Skip header and navigation

Refine By

887 records – page 1 of 89.

[10-year trends in body weight in men and women in Novosibirsk (1985-1995)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174900
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
E S Kylbanova
S K Maliutina
N V Nasonova
Iu P Nikitin
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Siberia
Weight Gain
Abstract
To assess 10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity in Novosibirsk population.
The data of three population surveys (a total of 9714 men and women aged 25-64 years) carried out according to WHO MONICA program.
Obesity prevalence among males in 1985-1989 tended to a small rise without changes during subsequent 5 years. In females the prevalence of obesity and overweight decreased in 1985-1994.
10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity were insignificant in men and beneficial in women of Novosibirsk population while the frequency of increased body mass in women remains relatively high.
PubMed ID
15881103 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 24-week dietary and physical activity lifestyle intervention reduces hepatic insulin resistance in the obese with chronic hepatitis C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117638
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Venessa Pattullo
Andres Duarte-Rojo
Wael Soliman
Florencia Vargas-Vorackova
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Ivan G Fantus
Johane Allard
Jenny Heathcote
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Basal Metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hepatitis C, Chronic - complications - pathology
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - complications - diet therapy - therapy
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Obesity- and virus-mediated insulin resistance (IR) are associated with adverse hepatic and metabolic outcomes in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This study evaluates the tolerability and effects of a dietary and physical activity (PA) intervention in obese patients with insulin-resistant CHC.
Obese patients (body mass index, BMI =30 kg/m(2) ) with CHC were recruited prospectively. Non-diabetic patients with IR (homeostasis model assessment of IR, HOMA-IR >2.0) proceeded to a 24-week lifestyle intervention comprising pedometer monitored increase in PA (=10 000 steps/day) and an individualised dietary plan.
Ten non-cirrhotic and six cirrhotic patients [age 52 ± 8.5 years, BMI 35.9 (31.46-38.21)kg/m(2) ] were recruited, of whom all 16 (100%) completed the 24-week protocol. Increase in PA from 6853 (2440-9533) to 10 697 (7959-13566) steps/day (P = 0.001) and reduction in caloric intake from 2263 (1805.4-2697.0) to 1281 (1099.5-1856.3) kcal/day (equivalent to reduction of median 33% (25.3-49.8%), P
PubMed ID
23278982 View in PubMed
Less detail

25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Canadian adults: biological, environmental, and behavioral correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141385
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
L S Greene-Finestone
C. Berger
M. de Groh
D A Hanley
N. Hidiroglou
K. Sarafin
S. Poliquin
J. Krieger
J B Richards
D. Goltzman
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. linda.greene-finestone@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Skin Pigmentation - physiology
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We assessed vitamin D status and its correlates in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Results showed that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
PubMed ID
20730415 View in PubMed
Less detail

