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Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147344
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
  1 document  
Author
Alastair B Ross
Asa Johansson
Veronika Vavruch-Nilsson
Sven Hassler
Per Sjölander
Anette Edin-Liljegren
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Alastair.Ross@rdls.nestle.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
372451
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Population Groups
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the nutrient and food intake of Sami still engaged in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle or reindeer-herding Sami [RS]) and Sami not involved in reindeer herding (industrialized lifestyle or non-reindeer-herding Sami [NRS]) with other northern Swedish populations.
Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden.
Data were used from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Sami recruited into this study were divided according to whether they were involved in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle, RS) (66 females, 79 males) or not (NRS) (255 females, 195 males), and compared to non-Sami from the same area taking part in the same study (controls) (499 females, 501 males). Subjects completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and clinical parameters were analysed.
RS had a higher overall intake of energy for both females (P
PubMed ID
19917189 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the Danish food-based dietary guidelines and risk of myocardial infarction: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299380
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1286-1296
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Inge Tetens
Anne Tjønneland
Erik Thorlund Parner
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Author Affiliation
1Section for Epidemiology,Department of Public Health,Aarhus University,Bartholins Allé 2,DK-8000 Aarhus C,Denmark.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1286-1296
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A direct way to evaluate food-based dietary guidelines is to assess if adherence is associated with development of non-communicable diseases. Thus, the objective was to develop an index to assess adherence to the 2013 Danish food-based dietary guidelines and to investigate the association between adherence to the index and risk of myocardial infarction (MI).
Population-based cohort study with recruitment of participants in 1993-1997. Information on dietary intake was collected at baseline using an FFQ and an index ranging from 0 to 6 points was created to assess adherence to the 2013 Danish food-based dietary guidelines. MI cases were identified by record linkage to the Danish National Patient Register and the Causes of Death Register. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of MI.
Greater areas of Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark.
Men and women aged 50-64 years (n 55 021) from the Diet, Cancer and Health study.
A total of 3046 participants were diagnosed with first-time MI during a median follow-up of 16·9 years. A higher Danish Dietary Guidelines Index score was associated with a lower risk of MI. After adjustment for potential confounders, the hazard of MI was 13 % lower among men with a score of 3-
PubMed ID
29331164 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' low-carbohydrate-density diets are related to poorer dietary intakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172239
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Linda S Greene-Finestone
M Karen Campbell
Susan E Evers
Iris A Gutmanis
Author Affiliation
Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Linda_Greene-Finestone@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Child
Cluster analysis
Confidence Intervals
Diet - standards
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Nutritive Value
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
This study was undertaken to assess how low-carbohydrate-density diets below the acceptable macronutrient distribution range relate to food and micronutrient intake and sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. The multistage stratified cluster design in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey was used. There were 5,194 subjects, 12 to 18 years of age, in sampled households. Dietary data were collected via a food frequency questionnaire. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were consumed by 27.6% of males and 24.1% of females. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were related (P
PubMed ID
16256764 View in PubMed
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After-school snack intake among Canadian children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114423
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e448-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jo-Anne Gilbert
Doris Miller
Shannon Olson
Sylvie St-Pierre
Author Affiliation
Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON. jo-anne.gilbert@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e448-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Meals
Nutritive Value
Snacks - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
The article describes the after-school (AS) snacking pattern of young Canadians and its relationship with the amount of energy consumed daily and at dinner.
We analyzed cross-sectional dietary data, measured by 24h recall, from 9,131 children and adolescents aged 4 to 18 years from the Canadian Community Health Survey, cycle 2.2 (2004). We evaluated AS snack intake; i.e., foods consumed Monday to Friday between 3:00 and 6:00 pm, excluding lunch and dinner. We also assessed the consumption frequency of AS snack items, the energy provided by AS snacks and total daily energy intake (TDEI) by age group and sex.
Approximately 63% of respondents consumed AS snacks. AS snacks provided on average 1212[95%CI,1157-1268] kJ (290[95%CI,276-303] kcal), representing 13[95%CI,12-13]% of TDEI. Youth who consumed AS snacks contributing 1-418 kJ (1-99 kcal) reported lower TDEI than those who consumed no snack. Among AS snack consumers, TDEI was higher in groups consuming the highest amount of energy from AS snacks. Fruits were among the most frequently consumed food categories. However, the largest energy contributors were mostly foods that may be energy-dense and nutrient-poor, such as cookies, sugar-sweetened beverages and sweets.
Considering that the majority of children and adolescents consumed AS snacks, that these snacks provided about 13% of their TDEI, and that the majority of the most frequently consumed snacks were generally energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods, the AS time period presents an opportunity to promote healthy eating in order to improve diet quality and potentially influence TDEI among Canadian children and adolescents.
