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Adherence to special diets and its association with meeting the nutrient recommendations in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294978
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
A J Ahola
C Forsblom
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, University of Helsinki, Biomedicum Helsinki C318b, PO Box 63, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diet therapy - epidemiology
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet, Diabetic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Not much is known about adherence to special diets in type 1 diabetes, characteristics of individuals with special diets, and whether such practices should raise concerns with respect to meeting the dietary recommendations. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of adherence to special diets, in a population of individuals with type 1 diabetes, and investigated the association between special diet adherence and dietary intake, measured as dietary patterns and nutrient intakes.
During the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study visit, participants with type 1 diabetes (n?=?1429) were instructed to complete a diet questionnaire inquiring about the adherence to special diets. The participants also completed a food record, from which energy and nutrient intakes were calculated.
In all, 36.6% participants reported adhering to some special diet. Most commonly reported special diets were lactose-free (17.1%), protein restriction (10.0%), vegetarian (7.0%), and gluten-free (5.6%) diet. Special diet adherents were more frequently women, older, had longer diabetes duration, and more frequently had various diabetes complications. Mean carbohydrate intakes were close to the lower levels of the recommendation in all diet groups, which was reflected in low mean fibre intakes but high frequencies of meeting the sucrose recommendations. The recommendation for saturated fatty acid intake was frequently unmet, with the highest frequencies observed in vegetarians. Of the micronutrients, vitamin D, folate, and iron recommendations were most frequently unmet, with some differences between the diet groups.
Special diets are frequently followed by individuals with type 1 diabetes. The adherents are more frequently women, and have longer diabetes duration and more diabetes complications. Achieving the dietary recommendations differed between diets, and depended on the nutrient in question. Overall, intakes of fibre, vitamin D, folate, and iron fell short of the recommendations.
PubMed ID
29777369 View in PubMed
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The relationship between maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D status in pregnancy and childhood adiposity and allergy: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295061
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2017 Dec; 41(12):1755-1760
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Dec-2017
Author
V T Boyle
E B Thorstensen
J M D Thompson
L M E McCowan
E A Mitchell
K M Godfrey
L Poston
C R Wall
R Murphy
W Cutfield
T Kenealy
L C Kenny
P N Baker
Author Affiliation
Gravida, National Centre for Growth and Development and The Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2017 Dec; 41(12):1755-1760
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Asthma - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Child, Preschool
Eczema - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Mothers
Nutrition Surveys
Pediatric Obesity - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
Vitamin D insufficiency (defined as
Notes
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PubMed ID
28775375 View in PubMed
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Appropriate calcium fortification of the food supply presents a challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184684
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jul;133(7):2232-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Louise Johnson-Down
Mary R L'Abbé
Nora S Lee
Katherine Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Ste Anne de Bellevue, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jul;133(7):2232-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Calcium - administration & dosage
Canada
Food Supply
Food, Fortified
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Abstract
Fortification with calcium to increase dietary intakes of this mineral is currently under evaluation in Canada. To model the potential dietary consequences of food fortification, data from a large national survey of Canadians (n = 1543) were used. Food fortification scenarios were based on reference amounts for labeling requirements. Consumption of milk, cheese and other dairy products was associated with high calcium intakes, and there was a low prevalence of inadequacy in men
PubMed ID
12840185 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of dietary fibre intake in 5-8 year old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92983
Source
Ir Med J. 2008 Apr;101(4):118-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Glackin L M
Fraser M.
O Neill M B
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Mayo General Hospital, Castlebar, Co Mayo.
Source
Ir Med J. 2008 Apr;101(4):118-20
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Constipation - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber
Female
Food Habits
Health promotion
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ireland
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Risk factors
Abstract
Despite its health implications, the fibre intake of Irish children is unknown. The North/South Ireland Food Consumption Survey indicated that 77% of Irish adults do not consume adequate fibre and surveys of children and adolescents in Canada and Sweden have confirmed suboptimal fibre intake in these groups. This study undertook to assess fibre intake and the incidence of constipation in Irish children aged 5-8 years. Children admitted to hospital with an acute self-limiting medical illness were included in the study. Three day food diaries were recorded on discharge from hospital. The presence of constipation was ascertained Seventy six per cent of 135 children s diets did not contain adequate fibre. The incidence of constipation was 13.6% in those with inadequate fibre intake as opposed to 6% in those with adequate fibre intake. Poor dietary fibre needs to be addressed in the context of health promotion and disease prevention involving parents, health care professionals and government public policy.
PubMed ID
18557515 View in PubMed
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Obesity and the eating habits of the Aboriginal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93234
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Mar;19(1):21-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Garriguet Didier
Author Affiliation
Health Information and Research Division at Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0T6. didier.garriguet@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Mar;19(1):21-35
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Energy Intake - ethnology
Feeding Behavior - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Leisure Activities
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This article compares rates of overweight/obesity and obesity and food consumption patterns of off-reserve Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people aged 19 to 50 in Ontario and the western provinces. DATA SOURCES; The data are from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey: Nutrition (cycle 2.2). ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Cross-sectional analyses were used to estimate the percentages of individuals who were overweight/obese or obese and average nutrient consumption, based on Aboriginal identity and other selected characteristics. Logistic regression was used to determine the independent influence of Aboriginal identity on overweight/obesity and obesity. MAIN RESULTS: In 2004, the overweight/obesity and obesity rates of off-reserve Aboriginal people aged 19 to 50 were higher than those of the non-Aboriginal population. These overall differences primarily reflected higher rates of overweight/obesity and obesity among Aboriginal women. At ages 19 to 30, these differences can partly be explained by higher calorie intake by Aboriginal women, despite identical energy needs, based on height, weight, age and physical activity. Most of the excess calories are eaten as snacks and come from "other foods".
