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Abstracts from the annual general meeting of the Canadian Society for Clinical Nutrition. Nutrition in health and disease: the state of the nation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189496
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Jun;16(6):407-14
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Jun-2002
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Jun;16(6):407-14
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Canada
Health status
Humans
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
PubMed ID
12096305 View in PubMed
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[Actual nutrition and vitamin status of school children in the Orla region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193539
Source
Gig Sanit. 2001 May-Jun;(3):54-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
G G Ladnova
A V Istomin
A V Nikolaev
Source
Gig Sanit. 2001 May-Jun;(3):54-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Age Factors
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Rural Population
Russia
Sex Factors
Urban Population
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
The actual nutrition and vitamin provision in 14-17-year-old schoolchildren in Oryol and the Oryol Region were studied within the framework of the working programme. Sanitary recommendations for vitamin prophylaxis were developed. Evidence is provided for the biomedical efficiency of vitamin prophylaxis.
PubMed ID
11519465 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of nutritional intake in a Canadian population of patients with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161617
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Elaheh Aghdassi
Barbara E Wendland
Melanie Stapleton
Maitreyi Raman
Johane P Allard
Author Affiliation
The University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Canada
Crohn Disease - diet therapy - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Dietary Supplements
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Minerals - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Severity of Illness Index
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Crohn's disease is frequently associated with nutritional deficiencies, often a result of disease activity and poor oral intake. This study investigated the adequacy of dietary intake, based on the Canadian Dietary Reference Intake, in ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease and a normal body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)). This was a cross-sectional study of 74 patients with mean age of 35.7+/-1.4 years and BMI of 23.05+/-0.45. All patients completed a 7-day food record and a diary for the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. Mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index was 138.99+/-11.38. Energy and protein intakes were within the recommended levels of intake, but total carbohydrates, fat, and saturated fat intake exceeded the recommended levels of
PubMed ID
17761234 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the New Nordic Diet during pregnancy and subsequent maternal weight development: a study conducted in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299175
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elisabet R Hillesund
Andrew K Wills
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Elling Bere
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition,University of Agder,PO Box 422,4604 Kristiansand,Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child
Diet
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight
Pregnancy
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
The rising prevalence of overweight and obesity is a worldwide public health challenge. Pregnancy and beyond is a potentially important window for future weight gain in women. We investigated associations between maternal adherence to the New Nordic diet (NND) during pregnancy and maternal BMI trajectories from delivery to 8 years post delivery. Data are from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. Pregnant women from all of Norway were recruited between 1999 and 2008, and 55 056 are included in the present analysis. A previously constructed diet score, NND, was used to assess adherence to the diet. The score favours intake of Nordic fruits, root vegetables, cabbages, potatoes, oatmeal porridge, whole grains, wild fish, game, berries, milk and water. Linear spline multi-level models were used to estimate the association. We found that women with higher adherence to the NND pattern during pregnancy had on average lower post-partum BMI trajectories and slightly less weight gain up to 8 years post delivery compared with the lower NND adherers. These associations remained after adjustment for physical activity, education, maternal age, smoking and parity (mean diff at delivery (high v. low adherers): -0·3 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·4, -0·2; mean diff at 8 years: -0·5 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·6, -0·4), and were not explained by differences in energy intake or by exclusive breast-feeding duration. Similar patterns of associations were seen with trajectories of overweight/obesity as the outcome. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the NND may have beneficial properties to long-term weight regulation among women post-partum.
PubMed ID
29770760 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations as a measure of a healthy diet and upper respiratory tract infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140653
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 May;14(5):860-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Elinor Fondell
Sara E Christensen
Olle Bälter
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels vag 12a, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Elinor.Fondell@ki.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 May;14(5):860-9
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The Nordic countries have published joint dietary recommendations, the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR), since 1980. We evaluated adherence to the NNR as a measure of a healthy diet and its potential association with self-reported upper respiratory tract infection (URTI).
A prospective, population-based study with a follow-up period of 4 months. Dietary intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative FFQ with ninety-six items, along with other lifestyle factors, at baseline. URTI was assessed every three weeks. A Poisson regression model was used to control for age, sex and other confounding factors.
A middle-sized county in northern Sweden.
Swedish men and women (n 1509) aged 20-60 years.
