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Aboriginal Cultural Competency in Dietetics: A National Survey of Canadian Registered Dietitians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293524
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2017 12 01; 78(4):172-176
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-01-2017
Author
Paige Huycke
Jillian Ingribelli
Lee Rysdale
Author Affiliation
a Northern Ontario Dietetic Internship Program, Sault Ste. Marie, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2017 12 01; 78(4):172-176
Date
12-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Clinical Competence
Cultural Competency - education
Cultural Diversity
Diet
Dietary Services
Dietetics - education
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritionists - education
Ontario
Preceptorship
Young Adult
Abstract
Little has been published on cultural competency curriculum and dietetics considering the impact of food-related beliefs and behaviours on health. A 14-item online survey was administered in January 2016 to 145 participants (125 members of Dietitians of Canada Aboriginal Nutrition Network and 20 dietitians with an interest in Aboriginal nutrition). Questions included multiple choice and ranking responses and were pretested by 4 preceptors with the Northern Ontario Dietetic Internship Program (NODIP). Quantitative data analysis included frequencies, pivot tables, and averaging/grouping of ranking scores. A total of 42 individuals (29%) completed the survey. The majority rated the 5 health and cultural competencies and 6 food and nutrition competencies as "important" (90%-98% and 86%-100%, respectively). Overall, the competency related to identifying health status was ranked highest (78%), whereas developing culturally appropriate recipes was ranked lowest (83%). Most participants (95%) believed that all dietitians and graduating dietetic interns should be minimally competent in Aboriginal health and culture. The initial 11 draft competencies for dietetic interns were condensed to 6 minimum and 2 advanced competencies. Results will inform dietitians working with Aboriginal peoples and refinement of NODIP intern and preceptor tools, with the potential to integrate across Canadian dietetic internship programs.
PubMed ID
28333567 View in PubMed
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Action schools! BC--Healthy Eating: effects of a whole-school model to modifying eating behaviours of elementary school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155339
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):328-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
Meghan E Day
Karen S Strange
Heather A McKay
Patti-Jean Naylor
Author Affiliation
School of Physical Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):328-31
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Feasibility Studies
Feeding Behavior
Female
Focus Groups
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Social Marketing
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The rate of obesity and associated risk factors in Canadian youth is increasing at an alarming rate. Nutrition plays an important role in weight maintenance. This study reports the effectiveness of Action Schools! BC---Healthy Eating, a school-based fruit and vegetable (FV) intervention, in effecting change in: 1) students' intake of FV, 2) students' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding FV, and 3) students' willingness to try new FV.
Five schools that represented geographic, socio-economic and size variation were recruited as Action Schools! BC--Healthy Eating intervention schools. A second set of five schools were selected as matched healthy eating usual practice schools. Student outcomes were measured at baseline and at 12-week follow-up using self-report questionnaires. Classroom logs and progress reports were used to assess implementation dose and fidelity. The intervention included school-wide activities based on individualized Action Plans addressing goals across six Action Zones.
Significant differences were found between conditions over time while controlling for baseline levels. Fruit servings, FV servings, FV variety, and percent of FV tried from a fixed list increased in intervention schools. Teachers implemented a mean of 64% of requested classroom dose, and school Action Teams implemented activities across 80% of the whole-school model.
A whole-school framework can impact FV intake, but results were modest due to implementation issues. Further implementation and evaluation are necessary to fully understand the effectiveness of this initiative.
PubMed ID
18767281 View in PubMed
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[Actual diet of children in orphanages]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31096
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(5):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
A T Elizarov
L P Volkotrub
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(5):7-10
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutrition
Calcium - analysis
Child
Child Nutrition
Diet
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
English Abstract
Female
Food
Food Services - standards
Humans
Iodine - analysis
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Orphanages
Phosphorus - analysis
Siberia
Trace Elements - analysis
Vitamins - analysis
Abstract
The account of quantitative and qualitative structure of diets of children of children's houses has revealed infringements in organisation of mode of a meals, and also unbalance of diet on structure of food substances, including on iodine, that can promote development of iodine-dependence diseases.
PubMed ID
12599990 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and evaluation of the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire and nutrient database for Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165732
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Ilona Csizmadi
Lisa Kahle
Ruth Ullman
Ursula Dawe
Thea Palmer Zimmerman
Christine M Friedenreich
Heather Bryant
Amy F Subar
Author Affiliation
Division of Population Health and Information, Alberta Cancer Board, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 4N2. ilona.csizmadi@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Databases, Factual
Female
Food - classification
Food analysis
Food Habits
Food Supply
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Vitamins - analysis
Abstract
Despite assumed similarities in Canadian and US dietary habits, some differences in food availability and nutrient fortification exist. Food-frequency questionnaires designed for the USA may therefore not provide the most accurate estimates of dietary intake in Canadian populations. Hence, we undertook to evaluate and modify the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and nutrient database.
