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Tutorial in biostatistics: Analyzing associations between total plasma homocysteine and B vitamins using optimal categorization and segmented regression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167079
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;27(4):188-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Heejung Bang
Madhu Mazumdar
David Spence
Author Affiliation
Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA. heb2013@med.cornell.edu
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;27(4):188-200
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada - epidemiology
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Folic Acid - blood
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Models, Statistical
Nutrition Surveys
Regression Analysis
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Vitamin B Complex - blood
Abstract
Data analysts consider standard regression models (e.g., generalized linear model) or nonparametric smoothing techniques (e.g., loess or splines) when examining the association between two variables. Before this step, a quantile-based summarization is typically used for exploring the exposure-response relationship. Unfortunately, these exploratory approaches may not be optimal or efficient for guiding the formal analysis in many biological and nutritional data settings. We suggest a recently developed method for selection of cutpoints as a tool of data summary and segmented regression as a modeling approach in the analysis of plasma total homocysteine and related vitamins. These methods are often complementary in discovering the underlying complex pattern of association.
PubMed ID
17035715 View in PubMed
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Appropriate calcium fortification of the food supply presents a challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184684
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jul;133(7):2232-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Louise Johnson-Down
Mary R L'Abbé
Nora S Lee
Katherine Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Ste Anne de Bellevue, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jul;133(7):2232-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Calcium - administration & dosage
Canada
Food Supply
Food, Fortified
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Abstract
Fortification with calcium to increase dietary intakes of this mineral is currently under evaluation in Canada. To model the potential dietary consequences of food fortification, data from a large national survey of Canadians (n = 1543) were used. Food fortification scenarios were based on reference amounts for labeling requirements. Consumption of milk, cheese and other dairy products was associated with high calcium intakes, and there was a low prevalence of inadequacy in men
PubMed ID
12840185 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of dietary fibre intake in 5-8 year old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92983
Source
Ir Med J. 2008 Apr;101(4):118-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Glackin L M
Fraser M.
O Neill M B
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Mayo General Hospital, Castlebar, Co Mayo.
Source
Ir Med J. 2008 Apr;101(4):118-20
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Constipation - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber
Female
Food Habits
Health promotion
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ireland
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Risk factors
Abstract
Despite its health implications, the fibre intake of Irish children is unknown. The North/South Ireland Food Consumption Survey indicated that 77% of Irish adults do not consume adequate fibre and surveys of children and adolescents in Canada and Sweden have confirmed suboptimal fibre intake in these groups. This study undertook to assess fibre intake and the incidence of constipation in Irish children aged 5-8 years. Children admitted to hospital with an acute self-limiting medical illness were included in the study. Three day food diaries were recorded on discharge from hospital. The presence of constipation was ascertained Seventy six per cent of 135 children s diets did not contain adequate fibre. The incidence of constipation was 13.6% in those with inadequate fibre intake as opposed to 6% in those with adequate fibre intake. Poor dietary fibre needs to be addressed in the context of health promotion and disease prevention involving parents, health care professionals and government public policy.
PubMed ID
18557515 View in PubMed
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Obesity and the eating habits of the Aboriginal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93234
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Mar;19(1):21-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Garriguet Didier
Author Affiliation
Health Information and Research Division at Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0T6. didier.garriguet@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Mar;19(1):21-35
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Energy Intake - ethnology
Feeding Behavior - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Leisure Activities
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This article compares rates of overweight/obesity and obesity and food consumption patterns of off-reserve Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people aged 19 to 50 in Ontario and the western provinces. DATA SOURCES; The data are from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey: Nutrition (cycle 2.2). ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Cross-sectional analyses were used to estimate the percentages of individuals who were overweight/obese or obese and average nutrient consumption, based on Aboriginal identity and other selected characteristics. Logistic regression was used to determine the independent influence of Aboriginal identity on overweight/obesity and obesity. MAIN RESULTS: In 2004, the overweight/obesity and obesity rates of off-reserve Aboriginal people aged 19 to 50 were higher than those of the non-Aboriginal population. These overall differences primarily reflected higher rates of overweight/obesity and obesity among Aboriginal women. At ages 19 to 30, these differences can partly be explained by higher calorie intake by Aboriginal women, despite identical energy needs, based on height, weight, age and physical activity. Most of the excess calories are eaten as snacks and come from "other foods".
