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Effects of an antenatal lifestyle intervention on offspring obesity - a 5-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285208
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2017 Sep;96(9):1093-1099
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Ann-Kristin Ronnberg
Ulf Hanson
Kerstin Nilsson
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2017 Sep;96(9):1093-1099
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Obesity, Morbid - prevention & control
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
Strategies to limit excessive maternal gestational weight gain could also have positive health effects for the offspring. This study informs us on the effect of an antenatal lifestyle intervention on offspring body mass index (BMI) trajectory until age five.
A secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial aimed at reducing gestational weight gain, set in Ørebro, Sweden (Clinical Trials.gov Id NCT00451425). Offspring were followed with standardized measures of weight and height until age five. Mean BMI z-score and proportion (%) of over- and undernutrition (BMI z-score > ± 2 standard deviations) was compared between groups. Risk estimates for obesity at age five were analyzed in relation to maternal gestational weight gain and prepregnancy BMI as a secondary outcome.
We analyzed 374 children at birth and 300 at age five. No significant difference in mean BMI z-score was seen at birth (0.68 (I) vs 0.56 (C), p = 0.242) or at age five (0.34 (I) vs 0.26 (C), p = 0.510) and no significant difference in proportion of over- or undernutrition was seen. Excessive maternal gestational weight gain was an independent risk factor for offspring obesity at birth (OR = 4.51, p
PubMed ID
28498482 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-1998
Author
B L Heitmann
M. Osler
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
H:S Kommunehospitalet, Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse, Epidemiologisk Grundforsknings center.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Date
Dec-21-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Food Habits
Heart Diseases - etiology
Humans
Life Style
Neoplasms - etiology
Obesity - complications - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity, Morbid - prevention & control
Risk factors
PubMed ID
9889680 View in PubMed
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Physical activity and quality of life in severely obese adults during a two-year lifestyle intervention programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266685
Source
J Obes. 2015;2015:314194
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Randi Jepsen
Eivind Aadland
Lesley Robertson
Ronette L Kolotkin
John Roger Andersen
Gerd Karin Natvig
Source
J Obes. 2015;2015:314194
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Diet
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Motor Activity
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity, Morbid - prevention & control - psychology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Risk Reduction Behavior
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Abstract
It is unknown how changes in physical activity may affect changes in quality of life (QoL) outcomes during lifestyle interventions for severely obese adults. The purpose of this study was to examine associations in the patterns of change between objectively assessed physical activity as the independent variable and physical, mental, and obesity-specific QoL and life satisfaction as the dependent variables during a two-year lifestyle intervention. Forty-nine severely obese adults (37 women; 43.6 ± 9.4 years; body mass index 42.1 ± 6.0?kg/m(2)) participated in the study. Assessments were conducted four times using Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), Obesity-Related Problems (OP) scale, a single item on life satisfaction, and accelerometers. The physical component summary (PCS) score and the mental component summary (MCS) score were used as SF-36 outcomes. Associations were determined using linear regression analyses and reported as standardized coefficients (stand. coeff.). Change in physical activity was independently associated with change in PCS (stand. coeff. = 0.35, P = .033), MCS (stand. coeff. = 0.51, P = .001), OP (stand. coeff. = -0.31,??P = .018), and life satisfaction (stand. coeff. = 0.39, P = .004) after adjustment for gender, age, and change in body mass index.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25653871 View in PubMed
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