40-year follow-up of overweight children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38058
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1989
Author
H O Mossberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Date
Aug-26-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
504 overweight children admitted to hospital between 1921 and 1947 were followed up for 40 years by questionnaires at 10 year intervals. The mean weight for height (W/H) standard deviation score (SDS) reached a maximum in puberty (+3.5). The SDS fell to about +1 in adulthood. 47% patients were still obese (SDS greater than +1) in adulthood; 84.6% of these had SDS more than +2 in childhood. The degree of obesity in the family (parents and grandparents) and the degree of overweight in puberty were the most important factors for weight level in adulthood. Even when their food intake was in accordance with recommended levels, obese children had higher than normal weight as adults. Excessive overweight in puberty (SDS greater than +3) was associated with higher than expected morbidity and mortality in adult life. Weight-reducing measures should be started early in life to improve the unfavourable long-term prognosis for very obese children.
PubMed ID
2570196 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 40-year history of overweight children in Stockholm: life-time overweight, morbidity, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23563
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. DiPietro
H O Mossberg
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Digestive System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We describe the 40-year weight history and adult morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 504 overweight children, aged 2 months to 16 years, who were admitted for investigation of their overweight to four children's hospitals in Stockholm between 1921 and 1947. Follow-up information was gathered by questionnaire at 10-year intervals, most recently in 1980-1983 (n = 458), on weight history (based on the body mass index (BMI = kg/m2)), as well as prevalence of cardiovascular disease (n = 143), diabetes (n = 39), and cancer (all types (n = 20)), reported during the 40 years of follow-up, and mortality from all causes (n = 55), determined from death certificate. The sample of overweight children remained overweight as adults; after age 55 years, the BMI began to decline for both genders. Female subjects were heavier than their male counterparts from postpuberty onward. Subjects who died by the 40-year follow-up and those reporting cardiovascular disease were significantly (P
PubMed ID
7812410 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal and gynoid adipose distribution and incident myocardial infarction in women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143340
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34(12):1752-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
P. Wiklund
F. Toss
J-H Jansson
M. Eliasson
G. Hallmans
A. Nordström
P W Franks
P. Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34(12):1752-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology - radionuclide imaging
Blood Glucose - physiology
Body Composition
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Hypertriglyceridemia - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Obesity - complications
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
The relationships between objectively measured abdominal and gynoid adipose mass with the prospective risk of myocardial infarction (MI) has been scarcely investigated. We aimed to investigate the associations between fat distribution and the risk of MI.
Total and regional fat mass was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in 2336 women and 922 men, of whom 104 subsequently experienced an MI during a mean follow-up time of 7.8 years.
In women, the strongest independent predictor of MI was the ratio of abdominal to gynoid adipose mass (hazard ratio (HR)=2.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.79-3.32 per s.d. increase in adipose mass), after adjustment for age and smoking. This ratio also showed a strong association with hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and hypertriglyceridemia (P
PubMed ID
20498655 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal and gynoid adiposity and the risk of stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136783
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1427-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
F. Toss
P. Wiklund
P W Franks
M. Eriksson
Y. Gustafson
G. Hallmans
P. Nordström
A. Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1427-32
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - pathology - radiography
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - pathology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - pathology - radiography
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous studies have indicated that fat distribution is important in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated the association between fat distribution, as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and the incidence of stroke.
A cohort of 2751 men and women aged =40 years was recruited. Baseline levels of abdominal, gynoid and total body fat were measured by DXA. Body mass index (BMI, kg?m(-2)) was calculated. Stroke incidence was recorded using the regional stroke registry until subjects reached 75 years of age.
During a mean follow-up time of 8 years and 9 months, 91 strokes occurred. Of the adiposity indices accessed abdominal fat mass was the best predictor of stroke in women (hazard ratio (HR)=1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.23-2.24 per standard deviation increase), whereas the ratio of gynoid fat to total fat mass was associated with a decreased risk of stroke (HR=0.72, 95% CI=0.54-0.96). Abdominal fat mass was the only of the adiposity indices assessed that was found to be a significant predictor of stroke in men (HR=1.49, 95% CI=1.06-2.09). The associations between abdominal fat mass and stroke remained significant in both women and men after adjustment for BMI (HR=1.80, 95% CI=1.06-3.07; HR=1.71, 95% CI=1.13-2.59, respectively). However, in a subgroup analyses abdominal fat was not a significant predictor after further adjustment for diabetes, smoking and hypertension.
