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A < 1.7 cM interval is responsible for Dmo1 obesity phenotypes in OLETF rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47295
Source
Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2004 Jan-Feb;31(1-2):110-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Takeshi K Watanabe
Shiro Okuno
Yuki Yamasaki
Toshihide Ono
Keiko Oga
Ayako Mizoguchi-Miyakita
Hideo Miyao
Mikio Suzuki
Hiroshi Momota
Yoshihiro Goto
Hiroichi Shinomiya
Haretsugu Hishigaki
Isamu Hayashi
Toshihiro Asai
Shigeyuki Wakitani
Toshihisa Takagi
Yusuke Nakamura
Akira Tanigami
Author Affiliation
Otsuka GEN Research Institute, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 463-10 Kagasuno, Kawauchi-cho, Tokushima 771-0192, Japan. tkw_watanabe@research.otsuka.co.jp
Source
Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2004 Jan-Feb;31(1-2):110-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Congenic
Body Weight - genetics
Crosses, Genetic
Diabetes Mellitus - genetics
Female
Hyperglycemia - genetics
Hyperlipidemia - blood - genetics
Male
Obesity
Phenotype
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred OLETF
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
1. Dmo1 (Diabetes Mellitus OLETF type I) is a major quantitative trait locus for dyslipidaemia, obesity and diabetes phenotypes of male Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. 2. Our congenic lines, produced by transferring Dmo1 chromosomal segments from the non-diabetic Brown Norway (BN) rat into the OLETF strain, have confirmed the strong, wide-range therapeutic effects of Dmo1 on dyslipidaemia, obesity and diabetes in the fourth (BC4) and fifth (BC5) generations of congenic animals. Analysis of a relatively small number of BC5 rats (n = 71) suggested that the critical Dmo1 interval lies within a
PubMed ID
14756694 View in PubMed
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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
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ß2-adrenergic receptor Thr164Ile polymorphism, obesity, and diabetes: comparison with FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18 polymorphisms in more than 64,000 individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125626
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jun;97(6):E1074-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Mette Thomsen
Morten Dahl
Anne Tybjærg-Hansen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jun;97(6):E1074-9
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Proteins - genetics
Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4 - genetics
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
The ß(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) influences regulation of energy balance by stimulating catecholamine-induced lipolysis in adipose tissue. The rare functional ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) polymorphism could therefore influence risk of obesity and subsequently diabetes.
We tested the hypothesis that the ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) polymorphism associates with risk of obesity and diabetes and compared effect sizes with those of FTO(rs9939609), MC4R(rs17782313), and TMEM18(rs6548238).
We conducted a population-based cohort study in Copenhagen, Denmark.
We genotyped more than 64,000 individuals from the Danish general population.
We evaluated body mass index (BMI), obesity (BMI =30 kg/m(2)), and diabetes.
Rare allele frequencies were 0.02 for T for ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile), 0.40 for A for FTOrs9939609, 0.25 for C for MC4Rrs17782313, and 0.20 for T for TMEM18rs6548238. For rare vs. common homozygotes, odds ratio for obesity was 3.32 (95% confidence interval = 1.08-10.19) for ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile), 1.42 (1.35-1.52) for FTOrs9939609, 1.18 (1.06-1.30) for MC4Rrs17782313, and 1.28 (1.10-1.50) for TMEM18rs6548238 (common vs. rare). Corresponding odds ratios for diabetes were 1.85 (0.24-14.29), 1.22 (1.07-1.39), 0.96 (0.80-1.16), and 1.61 (1.17-2.22), respectively. After adjustment for BMI, only TMEM18rs6548238 remained associated with diabetes. BMI was increased in rare vs. common homozygotes in FTOrs9939609, MC4Rrs17782313, and TMEM18rs6548238 (common vs. rare) but not in ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile).
Our results suggest that ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) rare vs. common homozygotes are not significantly associated with an increase in BMI measured continuously but may be associated with an increased risk of obesity. Also, TMEM18rs6548238 associated with risk of diabetes after adjustment for BMI. These findings need confirmation in other studies.
PubMed ID
22466342 View in PubMed
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A 4-year, cluster-randomized, controlled childhood obesity prevention study: STOPP.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99038
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
C. Marcus
G. Nyberg
A. Nordenfelt
M. Karpmyr
J. Kowalski
U. Ekelund
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, National Childhood Obesity Centre, Stockholm, Sweden. claude.marcus@ki.se
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Child
Cluster analysis
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Physical Fitness - psychology
Prevalence
Risk Reduction Behavior
School Health Services
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of a school-based intervention programme to reduce the prevalence of overweight in 6 to 10-year-old children. DESIGN: Cluster-randomized, controlled study. SUBJECTS: A total of 3135 boys and girls in grades 1-4 were included in the study. METHODS: Ten schools were selected in Stockholm county area and randomized to intervention (n=5) and control (n=5) schools. Low-fat dairy products and whole-grain bread were promoted and all sweets and sweetened drinks were eliminated in intervention schools. Physical activity (PA) was aimed to increase by 30 min day(-1) during school time and sedentary behaviour restricted during after school care time. PA was measured by accelerometry. Eating habits at home were assessed by parental report. Eating disorders were evaluated by self-report. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight and obesity decreased by 3.2% (from 20.3 to 17.1) in intervention schools compared with an increase of 2.8% (from 16.1 to 18.9) in control schools (P
PubMed ID
19290010 View in PubMed
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6-month CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - a case study from the couple's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165224
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Anders Broström
Peter Johansson
Jan Albers
Jan Wiberg
Eva Svanborg
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. andbr@imv.liu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - adverse effects - psychology
Cost of Illness
Fear
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frustration
Humans
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Obesity, Morbid - complications
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Snoring - etiology - psychology
Social Behavior
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce mortality and morbidity, but low compliance rates are seen.
