Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

[Diet of six-year-old Icelandic children - National dietary survey 2011-2012].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117006
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Jan;99(1):17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Hafdis Helgadottir
Birna Thorisdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Iceland. ingigun@hi.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Jan;99(1):17-23
Date
Jan-2013
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child Behavior
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats
Dietary Fiber
Dietary Sucrose
Energy intake
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Iceland
Minerals
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Seafood
Vegetables
Vitamins
Abstract
Knowledge of dietary habits makes the basis for public nutrition policy. The aim of this study was to assess dietary intake of Icelandic six-year-olds.
Subjects were randomly selected six-year-old children (n=162). Dietary intake was assessed by three-day-weighed food records. Food and nutrient intake was compared with the Icelandic food based dietary guidelines (FBDG) and recommended intake of vitamins and minerals.
Fruit and vegetable intake was on average 275±164 g/d, and less than 20% of the subjects consumed =400 g/day. Fish and cod liver oil intake was in line with the FBDG among approximately 25% of subjects. Most subjects (87%) consumed at least two portions of dairy products daily. Food with relatively low nutrient density (cakes, cookies, sugar sweetened drinks, sweets and ice-cream) provided up to 25% of total energy intake. The contribution of saturated fatty acids to total energy intake was 14.1%. Less than 20% of the children consumed dietary fibers in line with recommendations, and for saturated fat and salt only 5% consumed less than the recommended upper limits. Average intake of most vitamins and minerals, apart from vitamin-D, was higher than the recommended intake.
Although the vitamin and mineral density of the diet seems adequate, with the exception of vitamin-D, the contribution of low energy density food to total energy intake is high. Intake of vegetables, fruits, fish and cod liver oil is not in line with public recommendations. Strategies aiming at improving diet of young children are needed.
PubMed ID
23341402 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Energy and protein intake of patients at the Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, Landspítali - the National University Hospital of Iceland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115621
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Feb;99(2):71-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Dagny �sp Vilhjálmsdottir
Harpa Hrund Hinriksdóttir
Frida Run Pórdardottir
Inga Pórsdottir
Ingibjörg Gunnarsdtótir
Author Affiliation
Rannsóknastofu í Nseringarfrnedi vid Háskóla og Landspítala, Spítala.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Feb;99(2):71-5
Date
Feb-2013
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - standards
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage - standards
Energy intake
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Guideline Adherence
Hospital Departments - standards
Hospitals, University - standards
Humans
Iceland
Inpatients
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Nutritional Support
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Protein-Energy Malnutrition - etiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Thoracic Surgical Procedures - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim was to estimate energy and protein intake of patients at the Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, Landspítali the National University Hospital of Iceland. Another aim was also to assess their nutritional status.
The energy and protein content of meals served by the hospital's kitchen is known. Starting at least 48 hours after surgery, all left over food and drinks were weighed and recorded for three consecutive days. Energy and protein requirements were estimated according to clinical guidelines for hospital nutrition at Landspítali (25-30 kcal/kg/day and 1.2-1.5 g/kg/day, respectively). Nutritional status was estimated using a validated seven question screening sheet.
Results are presented for 61 patients. The average energy intake was 19±5.8 kcal/kg/day. Protein intake was on average 0.9±0.3 g/kg/day. Most patients (>80%) had an energy and protein intake below the lower limit of estimated energy and protein needs, even on the fifth day after sugery. According to the nutritional assessment 14 patients (23%) were defined as either malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. This group was closer than the well-nourished group to meeting their estimated energy- and protein needs. The use of nutrition drinks was more common among malnourished patients and those at risk of malnutrition than the well-nourished patients.
The results suggest that the energy and protein intake of patients is below estimated requirements, even on the fifth day after surgery. Attention must be paid to malnutrition and nutrition in general in the hospital wards.
Notes
Comment In: Laeknabladid. 2013 Feb;99(2):6923486678
PubMed ID
23486676 View in PubMed
Less detail