PubMed ID
18457209 View in PubMed
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The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure in community resident homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93642
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 May;17(9):1211-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Wikby Kerstin
Ek Anna-Christina
Christensson Lennart
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University College of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. kerstin.wikby@telia.com
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 May;17(9):1211-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Residential Facilities
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVITIES: The aims were to test internal consistency and interrater reliability of Mini Nutritional Assessment during implementation of Mini Nutritional Assessment in community residential homes and to test sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic predictivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form vs. Mini Nutritional Assessment. BACKGROUND: There is a need in clinical practice to assess nutritional status in older people and to identify those who could benefit from early intervention. METHODS: The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure (Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form and Mini Nutritional Assessment) was used in 127 older people admitted to eight residential homes. In three of those homes (A, B and C), registered nurses simultaneously performed the assessment procedure, after receiving education and training. The intention was to offer the registered nurses a tool for independent practice use. RESULTS: Internal consistency was 0.68 (Cronbach's alpha) (n = 127). In residential home A, B and C, the registered nurses carried out Mini Nutritional Assessment in 45 residents out of 68. The agreement level between the author's and the registered nurses' assessments was 62% (kappa 0.41). In residential home A, B and C, the agreement level was 89%, 89% and 44%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic predictivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form vs. Mini Nutritional Assessment were 89%, 82% and 92%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure seems to be a useful tool to identify residents in need of nutritional interventions, despite the registered nurses not carrying out Mini Nutritional Assessment in all residents and the low agreement in residential home C. It indicates that to implement and use Mini Nutritional Assessment in nursing care demands the creating necessary staff resources, such as adequate staffing, sufficient education and continual supervision. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Because of the high sensitivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form and Mini Nutritional Assessment, Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form alone might be sufficient for practice use, as its simplicity might increase its usefulness.
PubMed ID
18266849 View in PubMed
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Interrelationships of added sugars intake, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity in adults in the United States: National Health Interview Survey, 2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88350
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Aug;109(8):1376-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Thompson Frances E
McNeel Timothy S
Dowling Emily C
Midthune Douglas
Morrissette Meredith
Zeruto Christopher A
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Applied Research Program, Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch, 6130 Executive Blvd, EPN 4095A, Bethesda, MD 20892-7344, USA. thompsof@mail.nih.gov
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Aug;109(8):1376-83
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Health Surveys
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweetening Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The consumption of added sugars (eg, white sugar, brown sugar, and high-fructose corn syrup) displaces nutrient-dense foods in the diet. The intake of added sugars in the United States is excessive. Little is known about the predictors of added sugar intake. OBJECTIVE: To examine the independent relationships of socioeconomic status and race/ethnicity with added sugar intake, and to evaluate the consistency of relationships using a short instrument to those from a different survey using more precise dietary assessment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, nationally representative, interviewer-administered survey. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Adults (aged > or = 18 years) participating in the 2005 US National Health Interview Survey Cancer Control Supplement responding to four added sugars questions (n=28,948). STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: The intake of added sugars was estimated using validated scoring algorithms. Multivariate analysis incorporating sample weights and design effects was conducted. Least squares means and confidence intervals, and significance tests using Wald F statistics are presented. Analyses were stratified by sex and controlled for potential confounders. RESULTS: The intake of added sugars was higher among men than women and inversely related to age, educational status, and family income. Asian Americans had the lowest intake and Hispanics the next lowest intake. Among men, African Americans had the highest intake, although whites and American Indians/Alaskan Natives also had high intakes. Among women, African Americans and American Indians/Alaskan Natives had the highest intakes. Intake of added sugars was inversely related to educational attainment in whites, African Americans, Hispanic men, and American Indians/Alaskan Native men, but was unrelated in Asian Americans. These findings were generally consistent with relationships in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004 (using one or two 24-hour dietary recalls). CONCLUSIONS: Race/ethnicity, family income, and educational status are independently associated with intake of added sugars. Groups with low income and education are particularly vulnerable to diets with high added sugars. Differences among race/ethnicity groups suggest that interventions to reduce intake of added sugars should be tailored. The National Health Interview Survey added sugars questions with accompanying scoring algorithms appear to provide an affordable and useful means of assessing relationships between various factors and added sugars intake.
PubMed ID
19631043 View in PubMed
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Folate intakes and awareness of folate to prevent neural tube defects: a survey of women living in Vancouver, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186631
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Feb;103(2):181-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Melissa R French
Susan I Barr
Ryna Levy-Milne
Author Affiliation
Osteoporosis Research Program, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Feb;103(2):181-5
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food, Fortified
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Middle Aged
Neural Tube Defects - prevention & control
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Preconception Care
Questionnaires
Abstract
To estimate folate intake and knowledge in women of childbearing age, in relation to risk of neural tube defects.
One hundred forty-eight women (aged 18 to 45 years) in the Vancouver area of British Columbia, Canada.
Using an interviewer-administered survey, we examined women for folate knowledge and the relation of folate knowledge to intake in a random sample. Contribution of folate from food, fortified grain products, and supplements was assessed by validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire.
Descriptive statistics, t tests, Chi;(2), Pearson correlation analysis.
