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519 records – page 1 of 52.

25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in maternal and cord blood at delivery and in maternal blood during lactation in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240391
Source
Hum Nutr Clin Nutr. 1984 Jul;38(4):261-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1984
Author
C. Lamberg-Allardt
M. Larjosto
E. Schultz
Source
Hum Nutr Clin Nutr. 1984 Jul;38(4):261-8
Date
Jul-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcifediol - blood
Calcium - blood
Cholecalciferol - administration & dosage
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lactation
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Nutritional Requirements
Pregnancy
Seasons
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
The 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (25-OHD) in maternal and cord blood of 192 mothers was determined at delivery from June to the end of November. Ninety-nine mothers had received a daily supplementation of 12.5 micrograms of vitamin D during pregnancy and this group had a significantly higher 25-OHD concentration both in maternal and in cord blood than in the corresponding non-supplemented group. A daily supplement of 2.5 micrograms of vitamin D was given to 63 of the mothers during lactation. Of these mothers 44 were still lactating after 6 months. The dietary vitamin D intake of 31 mothers was calculated. We found a significant correlation between the maternal serum 25-OHD concentration 16-18 weeks after delivery and the total vitamin D intake. The intake (5.5 micrograms/d, including supplementation) was lower than that recommended for lactating mothers which is 10 micrograms/d (Food and Nutrition Board, 1980).
PubMed ID
6088438 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal / subsistence whaling (with special reference to the Alaska and Greenland fisheries).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295212
Source
Reports of the International Whaling Commission. Special issue 4. 86 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1982
much factual information as possible about the nutritional requirements of the aboriginal people on the North Slope of Alaska. Information on eating patterns is also useful as is information on the likes and dislikes of the people. Information giving: (1) percentage of the diet fulfilled by whale
  1 document  
Source
Reports of the International Whaling Commission. Special issue 4. 86 p.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3179731
Keywords
Bowhead whales
Aleuts
Eskimos
Inuits
Subsistence hunting
Whaling
Nutritional Requirements
Acculturation
Documents