PubMed ID
23618026 View in PubMed
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An Active Lifestyle Reinforces the Effect of a Healthy Diet on Cognitive Function: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296831
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Sep 13; 10(9):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-13-2018
Author
Behnaz Shakersain
Debora Rizzuto
Hui-Xin Wang
Gerd Faxén-Irving
Federica Prinelli
Laura Fratiglioni
Weili Xu
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Widerströmskahuset, plan 10, Tomtebodavägen 18A, 171 65 Solna, Sweden. behnaz.shakersain@ki.se.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Sep 13; 10(9):
Date
Sep-13-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Cognitive Aging
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Healthy aging
Healthy Diet
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritive Value
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The joint effect of diet and leisure activity on cognitive function remains unknown. We aimed to verify the hypothesis that an active lifestyle reinforces the effect of the Nordic Prudent Dietary Pattern (NPDP) on cognitive function. A total of 2223 dementia-free Swedish adults aged =60 with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores =27 were followed for an average of 6 years. MMSE was tested during follow-ups. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaire. The NPDP index was calculated and tertiled (low, moderate, and high adherence). Participation in physical, mental and social activities was trichotomised (low, moderate, and intense). An active lifestyle was defined based on the participation in each activity. Data were analyzed using mixed-effects models. Moderate-to-high adherence to NPDP was associated with a reduced decline in the MMSE score (ß: 0.19, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.14?0.24). This association became stronger when combined with moderate-to-intense physical (ß: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.2?0.45), mental (ß: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.21?0.37), or social (ß: 0.27, 95% CI: 0.19?0.34) activities. An active lifestyle strengthened the effect of NPDP on cognitive function by two times, and further lowered risk of MMSE decline by 30%. Thus, an active lifestyle reinforces the effect of a healthy diet on preserved cognitive function, and further decreases the risk of cognitive decline.
PubMed ID
30217035 View in PubMed
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An examination of income-related disparities in the nutritional quality of food selections among Canadian households from 1986-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167122
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2007 Jan;64(1):186-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Laurie E Ricciuto
Valerie S Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5S 3E2. laurie.ricciuto@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2007 Jan;64(1):186-98
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family
Food Preferences
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Nutritive Value
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Socio-economic disparities in nutrition have been documented in numerous countries, and have been linked to health inequalities. Social and economic policy changes occurring over the last several years have resulted in growing levels of income inequality in many countries. However, the extent to which these temporal changes have affected nutrition disparities is largely unknown. Our research examined income-related disparities in the nutritional quality of food selections among Canadian households from 1986 to 2001. Data from the 1986, 1992, 1996 and 2001 Family Food Expenditure surveys were pooled together (n=35048). The relationships between household income and the nutritional quality of food purchases (considering nutrients both as absolute amounts and adjusted for energy, and total energy density) were estimated using general linear models, including tests of significance for differences across the survey years. Results revealed significant positive relationships between income and most nutrients, which persisted over time, and for some nutrients grew stronger. One exception was folate, where the positive relationship between income and folate (independent of energy) was no longer apparent in 2001; this could be attributed to the mandatory fortification of some cereal grain products with folic acid, which came into effect in 1998, resulting in greater availability of folate from grain products. There was also a significant negative relationship between income and total energy density (ratio of food energy to food weight), which persisted across the survey years. At a time of growing income inequality and worsening problems of poverty, food policy makers need to pay attention to the potential for policy interventions to exacerbate or improve nutrition disparities.
PubMed ID
17030372 View in PubMed
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[Antimutagenic and antioxidant features of confectionery products containing the powder from the leaves of Hippophae rhamnoides L.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299450
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2018; 87(1):92-97
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
G Ts Tsybikova
Ya G Razuvaeva
A A Toropova
S M Nikolaev
Author Affiliation
East Siberia State University of Technology and Management, Ulan-Ude.
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2018; 87(1):92-97
Date
2018
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Antimutagenic Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Antioxidants - chemistry - pharmacology
Candy - analysis
Catalase - blood
Food analysis
Hippophae - chemistry
Nutritive Value
Plant Leaves - chemistry
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Superoxide Dismutase - blood
Abstract
The aim of the work was to determine the possibility of using the powder from the leaves of Hippophae rhamnoides L. for enriching flour confectionery and to evaluate the antimutagenic and antioxidant activity of the product. The experiment was carried out on 24 white Wistar rats with initial body weight (b.w.) 180-200 g. The animals of the experimental group (n=8) received confection containing sea buckthorn powder at a rate of 20 mg per 100 g b.w. for 14 days on the background of a standard vivarium diet. The animals of the control and intact groups received confection containing no bioactive supplement at the same dose. Antimutagenic and antioxidant effects were estimated in a day after a single injection of cyclophosphamide at a dose of 20 mg/kg b.w. The number of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of white rats was counted and the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), the level of reduced glutathione and the concentration of TBA-active products in blood were evaluated. The intake of the confectionery containing the powdered H. rhamnoides leaves resulted in the 45% decrease of the number of damaged cells, 50% decrease of the proportion of cells with multiple chromosome breaks and 52% decrease of the number of achromatic gaps as compared to animals of the control group (n=8). The cake intake increased the activity of catalase (by 52%) and SOD (by 33%) and glutathione content (by 26%) in blood.