The NNR include recommendations on macronutrient proportions, physical activity and intake of micronutrients, sodium, fibre and alcohol. We found that overall adherence to the NNR was moderately good. In addition, we found that high adherence to the NNR (>5·5 adherence points) was not associated with a lower risk of URTI (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0·89, 95% CI 0·73, 1·08) compared with low adherence (
PubMed ID
20854722 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Sep 1;129(5):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1983

Adolescents' low-carbohydrate-density diets are related to poorer dietary intakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172239
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Linda S Greene-Finestone
M Karen Campbell
Susan E Evers
Iris A Gutmanis
Author Affiliation
Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Linda_Greene-Finestone@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Child
Cluster analysis
Confidence Intervals
Diet - standards
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Nutritive Value
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
This study was undertaken to assess how low-carbohydrate-density diets below the acceptable macronutrient distribution range relate to food and micronutrient intake and sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. The multistage stratified cluster design in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey was used. There were 5,194 subjects, 12 to 18 years of age, in sampled households. Dietary data were collected via a food frequency questionnaire. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were consumed by 27.6% of males and 24.1% of females. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were related (P
PubMed ID
16256764 View in PubMed
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Aetiology of severe demarcated enamel opacities--an evaluation based on prospective medical and social data from 17,000 children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101274
Source
Swed Dent J. 2011;35(2):57-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Tobias G Fagrell
Johnny Ludvigsson
Christer Ullbro
Sven-Ake Lundin
Göran Koch
Author Affiliation
Paediatric Dentistry, Special Dental Services, Sahlgrenska University Hospital Mölndal, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 2011;35(2):57-67
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dental Enamel - drug effects - pathology
Dental Enamel Hypoplasia - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Infant
Molar - pathology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
During the 1970s dentists reported an increasing prevalence of a "new" type of enamel disturbance.The disturbance was very specific, with areas of demarcated hypomineralised enamel, and was mostly found in permanent first molars and incisors. Several studies have tried to reveal the aetiology behind the enamel disturbance but sofar no clear factors correlated have been found. The aim of the present study was to evaluate aetiological factors to severe demarcated opacities (SDO) in first permanent molars in a large cohort of children enrolled in the "All Babies in Southeast Sweden" (ABIS) project. ABIS is a prospective study of all children in five Swedish counties born between Oct 1, 1997 and Oct 1, 1999, in all about 17,000 children.They have been followed from birth with recording of a large number of factors on nutrition, diseases, medication, infections, social situation etc. With help from 89 Public Dental Service clinics in the same area preliminary examinations of the children, born between Oct 1,1997 and Oct 1,1999, reported 595 children with severe demarcated opacities (SDO) in first molars.These children and a randomly selected age matched group of 1,200 children were further invited to be examined by specialists in paediatric dentistry. At these examinations 224 severe cases were identified as well as 253 children completely without enamel disturbances among children registered in ABIS.These two groups were analysed according to any correlation between SDO and variables in the ABIS databank. The analyses showed no association between SDO and pre-, peri-, and neonatal data. However, we found a positive association between SDO and breastfeeding for more than 6 months (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.2), late introduction of gruel (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-2.9), and late introduction of infant formula (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.9). A combination of these three variables increased the risk to develop SDO by more than five times (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.6-15.7). No significant associations were found to other environmental, developmental, or medical factors. We conclude that nutritional conditions during first 6 months of life may influence the risk to develop severe demarcated opacities in first permanent molars.
PubMed ID
21827015 View in PubMed
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The affordability of a nutritious diet for households on welfare in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190784
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Jan-Feb;93(1):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nicholas Vozoris
Barbara Davis
Valerie Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3E2.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Jan-Feb;93(1):36-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Diet - economics
Family Characteristics
Financing, Personal
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Ontario
Poverty
Social Welfare - economics
Urban Population
Abstract
This study assesses the affordability of a nutritious diet for households in Toronto that are supported by welfare.
For three hypothetical households, welfare incomes were compared to the monthly costs for food, shelter, and other essential expenditures in Toronto.
If households lived in market rental accommodation, average monthly incomes were insufficient to cover expenses for the single-person household and two-parent family, and barely adequate for the single-parent family considered in this study. However, the single-parent family's actual income fell below expenses for six months of the year. For households with children, the relative inadequacy of welfare increased as children grew older. Living in rent-geared-to-income housing afforded substantial financial advantage, but the welfare income of single-person households was still insufficient to meet basic needs.
These findings indicate discrepancies between welfare incomes and costs of basic needs, which may explain the vulnerability of welfare recipients to food insecurity.
PubMed ID
11925698 View in PubMed
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[Age-related dynamics of the prevalence of ischemic heart disease and arterial hypertension and the mean level of basic risk factors in men 20 to 69 related to the nature of their nutrition].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239469
Source
Ter Arkh. 1985;57(1):17-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
N G Khaltaev
G S Zhukovskii
E D Khaltaeva
F A Aidu
V A Bulin
Source
Ter Arkh. 1985;57(1):17-21
Date
1985
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Diet
Energy intake
Humans
Hypertension - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Risk
Urban Population
Abstract
Analysis of the data derived in the course of examination of men aged 20 to 69 years demonstrates a distinct rise of the prevalence of CHD and AH with age. The level of the total cholesterol also increases with advancing age, reaching a maximum at 40 to 49 years as does the level of Tg (maximal at 50 to 59 years). The body weight also shows a linear increase. Emphasis should be placed on a high alpha-cholesterol content in persons aged 30 to 39 years. Analysis of the nutrition pattern of the male population aged 20 to 69 years revealed an atherogenic nature of nutrition marked by a high quota of fat, saturated fatty acids, low ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids, and high cholesterol consumption with food. The highest consumption of energy sources and animal products was noted in persons aged 30 to 39 years. The same age demonstrated the lowest consumption of products of vegetable origin. Persons aged 50 to 59 years showed a reduction in consumption of protein of animal origin and essential polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as an increase in consumption of readily available sugars, which may lead to the development of obesity and hypertriglyceridemia and therefore to a higher risk of CHD development.
PubMed ID
3983835 View in PubMed
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770 records – page 1 of 77.