602765 View in PubMed
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256 records – page 1 of 26.