Mean daily folate intake from food, fortified foods, and supplementation was 812+/-710 Dietary Folate Equivalents (DFE)/day. Fortification of bread and grain products contributed 104+/-68 microg synthetic folic acid (SFA)/day (equal to 174+/-114 DFE), and supplements contributed 205+/-388 microg SFA/day. Although 86% of women met the Estimated Average Requirement (320 DFE/day) for folate, only 26% met the recommendation (400 microg SFA/day) for women capable of becoming pregnant. Most (95%) of the women had heard of folate, but only 25% knew that it could prevent birth defects. One-fourth of the women had good or very good knowledge of folate-rich foods. However, folate knowledge was not related to its intake. The most common sources of folate information were magazines/newspapers, doctors, and television/radio. Lack of awareness of the importance of folate was the most common reason given for choosing not to use folic acid supplements before pregnancy. However, 78% of the women indicated that, with knowledge of the benefits of folate, they would use supplemental folic acid daily to reduce the risk of birth defects.
Educational strategies are required to increase folate awareness among women and to promote the benefits of periconceptional folic acid supplementation. Targeting physicians to educate women on the importance of folate could be a potentially successful route. J
PubMed ID
12589323 View in PubMed
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Diet quality and cancer incidence in Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186633
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2002;43(2):127-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Angela L Fitzgerald
Ron A Dewar
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4H7.
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2002;43(2):127-32
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Diet - standards
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Risk factors
Abstract
Cancer rates in the province of Nova Scotia, Canada, are among the highest in the country and coincide with elevated rates of risk factors such as smoking, poor diet, and obesity. To investigate the importance of diet on cancer, using data from the 1990 Nova Scotia Nutrition Survey, we developed a diet quality score reflecting compliance with 17 nutrient recommendations. The survey data were subsequently linked with the provincial cancer registry, and the relationship between diet quality and cancer was quantified using logistic regression. Our results support an inverse relationship between diet quality and cancer, although limited statistical power resulting from our small study sample did not reveal any statistically significant relationships. We estimated that cancer incidence could potentially be reduced by approximately 35% through improved diet quality. On the basis of poor diet, nutrition-related factors (high body mass index), our estimates of the preventable fraction of cancer, and the high provincial cancer rates, we recommend health promotion strategies aimed at improving diet quality in Nova Scotia.
PubMed ID
12588692 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the Micro-Nutrica Nutritional Analysis program and the Russian Food Composition Database using data from the Baltic Nutrition Surveys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180955
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Apr;58(4):573-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
S. Vaask
J. Pomerleau
I. Pudule
D. Grinberga
A. Abaravicius
A. Robertson
M. McKee
Author Affiliation
Food Processing Institute, Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn, Estonia. sirje.vaask@haigekassa.ee
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Apr;58(4):573-9
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Baltic States
Databases, Factual
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Food analysis
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Russia
Abstract
The objective of this study was to compare the nutrient content of foods and diets based on data from two food composition databases used in the Baltic Nutrition Surveys (conducted in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania in 1997): an adapted version of the Finnish Micro-Nutrica Nutritional Analysis program (used in Estonia) and the Russian Institute of Nutrition Food Composition Database (used in Latvia and Lithuania).
The adapted Micro-Nutrica and Russian databases were used to estimate the energy and nutrient (protein, fat, carbohydrate, vitamin C, calcium and iron) content of 15 common foodstuffs in the region and the nutrient intakes of 32 Latvian respondents (based on 24-h recalls). Differences between databases were estimated.
There were discrepancies in the energy and nutrient content of the 15 selected foods using the two databases. The adapted Micro-Nutrica database generally gave a lower energy content than the Russian database (median: -6%), and a lower fat content for typically fat-rich foods. Intakes of energy, fat, carbohydrate and calcium by the 32 selected respondents were significantly lower when the Micro-Nutrica database was used. Differences were particularly high for fat (difference=-23.5%, 95% confidence interval=-31.1 to -15.8%, P
PubMed ID
15042124 View in PubMed
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[Should healthy people take a daily vitamin pill?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81879
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 22;168(21):2051-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-22-2006
Author
Ovesen Lars F
Author Affiliation
Hjerteforeningen, Hauser Plads 10, DK-1127 København K. lovesen@hjerteforeningen.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 22;168(21):2051-8
Date
May-22-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - administration & dosage
Nutrition Surveys
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Tablets
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
About 50% of the Danish population take a daily multivitamin-mineral (MVM) supplement despite the demonstration that the dietary intake of vitamins and minerals is sufficient to cover the needs of most healthy Danes. This systematic review, which includes prospective studies of the significance of MVM in disease risk as well as in other somatic and mental functions in humans, does not find evidence of a beneficial effect of vitamin and mineral supplementation in the healthy Danish population.
PubMed ID
16768922 View in PubMed
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145 records – page 1 of 15.