Of the foods queried on the DHQ, those most likely to differ in nutrient composition were identified. Where possible these foods were matched to comparable foods in the Canadian Nutrient File. Nutrient values were examined and modified to reflect the Canadian content of minerals (calcium, iron, zinc) and vitamins (A, C, D, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and B12). DHQs completed by 13 181 Alberta Cohort Study participants aged 35-69 years were analysed to estimate nutrient intakes using the original US and modified versions of the DHQ databases. Misclassification of intake for meeting the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) was determined following analysis with the US nutrient database.
Twenty-five per cent of 2411 foods deemed most likely to differ in nutrient profile were subsequently modified for folate, 11% for vitamin D, 10% for calcium and riboflavin, and between 7 and 10% for the remaining nutrients of interest. Misclassification with respect to meeting the DRI varied but was highest for folate (7%) and vitamin A (7%) among men, and for vitamin D (7%) among women over 50 years of age.
Errors in nutrient intake estimates owing to differences in food fortification between the USA and Canada can be reduced in Canadian populations by using nutrient databases that reflect Canadian fortification practices.
PubMed ID
17212847 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of dietary fibre intake in 5-8 year old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92983
Source
Ir Med J. 2008 Apr;101(4):118-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Glackin L M
Fraser M.
O Neill M B
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Mayo General Hospital, Castlebar, Co Mayo.
Source
Ir Med J. 2008 Apr;101(4):118-20
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Constipation - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber
Female
Food Habits
Health promotion
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ireland
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Risk factors
Abstract
Despite its health implications, the fibre intake of Irish children is unknown. The North/South Ireland Food Consumption Survey indicated that 77% of Irish adults do not consume adequate fibre and surveys of children and adolescents in Canada and Sweden have confirmed suboptimal fibre intake in these groups. This study undertook to assess fibre intake and the incidence of constipation in Irish children aged 5-8 years. Children admitted to hospital with an acute self-limiting medical illness were included in the study. Three day food diaries were recorded on discharge from hospital. The presence of constipation was ascertained Seventy six per cent of 135 children s diets did not contain adequate fibre. The incidence of constipation was 13.6% in those with inadequate fibre intake as opposed to 6% in those with adequate fibre intake. Poor dietary fibre needs to be addressed in the context of health promotion and disease prevention involving parents, health care professionals and government public policy.
PubMed ID
18557515 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of food spending is related to housing expenditures among lower-income Canadian households.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161594
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Dec;10(12):1464-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Sharon I Kirkpatrick
Valerie Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, FitzGerald Building Room 326, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3E2.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Dec;10(12):1464-73
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Food - economics
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Housing - economics
Humans
Income
Nutrition Surveys
Poverty
Abstract
A number of studies have pointed to the pressure that housing costs can exert on the resources available for food. The objectives of the present study were to characterise the relationship between the proportion of income absorbed by housing and the adequacy of household food expenditures across the Canadian population and within income quintiles; and to elucidate the impact of receipt of a housing subsidy on adequacy of food expenditures among low-income tenant households.
The 2001 Survey of Household Spending, conducted by Statistics Canada, was a national cross-sectional survey that collected detailed information on expenditures on goods and services. The adequacy of food spending was assessed in relation to the cost of a basic nutritious diet.
Canada.
The person with primary responsibility for financial maintenance from 15 535 households from all provinces and territories.
As the proportion of income allocated to housing increased, food spending adequacy declined significantly among households in the three lowest income quintiles. After accounting for household income and composition, receipt of a housing subsidy was associated with an improvement in adequacy of food spending among low-income tenant households, but still mean food spending fell below the cost of a basic nutritious diet even among subsidised households.
This study indicates that housing costs compromise the food access of some low-income households and speaks to the need to re-examine policies related to housing affordability and income adequacy.
PubMed ID
17764603 View in PubMed
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Source
Z Ernahrungswiss. 1964 May;25:4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1964
Author
J. SIGURJONSSON
Source
Z Ernahrungswiss. 1964 May;25:4-7
Date
May-1964
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ascorbic acid
Iceland
Nutrition Surveys
PubMed ID
14224701 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147344
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
  1 document  
Author
Alastair B Ross
Asa Johansson
Veronika Vavruch-Nilsson
Sven Hassler
Per Sjölander
Anette Edin-Liljegren
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Alastair.Ross@rdls.nestle.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
372451
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Population Groups
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the nutrient and food intake of Sami still engaged in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle or reindeer-herding Sami [RS]) and Sami not involved in reindeer herding (industrialized lifestyle or non-reindeer-herding Sami [NRS]) with other northern Swedish populations.
Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden.
Data were used from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Sami recruited into this study were divided according to whether they were involved in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle, RS) (66 females, 79 males) or not (NRS) (255 females, 195 males), and compared to non-Sami from the same area taking part in the same study (controls) (499 females, 501 males). Subjects completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and clinical parameters were analysed.
RS had a higher overall intake of energy for both females (P
PubMed ID
19917189 View in PubMed
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600 records – page 1 of 60.