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Dietary sources of energy and nutrients in the contemporary diet of Inuit adults: results from the 2007-08 Inuit Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299381
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1319-1331
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Tiff-Annie Kenny
Xue Feng Hu
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Sonia D Wesche
Hing Man Chan
Author Affiliation
1Department of Biology,University of Ottawa,30 Marie Curie,Ottawa,ON,Canada,K1N 6N5.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1319-1331
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Diet - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nunavut - epidemiology
Nutritive Value - physiology
Abstract
To characterize the major components of the contemporary Inuit diet and identify the primary sources of energy and essential nutrients.
Dietary data were derived from the 24 h recall collected by the Inuit Health Survey (IHS) from 2007 to 2008. The population proportion method was used to determine the percentage contribution of each group. Unique food items/preparations (ninety-three country foods and 1591 market foods) were classified into eight country food groups and forty-one market food groups. Nutrient composition of each food item was obtained from the Canadian Nutrient File.
Thirty-six communities across three Inuit regions of northern Canada.
A representative sample (n 2095) of non-pregnant Inuit adults (=18 years), selected through stratified random sampling.
Despite their modest contribution to total energy intake (6·4-19·6 %, by region) country foods represented a major source of protein (23-52 %), Fe (28-54 %), niacin (24-52 %) and vitamins D (up to 73 %), B6 (18-55 %) and B12 (50-82 %). By contrast, the three most popular energy-yielding market foods (i.e. sweetened beverages, added sugar and bread) collectively contributed approximately 20 % of total energy, while contributing minimally to most micronutrients. A notable exception was the contribution of these foods to Ca (13-21 %) and vitamins E (17-35 %) and C (as much as 50 %). Solid fruits were consumed by less than 25 % of participants while vegetables were reported by 38-59 % of respondents.
Country foods remain a critical dimension of the contemporary Inuit diet.
PubMed ID
29331158 View in PubMed
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Nutritional quality and price of food hampers distributed by a campus food bank: a Canadian experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104051
Source
J Health Popul Nutr. 2014 Jun;32(2):287-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Mahsa Jessri
Arvin Abedi
Alexander Wong
Ghazaleh Eslamian
Source
J Health Popul Nutr. 2014 Jun;32(2):287-300
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Dietary Fats
Energy intake
Food - economics
Food Supply - economics - methods
Fruit
Humans
Meat
Milk
Nutrition Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Nutritive Value - physiology
Recommended Dietary Allowances - economics
Students - statistics & numerical data
Universities
Vegetables
Abstract
Food insecurity is a mounting concern among Canadian post-secondary students. This study was conducted to evaluate the content of food hampers distributed by University of Alberta Campus Food Bank (CFB) and to assess the cost savings to students, using these hampers. Contents of hampers distributed among 1,857 students and their dependants since 2006 were evaluated against Canada's Food Guide (CFG) recommendations and Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). Hampers were aimed at serving university students and one to five members of their households located in Edmonton, Western Canada. One thousand eight hundred fifty-seven clients in Alberta, Canada, were included in the study. Although all hampers provided adequate energy, their fat and animal protein contents were low. Compared to the CFG recommendations, the requirements of milk and alternatives and meat and alternatives were not sufficiently met for clients using > or = 3-person hampers. None of food hampers (i.e. one- to five-person hampers) met the DRI recommendations for vitamin A and zinc. Clients of CFB received Canadian dollar (CN$) 14.88 to 64.3 worth of non-perishable food items in one- to five-person hampers respectively. Hampers provided from the CFB need improvement. Nutrients missing from the food hampers could be provided from fresh fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat products; however, these foods are more expensive than processed food items. The CFB provides a significant amount of savings to its clients even without considering the additional perishable donations that are provided to clients. Interpretation of our data required the assumption that all clients were consuming all of their hampers, which may not always be the case. Clients that do not fully consume their hampers may benefit less from the food bank.
PubMed ID
25076666 View in PubMed
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Nutritive quality and protein production from grain legumes in a boreal climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273412
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2015 Aug 15;95(10):2053-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2015
Author
Clara I Lizarazo
Anna-Maija Lampi
Jingwei Liu
Tuula Sontag-Strohm
Vieno Piironen
Frederick L Stoddard
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2015 Aug 15;95(10):2053-64
Date
Aug-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Climate
Fabaceae - chemistry - physiology
Finland
Nutritive Value - physiology
Plant Proteins - chemistry - metabolism - standards
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Boreal cropping systems are heavily focused on the production of small-grain cereals; to improve their resilience to climate change and to achieve food and feed security, diversification is needed. This study investigated the potential of faba bean, narrow-leafed lupin and lentil as protein crops in southern Finland, where faba bean is traditional but the other two are novel.
Early cultivars of narrow-leafed lupin and lentil matured adequately. Protein concentration in faba bean was, at 32%, higher than the world average of 29%, while those of narrow-leafed lupin and lentil were close to their world averages. Protein yields decreased in the order faba bean > narrow-leafed lupin > lentil. Lipid content of faba bean and lentil was about 1.2% and that of narrow-leafed lupin about 5.5%, and fatty acid composition was largely oleic and linoleic in all three species.
Both lentil and narrow-leafed lupin can be added to the range of feed and food crops produced at high latitudes in Europe. While faba bean produces the greatest protein yield and lysine concentration, the higher sulfur amino acid concentration in lupin, its oil content and its adaptation to acid, sandy soils not suitable for faba bean make it an attractive alternative.
PubMed ID
25242296 View in PubMed
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[THE USE OF RISK INDICES IN PROCEDURES OF VERIFICATION OF BABY FOOD QUALITY CONFORMANCE].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273970
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(3):281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
S A Buymova
A G Bubnov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(3):281-6
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Food Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Food Safety - methods
Foods, Specialized - analysis - standards
Humans
Nutritive Value - physiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
There is considered the possibility of the use of risk indices with regard to their use in certification and validation of conformity assessment and food conformance, including those recommended for children. There were investigated samples of oatmeals, potted meats, liver pate, fruit-vegetable puree. The calculation of risk values was based on original data of quantitative analysis that was performed with the use of thermogravimetric, photometric, titrimetric, and potentiometric methods, as well as methods of gas-liquid chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. On the base of data of the chemical analysis of the ingredients of a set of food products, including assigned for baby nutrition, all the tested samples were shown to meet the requirements for the controlled regulatory standards on control indices of quality. The calculation of average daily doses of the intake of metal compounds (Cu, Zn, Fe, Na, Ca, Mg) consumed by adult and child's organisms through tested food showed that such doses are allowable since they do not exceed maximum daily dose and average daily requirements. However, some samples were referred to the category of high risk food, because the used method of individual's lifetime risk calculation takes into consideration all possible negative effects (carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, embryogenic, etc) of the impact of pollutants on the human body. It is shown that in addition to the sanitary and hygienic criteria of food quality, the risks of such food consumption should be taken into consideration by the Technical Regulations and other normative documentations.
PubMed ID
27266030 View in PubMed
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