RS464_SI04-AboriginalSub-1982.pdf

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Adequacy of food rations in soldiers during an arctic exercise measured by doubly labeled water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4898
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1993 Oct;75(4):1790-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
P J Jones
I. Jacobs
A. Morris
M B Ducharme
Author Affiliation
Division of Human Nutrition, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1993 Oct;75(4):1790-7
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Body Composition - physiology
Body Water - physiology
Electric Impedance
Energy Intake - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exercise - physiology
Food
Humans
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status - physiology
Oxygen Radioisotopes - diagnostic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
To investigate the adequacy of food rations to supply energy needs in cold-temperature environments, caloric expenditure and intake and body composition changes were measured in a group of infantrymen during a 10-day field exercise in the Canadian Arctic. Energy expenditure was measured by the doubly labeled water method (n = 10), and caloric intake was measured by complete food intake records (n = 20). Body composition was determined by isotope dilution (n = 10) and bioelectrical impedence analysis (n = 20) on days 0 and 10. Baseline isotopic enrichment shifts due to geographical relocation were also monitored (n = 5). Mean body weight decreased 0.63 +/- 0.83 (SD) kg over the study period (P
PubMed ID
8282633 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 intakes from foods among Newfoundland and Labrador adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113239
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jennifer Colbourne
Natasha Baker
Peter Wang
Lin Liu
Christina Tucker
Barbara Roebothan
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Niacin - administration & dosage - blood
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Recommended dietary allowances
Risk factors
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Adequacy of intake for niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 from food was estimated in an adult population in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Also considered was whether study findings support current Canadian food fortification policies.
Four hundred randomly selected adult NL residents were surveyed by telephone. Secondary analysis was performed on two 24-hour food recalls for each participant. Mean daily intakes of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 were estimated from foods only and compared by sex/age subgroup. Adequacy of intakes was estimated. Contributions of folate by ready-to-eat cereal and bread products were also estimated.
Intakes of all three nutrients were higher in men. In comparison with recommendations, daily niacin intakes were as follows: excessive for 21.9% of all participants (and for 56.8% of men aged 28 to 54), within the recommended range for 73.6%, and less than adequate for 4.5%. In comparison with recommendations, daily folate intakes were as follows: within the recommended range for 18.1% of participants and less than adequate for 81.9%. In comparison with recommendations, daily vitamin B12 intakes were less than adequate for 36.3% of participants.
More than 20% of those surveyed were consuming, from food alone, niacin at levels above the maximum recommended. Food fortification policies pertaining to niacin should be revisited. In addition, despite fortification, NL adults may be consuming inadequate amounts of folate from foods.
PubMed ID
23750977 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of nutritional intake in a Canadian population of patients with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161617
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Elaheh Aghdassi
Barbara E Wendland
Melanie Stapleton
Maitreyi Raman
Johane P Allard
Author Affiliation
The University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Canada
Crohn Disease - diet therapy - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Dietary Supplements
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Minerals - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Severity of Illness Index
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Crohn's disease is frequently associated with nutritional deficiencies, often a result of disease activity and poor oral intake. This study investigated the adequacy of dietary intake, based on the Canadian Dietary Reference Intake, in ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease and a normal body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)). This was a cross-sectional study of 74 patients with mean age of 35.7+/-1.4 years and BMI of 23.05+/-0.45. All patients completed a 7-day food record and a diary for the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. Mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index was 138.99+/-11.38. Energy and protein intakes were within the recommended levels of intake, but total carbohydrates, fat, and saturated fat intake exceeded the recommended levels of
PubMed ID
17761234 View in PubMed
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[Adequacy of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools of northern Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143615
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joel Monárrez-Espino
Graciela Ivette Béjar-Lío
Guillermo Vázquez-Mendoza
Author Affiliation
Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Clínica, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Chihuahua, México.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Fats - analysis
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Menu Planning
Mexico
Micronutrients - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Residential Facilities
Schools
Abstract
To assess the adequacy and variability of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools.
Records of food and drinks served for meals, weighed daily, were obtained from Monday through Friday for 10 consecutive weeks in two selected boarding schools. Nutrient intake for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays was calculated and analyzed for weeks 3, 5 and 7.
The number of food items used per week ranged from 33 to 46. The most frequently utilized items were cooking oil, fortified corn tortilla, milk, onion, sugar and beans. Total energy served per day fluctuated between 1309 and 2919 Kcal; proteins comprised 10.5 to 21.2% (45 to 127 g/day), carbohydrates 40.7 to 61.9% (145 to 433 g/day), and lipids 22.5 to 48.1% (45 to 125 g/day) of the total. Daily micronutrient content ranges were: iron 15-33 mg, calcium 686-1795 mg, zinc 8-19 mg, vitamin A 118-756 mcg, vitamin B(9) 42-212 mcg, and vitamin B(12) 0.8-5 mcg.
There was significant daily variability in the diet, which was hypercaloric due to the high lipid content, and yet insufficient in vitamins B(9), B(12) and A.
PubMed ID
20464250 View in PubMed
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Adjustment of iron intake for dietary enhancers and inhibitors in population studies: bioavailable iron in rural and urban residing Russian women and children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207882
Source
J Nutr. 1997 Aug;127(8):1456-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
M. Tseng
H. Chakraborty
D T Robinson
M. Mendez
L. Kohlmeier
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
Source
J Nutr. 1997 Aug;127(8):1456-68
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biological Availability
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Diet
Female
Heme - metabolism
Humans
Infant
Intestinal Absorption
Iron, Dietary - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Rural Population
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
Although determining iron intakes is essential in assessing adequacy of iron in the diet, estimating iron availability may be more useful for evaluating whether iron requirements are met. Our objectives were to describe the dietary information, analytical steps, and computer algorithms needed for iron bioavailability adjustments and to demonstrate the effects of various dietary factors on calculated iron absorption. Our study was based on 9890 women and children participating in the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey. Between August 1992 and February 1993, two 24-h recalls were collected from each participant, and total, heme and nonheme iron intakes were calculated. Nonheme iron availability was adjusted for meat, fish and poultry and vitamin C consumed in the same meal and then further adjusted for tea and phytates. We found mean total iron intakes to be comparable to those of women of reproductive age in the United States and lower than those of United States children. When these intakes were adjusted for enhancers and inhibitors of absorption, the iron bioavailability in these vulnerable Russian groups was extremely low. Mean bioavailable iron as well as the 25th-75th percentile ranges of intake were below the bottom of the range of requirements, indicating that iron adequacy in this population may be considerably less than expected based on total iron intakes alone. Furthermore, rural and urban food availability had a significant effect on iron bioavailability. Future research on dietary iron adequacy should be based on estimates of available iron by collecting meal-level dietary data and using detailed information on mixed dishes and phytates.
PubMed ID
9237938 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Sep 1;129(5):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1983

Adolescent nutrition: 5. Pregnancy and diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241546
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Oct 1;129(7):691-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1983
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Oct 1;129(7):691-2
Date
Oct-1-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Diet
Female
Humans
Nutritional Requirements
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Prenatal Care
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1972 Sep;25(9):916-255054218
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1972 Dec;40(6):773-854564722
Cites: J Nutr. 1973 May;103(5):772-854710089
Cites: Pediatrics. 1983 Apr;71(4):489-936835732
Cites: Clin Perinatol. 1975 Sep;2(2):243-541102222
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1978 Aug 17;299(7):317-23683264
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Sep 15;125(6):567-767284936
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1975 Jun;66(6):588-921097488
PubMed ID
6616377 View in PubMed
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519 records – page 1 of 52.