Abdominal fat mass is a risk factor for stroke independent of BMI, but not independent of diabetes, smoking and hypertension. This indicates that the excess in stroke risk associated with abdominal fat mass is at least partially mediated through traditional stroke risk factors.
PubMed ID
21343905 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal fat distribution and disease: an overview of epidemiological data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11905
Source
Ann Med. 1992 Feb;24(1):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
P. Björntorp
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Ann Med. 1992 Feb;24(1):15-8
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adipose Tissue - metabolism - pathology
Anthropometry
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Female
Hip
Humans
Male
Obesity - complications - metabolism - pathology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Recent prospective, epidemiological research has demonstrated the power of an increased waist/hip circumference ratio (WHR) to predict both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in men and women. Obesity, defined as an increased total body fat mass, seems to interact synergistically in the development of NIDDM, but not of CVD. Increased WHR with obesity (abdominal obesity) seems to be associated with a cluster of metabolic risk factors, as well as hypertension. This metabolic syndrome is closely linked to visceral fat mass. Increased WHR without obesity may instead be associated with lift style factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, physical inactivity, coagulation abnormalities, psychosocial, psychological and psychiatric factors. Direct observations show, and the risk factor associations further strengthen the assumption, that abdominal (visceral) obesity is more closely associated to NIDDM than CVD, while an increased WHR without obesity may be more closely linked to CVD than NIDDM. It remains to be established to what extent, if any, an increased WHR in lean men, and particularly in lean women, indicates fat distribution. Other components of the WHR measurement might be of more importance in this connection.
PubMed ID
1575956 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal obesity is essential for the risk of venous thromboembolism in the metabolic syndrome: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154041
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2009 May;7(5):739-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
K H Borch
S K Braekkan
E B Mathiesen
I. Njølstad
T. Wilsgaard
J. Størmer
J-B Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Center for Atherothrombotic Research in Tromsø, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø Norway. knut.borch@fagmed.uit.no
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2009 May;7(5):739-45
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Venous Thromboembolism - complications
Abstract
The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, including abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and all cause mortality.
The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of the metabolic syndrome, and its individual components, on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in a prospective population-based study.
Individual components of the metabolic syndrome were registered in 6170 subjects aged 25-84 years in the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995, and first ever VTE events were registered until 1 September 2007.
The metabolic syndrome was present in 21.9% (1350 subjects) of the population. There were 194 validated first VTE events (2.92 per 1000 person-years) during a mean of 10.8 years of follow-up. Presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with increased risk of VTE (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22-2.23) in age- and gender-adjusted analysis. The risk of VTE increased with the number of components in the metabolic syndrome (P
Notes
Comment In: J Thromb Haemost. 2009 May;7(5):736-819245417
PubMed ID
19036065 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulation of psychosocial and lifestyle factors and risk of low back pain in adolescence: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276396
Source
Eur Spine J. 2016 Feb;25(2):635-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Paula Mikkonen
Eveliina Heikkala
Markus Paananen
Jouko Remes
Simo Taimela
Juha Auvinen
Jaro Karppinen
Source
Eur Spine J. 2016 Feb;25(2):635-42
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Internal-External Control
Life Style
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Male
Motor Activity
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Low back pain (LBP) is common already in adolescence, and many risk indicators including both psychosocial and lifestyle factors have been recognized. Our purpose was to assess whether the co-occurrence of psychosocial (externalizing and internalizing) problems and lifestyle factors (leisure time physical activity, sedentary behaviour, sleep, smoking, and overweight/obesity) associate with LBP at 16 years cross-sectionally or with new LBP at 18-year follow-up.
The study population, drawn from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, consisted of 1625 participants (712 boys and 913 girls) who completed a questionnaire on potential explanatory factors at 16 years and on LBP at 16 and 18 years. The outcome measure was 'reporting LBP' or 'consultation for LBP' during the past 6 months. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was utilized to study the co-occurrence of the explanatory factors.
Among both genders, four clusters were found. Externalizing behaviour problems were associated with 'reporting LBP' (RR 1.5, boys 1.4, girls) and 'consultation for LBP' (RR 1.6 for both genders) at baseline among both genders. In addition, the cluster of multiple risk behaviours was associated with both 'reporting LBP' (RR 1.3) and 'consultation for LBP' (RR 2.5) and the obese cluster with 'consultation for LBP' (RR 1.7) among girls. Externalizing behaviour problems at 16 years predicted 'consultation for LBP' at 18 years among girls (RR 3.6).
Our results stress the role of psychosocial factors in reporting and seeking care for adolescent LBP.
PubMed ID
26070550 View in PubMed
Less detail

887 records – page 1 of 89.