PubMed ID
18457209 View in PubMed
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The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure in community resident homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93642
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 May;17(9):1211-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Wikby Kerstin
Ek Anna-Christina
Christensson Lennart
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University College of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. kerstin.wikby@telia.com
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 May;17(9):1211-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Residential Facilities
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVITIES: The aims were to test internal consistency and interrater reliability of Mini Nutritional Assessment during implementation of Mini Nutritional Assessment in community residential homes and to test sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic predictivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form vs. Mini Nutritional Assessment. BACKGROUND: There is a need in clinical practice to assess nutritional status in older people and to identify those who could benefit from early intervention. METHODS: The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure (Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form and Mini Nutritional Assessment) was used in 127 older people admitted to eight residential homes. In three of those homes (A, B and C), registered nurses simultaneously performed the assessment procedure, after receiving education and training. The intention was to offer the registered nurses a tool for independent practice use. RESULTS: Internal consistency was 0.68 (Cronbach's alpha) (n = 127). In residential home A, B and C, the registered nurses carried out Mini Nutritional Assessment in 45 residents out of 68. The agreement level between the author's and the registered nurses' assessments was 62% (kappa 0.41). In residential home A, B and C, the agreement level was 89%, 89% and 44%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic predictivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form vs. Mini Nutritional Assessment were 89%, 82% and 92%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure seems to be a useful tool to identify residents in need of nutritional interventions, despite the registered nurses not carrying out Mini Nutritional Assessment in all residents and the low agreement in residential home C. It indicates that to implement and use Mini Nutritional Assessment in nursing care demands the creating necessary staff resources, such as adequate staffing, sufficient education and continual supervision. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Because of the high sensitivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form and Mini Nutritional Assessment, Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form alone might be sufficient for practice use, as its simplicity might increase its usefulness.
PubMed ID
18266849 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and correlates of insufficient calcium intake in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93949
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2007 Nov-Dec;24(6):511-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Angbratt Marianne
Timpka Toomas
Blomberg Carina
Kronhed Ann-Charlotte
Waller John
Wingren Gun
Möller Margareta
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2007 Nov-Dec;24(6):511-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Bone Density
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Deficiency Diseases - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Energy intake
Female
Forearm - radionuclide imaging
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between calcium intake in the diet, lifestyle factors, and forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in order to identify population subgroups for targeting by screening programs. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 15% of the inhabitants aged 20-79 years from 2 Swedish municipalities, and the subsample from one of the municipalities was invited to measurement of BMD. The survey response rate was 74% (n = 1,112/1,510) and participation in BMD measurements was 68% (n = 448/659). RESULTS: Only a tendency ( p = .085) toward direct association between calcium intake and forearm BMD was found, and the best multiple regression model was retained to explain BMD excluded calcium intake. Low calcium intake was, instead, in complementary analyses, found to be correlated with the factors old age, female sex, and urban residence in the best multiple regression model. CONCLUSIONS: Population subgroups whose calcium intake is in a range that justifies preventive action could be identified. Screening programs staffed by public health nurses can thereby be informed regarding the subgroups of the population that are at the highest risk of insufficient calcium intake.
PubMed ID
17973728 View in PubMed
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Fish consumption and risk of stroke in Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138323
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Mar;93(3):487-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Jarmo Virtamo
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Mar;93(3):487-93
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Seafood
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies of fish consumption in relation to risk of stroke have yielded inconsistent results.
In this study, we examined the association between fish consumption and stroke incidence in women.
We analyzed data from a population-based prospective cohort of 34,670 women in the Swedish Mammography Cohort who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline. Information on fish consumption was obtained by a self-administered questionnaire in 1997. Incident cases of stroke were ascertained from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs.
Over a mean follow-up of 10.4 y, we ascertained 1680 incident cases of stroke, including 1310 cerebral infarctions, 233 hemorrhagic strokes, and 137 unspecified strokes. Fish consumption was significantly inversely associated with risk of total stroke but not with cerebral infarction or hemorrhagic stroke. Compared with women in the lowest quintile of fish consumption (3.0 servings of fish/wk) was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.71, 0.98; P for trend = 0.049). Consumption of lean fish but not of other fish types was inversely associated with risk of stroke. The multivariable RR of total stroke was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.49, 0.93; P for trend = 0.07) for =3 servings of lean fish/wk compared with that for no consumption.
These results suggest that the consumption of fish, especially of lean fish, may reduce risk of stroke in women. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01127698.
Notes
Comment In: Womens Health (Lond Engl). 2011 May;7(3):279-8121612349
PubMed ID
21191140 View in PubMed
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Tutorial in biostatistics: Analyzing associations between total plasma homocysteine and B vitamins using optimal categorization and segmented regression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167079
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;27(4):188-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Heejung Bang
Madhu Mazumdar
David Spence
Author Affiliation
Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA. heb2013@med.cornell.edu
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;27(4):188-200
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada - epidemiology
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Folic Acid - blood
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Models, Statistical
Nutrition Surveys
Regression Analysis
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Vitamin B Complex - blood
Abstract
Data analysts consider standard regression models (e.g., generalized linear model) or nonparametric smoothing techniques (e.g., loess or splines) when examining the association between two variables. Before this step, a quantile-based summarization is typically used for exploring the exposure-response relationship. Unfortunately, these exploratory approaches may not be optimal or efficient for guiding the formal analysis in many biological and nutritional data settings. We suggest a recently developed method for selection of cutpoints as a tool of data summary and segmented regression as a modeling approach in the analysis of plasma total homocysteine and related vitamins. These methods are often complementary in discovering the underlying complex pattern of association.
PubMed ID
17035715 View in PubMed
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601 records – page 1 of 61.