PubMed ID
30592847 View in PubMed
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The antioxidant level of Alaska's wild berries: high, higher and highest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284324
Source
Pages 796-802 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):796-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
concentration, products made from berries are high sources of antioxidants. Keywords: antioxidants; berries; nutritional value; Alaska; phytochemical CQ\C-~ION C onsumption of fruits and vegetables has been correlated to robust improvement in brain health, cancer prevention and heart health. The US
  1 document  
Author
Dinstel RR
Cascio J
Koukel S
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA.
Source
Pages 796-802 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):796-802
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Antioxidants/analysis
Blueberry Plants/chemistry
Food Handling
Fruit/chemistry
Nutritive Value
Vaccinium vitis-idaea/chemistry
Viburnum/chemistry
Abstract
BACKGROUND:In the last few years, antioxidants have become the stars of the nutritional world. Antioxidants are important in terms of their ability to protect against oxidative cell damage that can lead to conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer and heart disease--conditions also linked with chronic inflammation. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Alaska's wild berries may have the potential to help prevent these diseases. OBJECTIVE: To discover the antioxidant levels of Alaska wild berries and the ways these antioxidant levels translate when preservation methods are applied to the berry. DESIGN: This research centered on both the raw berries and products made from the berries. In the first year, a variety of wild berries were tested to discover their oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) in the raw berries. The second level of the research project processed 4 different berries--blueberries, lingonberries, salmonberries, highbush cranberries--into 8 or 9 products made from these berries. The products were tested for both ORAC as well as specific antioxidants. RESULTS: The Alaska wild berries collected and tested in the first experiment ranged from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC value than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states. For instance, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. This is also higher than lower 48 wild blueberries, which had a score of 61. All of the Alaskan berries tested have a level of antioxidant considered nutritionally valuable, ranging from 19 for watermelon berries to 206 for lingonberries on the ORAC scale. With the processed products made from 4 Alaska wild berries, one of the unexpected outcomes of the research was that the berries continued to have levels of antioxidants considered high, despite the effects of commonly used heat-processing techniques. When berries were dehydrated, per gram ORAC values increased. CONCLUSION: Alaska wild berries have extraordinarily high antioxidant levels. Though cooking lowered the antioxidant level, and adding ingredients such as sugar diluted the antioxidant concentration, products made from berries are high sources of antioxidants.
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Arctic and Antarctic exploration including the contributions of physicians and effects of disease in the polar regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4838
Source
Neurosurgery. 2000 May;46(5):1269
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
H W Schroeder
Source
Neurosurgery. 2000 May;46(5):1269
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Ascorbic Acid - analysis
Cold Climate
Humans
Nutritive Value
Physician's Role
Survival
Notes
Comment On: Neurosurgery. 1999 May;44(5):925-39; discussion 939-4010232525
PubMed ID
10807267 View in PubMed
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Are Food Advertisements Promoting More Unhealthy Foods and Beverages over Time? Evidence from Three Swedish Food Magazines, 1995-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279943
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2017 Jan-Feb;56(1):45-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Andreas Håkansson
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2017 Jan-Feb;56(1):45-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - trends
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Bread - adverse effects - economics
Consumer Behavior - economics
Dairy Products - adverse effects - economics
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - economics - ethnology
Food - adverse effects - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Fruit and Vegetable Juices - adverse effects - economics
Health Promotion - economics - trends
Health Transition
Healthy Diet - economics - trends
Humans
Nutritive Value
Periodicals as Topic - economics
Sweden
Abstract
Unhealthy food in advertising has been suggested as a mediator for the increase in diet-related illness. This study quantitatively investigates changes in food advertising between 1995 and 2014 in terms of food categories promoted, macronutrient content, and percentage of foods classified as heathy or unhealthy from a sample of 7,199 ads from three Swedish food magazines. With the exception of increased alcoholic beverage and decreased carbohydrate-rich-food promotion, no monotonic trends of increasingly unhealthy food advertisement are found. From these findings, it is argued that food magazine advertising is not a mediator of the adverse dietary trend.
PubMed ID
27880047 View in PubMed
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208 records – page 1 of 21.