Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Abdominal fat from spine dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and risk for subsequent diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144207
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Jul;95(7):3272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
William D Leslie
Sora M Ludwig
Suzanne Morin
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R2H 2A6. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Jul;95(7):3272-6
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Area Under Curve
Body Composition
Bone Density
Canada
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - diagnosis
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Abstract
Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine provides an index of abdominal fat.
Our objective was to examine the hypothesis that DXA-derived abdominal fat measurement in women undergoing osteoporosis investigation predicts risk for subsequent diagnosis of diabetes.
This historical cohort study was derived from the Manitoba Bone Density Program Database for the Province of Manitoba, Canada.
30,252 nondiabetic women aged 40 yr and older were referred for baseline osteoporosis assessment with DXA between January 1990 and March 2007.
Each woman's longitudinal provincial health service record was assessed for the presence of diabetes diagnosis codes after DXA testing.
During 5.2 + or - 2.6 yr of observation, 1252 (4.1%) women met the case definition for diabetes. A greater proportion of abdominal fat from spine DXA was strongly related to subsequent diabetes diagnosis in models adjusted for age, body mass index, and other comorbidities. Those in the highest quintile had 3.56 (95% confidence interval = 2.67-4.75) times the risk for subsequent diabetes diagnosis compared with those in the lowest (reference) quintile. Fat from hip DXA was not predictive of subsequent diabetes after adjustment for the same variables (1.00, 95% confidence interval = 0.79-1.26).
Predictive information about diabetes risk can be obtained from spine DXA scans performed for osteoporosis risk assessment. This is consistent with evidence linking abdominal fat with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome.
PubMed ID
20392865 View in PubMed
Less detail

BMI and waist circumference cut-offs for corresponding levels of insulin sensitivity in a Middle Eastern immigrant versus a native Swedish population - the MEDIM population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284741
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Dec 09;16(1):1242
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-09-2016
Author
Louise Bennet
Karin Stenkula
Samuel W Cushman
Kerstin Brismar
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Dec 09;16(1):1242
Date
Dec-09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Fasting - blood
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Iraq - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - diagnosis - ethnology
Reference Values
Risk factors
Sweden
Waist Circumference
Abstract
The aim of this study was to identify corresponding body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference cut-offs for equivalent levels of insulin sensitivity in a Middle Eastern immigrant population compared with native Swedes.
Citizens of Malmö, Sweden aged 30 to 75 years, who were born in Iraq or Sweden, were in 2010-2012 invited to participate in a health examination including anthropometrics, oral glucose tolerance test, fasting samples and interviews concerning sociodemographic factors and lifestyle behaviours.
In total, 1176 individuals born in Iraq and 688 born in Sweden, without previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes, participated in the study. In normal weight participants (BMI?
Notes
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2014 Jul;105(1):79-8724842242
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2014 Sep;37(9):2500-724974975
Cites: Med Clin North Am. 2004 Jul;88(4):787-835, ix15308380
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Apr 24;115(16):2111-817420343
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2016 Mar;39(3):472-8526908931
Cites: Lancet. 1991 Feb 16;337(8738):382-61671422
Cites: Diabetes Metab. 2015 Feb;41(1):45-5425284578
Cites: J Intern Med. 2003 Sep;254(3):236-4312930232
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Sep;18(9):1821-620075855
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Nov;100(11):4249-5626308293
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 2000;894:i-xii, 1-25311234459
Cites: Prim Care Diabetes. 2014 Oct;8(3):231-824472421
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2013 Feb;34(5):389-9722947612
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2004 Aug;27(8):2041-615277437
Cites: Diabetes. 1988 Jun;37(6):667-873289989
Cites: Circulation. 2009 Oct 20;120(16):1640-519805654
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 May;20(5):932-822240722
Cites: J Hepatol. 2008;48 Suppl 1:S104-1218304679
Cites: Horm Metab Res. 2002 Nov-Dec;34(11-12):646-912660875
Cites: Diabetes. 1976 Apr;25(4):241-4773721
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2015 Feb;238(2):256-6325540856
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 Aug;34(8):1741-821680722
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011 May 12;11:30321569404
Cites: Diabetes. 2002 Feb;51 Suppl 1:S212-2011815482
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1998 Nov;21(11):1828-359802729
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2015 May;38(5):814-2025665815
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2013 Aug;36(8):2388-9423491523
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Jan 10;363(9403):16314726172
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2008 Jan;79(1):147-5017767973
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2005 Dec;12(6):535-4116319542
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2013 Jun;36(6):1789-9623704681
PubMed ID
27938404 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of metabolic syndrome components in a population of bank employees from St. Petersburg, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132421
Source
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2011 Oct;9(5):337-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Alexandra O Konradi
Oxana P Rotar
Lyudmila S Korostovtseva
Viktoria V Ivanenko
Vladislav N Solntcev
Sergei B Anokhin
Victor A Bart
Eugene V Shlyakhto
Author Affiliation
Almazov Federal Heart, Blood and Endocrinology Center, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation. konradi@almazovcentre.ru
Source
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2011 Oct;9(5):337-43
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Employment
Female
Humans
Hypertension - pathology
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - epidemiology
Models, Statistical
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - diagnosis
Occupational Health
Prevalence
Private Sector
Questionnaires
Russia
Sex Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components according to different criteria in the population of bank employees in St. Petersburg, Russia.
A total of 1,600 office workers were screened at their working places from the Sberbank state bank in St. Petersburg. All subjects were interviewed by a special questionnaire that included personal data, smoking status, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and medical history. Anthropometry measurements, vital signs, and fasting blood samples were obtained. Serum lipids and plasma glucose were measured.
In all, 1,561 responders were included in the final analysis. Hypertension (HTN) was observed in 35.2% of subjects (64% in males and 25.4% in females), abdominal obesity (AO) according to Internation Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria in 45.6% (51.5% in males and 44.0% in females), high triglyceride levels in 28.4%, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in 23.9%, and elevated fasting glucose over 5.6 mmol/L in 28.4% of subjects. AO associated with HTN was observed in 24.3%. Metabolic syndrome according to IDF criteria was diagnosed in 21.5% (17.9% in females and 34.6% in males, P
PubMed ID
21819220 View in PubMed
Less detail