To explore and describe the experiences of CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe OSAS during a 6-month period from the couple's perspective. METHODS AND THE CASE: A single case study with a phenomenographic approach was employed. Diagnostic procedures of OSAS and initiation of treatment with Auto-CPAP, humidifier and a nasal mask were performed during 4 visits. Conceptions were collected at 4 different occasions during the 6-month period (before, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation) by means of interviews with a 33-year old male patient and his female partner.
Totally 17 different structural aspects were found to fluctuate during the 6-month period in relation to; influence of stressors, social reactions and adaptation to increase compliance.
An increased knowledge about the influence of stressors, the social reactions, and the adaptation can help healthcare personnel to identify and better understand concerns of other patients and spouses during different time phases of the initial 6-month period of CPAP-treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):89-9018396463
PubMed ID
17291832 View in PubMed
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A 6-year experience with the Swedish adjustable gastric band Prospective long-term audit of laparoscopic gastric banding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177378
Source
Surg Endosc. 2005 Jan;19(1):21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
J. Zehetner
F. Holzinger
H. Triaca
Ch Klaiber
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Aarberg Hospital, CH-3270, Aarberg, Switzerland.
Source
Surg Endosc. 2005 Jan;19(1):21-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastroplasty - adverse effects - methods
Humans
Laparoscopy - adverse effects
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid - complications - surgery
Prospective Studies
Prostheses and Implants - adverse effects
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
In morbid obesity conservative therapy often fails to reduce overweight permanently. As a consequence, several bariatric surgical procedures have been developed to achieve permanent excess weight loss. Among these, the laparoscopic restrictive procedures seem to be the least invasive. The aim of this prospective study was to assess and analyze the effects, complications, and outcomes after the implantation of the Swedish adjustable gastric band (SAGB) in long-term follow-up.
All consecutive patients with implantation of a SAGB between August 1996 and August 2002 were prospectively investigated. The placement of the SAGB was done by laparoscopy in all cases. Success was rated by the reduction of body mass index (BMI) excess weight loss (EWL), and reduction of comorbidities. "Nonresponders" to SAGB were defined as
PubMed ID
15549627 View in PubMed
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[10-year trends in body weight in men and women in Novosibirsk (1985-1995)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174900
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
E S Kylbanova
S K Maliutina
N V Nasonova
Iu P Nikitin
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Siberia
Weight Gain
Abstract
To assess 10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity in Novosibirsk population.
The data of three population surveys (a total of 9714 men and women aged 25-64 years) carried out according to WHO MONICA program.
Obesity prevalence among males in 1985-1989 tended to a small rise without changes during subsequent 5 years. In females the prevalence of obesity and overweight decreased in 1985-1994.
10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity were insignificant in men and beneficial in women of Novosibirsk population while the frequency of increased body mass in women remains relatively high.
PubMed ID
15881103 View in PubMed
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11th Annual International Symposium in Obesity: 'Obesity in a modern world: when pleasure meets homeostasis'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150244
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Jun;33 Suppl 2:S1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
D. Richard
P. Boisvert
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Centre de recherche de I'Institut de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada. Denis.Richard@crhl.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Jun;33 Suppl 2:S1-2
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses as topic
Female
Homeostasis
Humans
Male
Obesity - physiopathology - psychology
Philosophy
Quebec
Reward
PubMed ID
19528972 View in PubMed
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The 12th Annual International Symposium in Obesity: Rediscovering brown adipose tissue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140162
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Oct;34 Suppl 1:S1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
D. Richard
P. Boisvert
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada. Denis.Richard@criucpq.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Oct;34 Suppl 1:S1-2
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue, Brown
Canada
Congresses as topic
Humans
Obesity
PubMed ID
20935659 View in PubMed
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A 12 year prospective study of circulatory disease among Danish shift workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82071
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Tüchsen F.
Hannerz H.
Burr H.
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. ft@ami.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies of the risk of heart disease after shift work reached different estimates and review authors disagree about the validity of some of the studies. A cross sectional study showed that shift workers had a higher prevalence of nearly every unfavourable work environment factor investigated. Conflicts at work and low decision latitude were more frequent among shift workers, and all-day walking or standing work and part-time jobs were more often found among female shift workers. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risk of circulatory disease in a prospective follow up of a representative sample of gainfully employed Danes, considering known or suspected confounding factors. METHODS: A cohort of 5517 people who were gainfully employed in 1990 were followed up for all hospital treatments due to circulatory diseases (390-458, ICD-8; I00-I99, ICD-10) from 1991 to 2002 inclusive. A log linear Poisson regression model was applied to control confounding factors and calculate the relative risk for 927 men and women working nights, evenings, or other non-day shifts compared to 4579 day workers. RESULTS: Non-day workers compared to day workers had a relative risk (RR) for all circulatory diseases of 1.31 (95% CI 1.06-1.63). Without control for BMI and smoking, the RR estimate was 1.33 (95% CI 1.07-1.65). For a subgroup of workers with at least three years' seniority, the RR was 1.40 (95% CI 1.09-1.81). The population based aetiological fraction of shift work was estimated to 5%. CONCLUSION: This study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that shift work carries an excess risk of circulatory diseases.
PubMed ID
16735480 View in PubMed
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4434 records – page 1 of 444.