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[Dietary intake of different forms of iron and other factors of anemia epidemiology in women of childbearing age in S. Petersburg].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205546
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1998;(1):21-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
A N Martinchik
A I Feoktistova
A K Baturin
E V Peskova
B. Chalmers
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1998;(1):21-5
Date
1998
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects
Adult
Anemia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Iron, Dietary - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Actual nutritional status and dietary intake of different iron forms of the women in Sankt-Peterburg were investigated. The concentration of blood hemoglobin was studied. Signs of deficiency of nutrition of the investigated women were not found both by analysis of foodstuffs and energy intake and by anthropometric estimation of nutritional status.
PubMed ID
9606862 View in PubMed
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[Monitoring food consumption and nutritional status of Moscow schoolchildren in 1992-1994. 2. Anthropometric evaluation of nutritional status, effect of social factors on the character and status of nutrition].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210066
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1997;(1):3-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
A N Martinchik
A K Baturin
A I Feoktistova
T A Zemlianskaia
G A Azizbekian
V S Baeva
T I Larina
E V Peskova
L S Trofimenko
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1997;(1):3-9
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Body Height - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Eating - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Students
Abstract
In this part of the study the nutritional status of Moscow's schoolchildren was assessed by height and weight. The anthropometric data were compared with the CDC/WHO international growth references standards by ANTHRO version 1.01 software. The prevalence of low weight-for-age (Z-score
PubMed ID
9214141 View in PubMed
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[Monitoring of dietary intake and nutritional status of Moscow's school children, 1992-1994. 1. Methodology of the study. Energy and nutrient intakes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213087
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1996;(6):12-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A N Martinchik
A K Baturin
E. Khel'sing
Ia Charzhevska
G I Bondarev
A N Feoktistova
T A Zemlianskaia
T A Azizbekian
V S Baeva
I N Piatnitskaia
T I Larina
E V Peskova
M I Lyndina
T G Zaburkina
L S Trofimenko
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1996;(6):12-8
Date
1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Minerals - administration & dosage
Moscow
Nutritional Status
Sex Factors
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Surveys of dietary intakes and nutritional status of schoolchildren aged 10 and 15 years in Moscow were made during a period of rapid economic transformation, 1992-1994. It was part of multicentre study of schoolchildren dietary intake evaluation sponsored by WHO/UNICEF. Information on food intake was collected using two 24-hour recall interviews. The design of study was carefully elaborated by international group of nutritional epidemiologists. There was a slight change in food pattern with age, and some differences between boys and girls of 15 years old. Nutrient intakes in the groups studied did not change significantly during the period of study. Protein contributed about 12% and fat 29-32% of the dietary energy, and total energy intake was overall on a satisfactory level. 70% of the subjects had low intake levels of vitamin B2 and calcium compared with the chosen reference values. Milk and dairy products, fruits, juices and vegetables were consumed in small quantities and relatively infrequently. The consumption of bread and bread products, porridge, confectionery, meat and meat products were consumed more frequently and in larger quantities.
PubMed ID
9123914 View in PubMed
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[Probability analysis of the risk of inadequate intake of nutrients in Moscow schoolchildren].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209781
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1997;(5):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
A N Martinchik
A K Baturin
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1997;(5):26-9
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Humans
Moscow
Nutritional Status
Probability
Protein Deficiency
Riboflavin deficiency
Risk assessment
Students
Thiamine deficiency
Abstract
The probability approach analysis was carried out for assessment of risk of inadequate intake of vitamin B1, B2 and protein in Moscow's school; children in 1992-1994. Inadequate protein, vitamin B1 and B2 intakes were found in 11%, 8% and 26% of schoolchildren respectively. It was shown that probability approach calculations give lower percentage of inadequate intake all nutrients than simple comparison of intake values with recommended allowances.
PubMed ID
9460848 View in PubMed
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Source
Vopr Pitan. 2011;80(6):59-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
V S Baeva
A N Martinchik
O N Makurina
A K Baturin
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2011;80(6):59-61
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
Food Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Food Habits
Humans
Nutritional Status
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The article gives information about the soups traditionally used by the population of Russia. A classification of soups, their nutrients and energy content, as well as the contribution of soups to daily nutrient consumption of the population are presented. Taking into account results of epidemiological researches of dietary the most popular types of first lunch dishes (soups) in the population of Russia were found out.
PubMed ID
22379866 View in PubMed
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