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31 records – page 1 of 4.

[Milk in our diet: pro and con. Alternative prophylactic measures].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210150
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1997;75(2):13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997

[Consumption of milk among pregnant women and its significance for the intake of calcium and fats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62196
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Jul 29;153(31):2178-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-29-1991
Author
P M Rudnicki
A. Frølich
U I Larsen
Author Affiliation
Hvidovre Hospital, København, gynaekologisk obstetrisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Jul 29;153(31):2178-80
Date
Jul-29-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Denmark
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Milk
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Pregnancy
Abstract
Out of a total of 158 pregnant women, 55 accepted participation in a dietary investigation for seven days with the object of assessing the consumption of milk by pregnant women and the significance of this for the intake of energy-providing dietary constituents and certain minerals. The diet in pregnant women contained more fat (43.2%) and the relationship between polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids (P/S-relationship) (0.25) was less than that recommended. The daily dietary content of fibre of 20.7 g/day was lower than the recommended intake. Calcium, phosphate and magnesium intakes constituted 180%, 131% and 64% respectively, of the recommended daily intake. The average intake of milk (buttermilk, skim milk, low fat milk and whole milk) was 482 g/day. The calcium content of the milk constituted, on an average, one third of the total calcium intake. The content of fat and saturated fatty acids in the milk constituted 7% and 10%, respectively, of the total intake. Four of the pregnant women had a daily calcium consumption of less than the recommended intake (1,000 mg/day). The same women had the lowest consumption of milk and energy in the group investigated. The results suggest that the dietary consumption is adequate to cover the calcium requirements. Extra calcium supplements should only be recommended for pregnant women with limited consumption of milk and other milk products. Pregnant women should be advised to take increased quantities of magnesium and to reduce the fat intake.
PubMed ID
1866831 View in PubMed
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Natural and economic events influencing arctic food consumption data: per capita results in northernmost Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5041
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1973 Jan;26(1):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1973

Survey of current vitamin D food fortification practices in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119420
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2013 Jul;136:211-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Mona S Calvo
Susan J Whiting
Author Affiliation
Office of Applied Research and Safety Assessment, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services, 8301 Muirkirk Road, Laurel, MD 20708, USA. mona.calvo@fda.hhs.gov
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2013 Jul;136:211-3
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Food, Fortified
Humans
Legislation, Food - trends
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
United States - epidemiology
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
Widespread poor vitamin D status in all age and gender groups in the United States (USA) and Canada increases the need for new food sources. Currently ~60% of the intake of vitamin D from foods is from fortified foods in these countries. Those groups in greatest need are consuming significantly lower amounts of commonly fortified foods such as milk. Both countries allow voluntary vitamin D fortification of some other foods, although in Canada this practice is only done on a case-by-case basis. Novel approaches to vitamin D fortification of food in both countries now include "bio-addition" in which food staples are fortified through the addition of another vitamin D-rich food to animal feed during production, or manipulation of food post-harvest or pre-processing. These bio-addition approaches provide a wider range of foods containing vitamin D, and thus appeal to differing preferences, cultures and possibly economic status. An example is the post-harvest exposure of edible mushrooms to ultraviolet light. However, further research into safety and efficacy of bio-addition needs to be established in different target populations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'.
PubMed ID
23104118 View in PubMed
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Frequency of meat and fish intake and risk of breast cancer in a prospective study of 14,500 Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25158
Source
Int J Cancer. 1990 Jul 15;46(1):12-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1990
Author
L J Vatten
K. Solvoll
E B Løken
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1990 Jul 15;46(1):12-5
Date
Jul-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Diet Surveys
Female
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Meat
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The association between the frequency of meat and fish intake and the incidence rate of breast cancer has been analyzed in 152 incident cases that developed among 14,500 Norwegian women during 11 to 14 years of follow-up. At the time of dietary inquiry they were between 35 and 51 years of age. A positive association was observed between the frequency of overall meat intake and breast cancer risk. There was an age-adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.8 (95% confidence limits, 1.1 and 3.1) for women who had a main meal with meat 5 times or more per week compared to women who had 2 meat dinners or less per week, and this association displayed a linear trend (chi 2 trend = 4.30, p = 0.04). No association was detected between the overall frequency of fish for dinner and breast cancer risk (chi 2 trend = 1.39, p = 0.24), but there was an inverse relation with the frequency of main meals containing fish in poached form. The age-adjusted IRR was 0.7 (95% confidence limits, 0.4 and 1.0) for women who had poached fish for dinner at least 5 times per month compared to women who had fish in this form twice monthly or less often (chi 2 trend = 3.56, p = 0.06). The positive association with meat may be in accordance with the hypothesis that dietary fat increases the risk of breast cancer. Although there was no association with overall fish intake, the inverse relation with poached fish might deserve further investigation.
PubMed ID
2365494 View in PubMed
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Health Canada's Food Directorate. Introduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134097
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):696-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011

Estimation of traditional food intake in indigenous communities in Denendeh and the Yukon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61496
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):46-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Malek Batal
Katherine Gray-Donald
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Olivier Receveur
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, American University of Beirut, Lebanon. malek.batal@aub.edu.lb
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):46-54
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Energy Metabolism
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Male
Meat
Multicenter Studies
Northwest Territories
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Population Groups
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Seafood
Vegetables
Yukon Territory
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Chronic non-communicable diseases related to excessive or unbalanced dietary intakes are on the rise among some Indigenous populations in Canada. Nutritional problems of Indigenous peoples arise in the transition from a traditional diet to a market diet characterized by highly processed foods with reduced nutrient density. This study aimed at assessing traditional food intake of Indigenous people in 18 communities. STUDY DESIGN: This study was cross-sectional with a sample size of 1,356. METHODS: This study used food frequency and 24-hour recall questionnaires to quantify traditional food intake in 18 communities in the McKenzie basin of the Northwest Territories (Denendeh and the Yukon). RESULTS: Typical daily intakes of groups of traditional food items were generated and intake of an extensive list of traditional food detailed for adult men and women. Per capita intake of traditional food items was also calculated. CONCLUSION: Reliance on traditional food intake is still high in Denendeh, as well as in the Yukon. The detailed description of the traditional food system presented here allows an accurate identification of the contribution of traditional food items to nutrient and contaminant intake by Indigenous people for future studies.
PubMed ID
15776992 View in PubMed
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Fish consumption among pregnant women in London, Ontario: associations with socio-demographic and health and lifestyle factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160456
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):389-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jessica M Sontrop
M Karen Campbell
Susan E Evers
Kathy N Speechley
William R Avison
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON. jsontrop@gmail.com
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):389-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Diet
Fatty Acids, Omega-3
Female
Food Habits
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Surveys
Ontario
Poisson Distribution
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Seafood - utilization
Abstract
Intake of fish and omega-3 fatty acids is inversely related to adverse health outcomes; however, these relationships may be confounded by socio-economic status and health behaviours. This study's purpose was to describe the socio-demographic, health and lifestyle correlates of fish consumption among pregnant women.
Pregnant women (n=2394) completed a telephone interview between 10-22 weeks' gestation (London, Ontario, 2002-5) containing questions on socio-demographic, health and lifestyle variables; dietary intake was measured using a 106-item validated food-frequency questionnaire. Unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios were obtained using a modified Poisson regression model.
Infrequent fish consumption,
PubMed ID
17985681 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.