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Traditional food intake is correlated with iron stores in Canadian Inuit men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126574
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Apr;142(4):764-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Jennifer A Jamieson
Hope A Weiler
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Apr;142(4):764-70
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - physiopathology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Ferritins - blood
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Inuits
Iron - administration & dosage - adverse effects - deficiency
Iron Overload - blood - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status - ethnology
Prevalence
Receptors, Transferrin - blood - chemistry
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
Accelerated loss of traditional lifestyles may place Inuit at risk of iron depletion given that anemia has been observed among Arctic men. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of anemia, storage iron depletion, and iron overload and to identify correlates of iron status in Canadian Inuit men. In a cross-sectional survey of 994 men in the International Polar Year Inuit Health Survey, 2007-2008, hemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF), soluble transferrin receptor (on a subset), CRP, RBC fatty acid composition, and Helicobacter pylori serology were measured in venous blood drawn from fasting men. Anthropometric, dietary, sociodemographic, and health data were collected. Dietary and nondietary correlates of iron status were assessed with multiple linear and logistic models. For men with CRP =10 mg/L (n = 804), 6.5% had depleted, 19.8% had low, and 10.3% had elevated iron stores. Anemia was moderately prevalent (16.1%), but iron deficiency anemia was less common (2.4%). There was a low probability of dietary iron inadequacy (2.4% Tolerable Upper Intake Level). Food-insecure men and those without a household hunter had a higher risk of low or depleted iron stores. Adiposity, traditional food intake, long-chain RBC PUFA status, and inflammation were positively associated with SF and food insecurity, smoking, and H. pylori seropositivity were negatively associated with SF. Despite a moderate prevalence of anemia, iron stores are largely adequate in this population, although lower than expected based on iron intake. The regulation of iron metabolism in this population and the high prevalence of anemia in older men warrants further investigation.
PubMed ID
22378332 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns are associated with dietary recommendations but have limited relationship to BMI in the Communities Advancing the Studies of Tribal Nations Across the Lifespan (CoASTAL) cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126866
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Oct;15(10):1948-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Marie K Fialkowski
Megan A McCrory
Sparkle M Roberts
J Kathleen Tracy
Lynn M Grattan
Carol J Boushey
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, USA.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Oct;15(10):1948-58
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Diet - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Diet Records
Diet, Vegetarian
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Washington
Young Adult
Abstract
Traditional food systems in indigenous groups have historically had health-promoting benefits. The objectives of the present study were to determine if a traditional dietary pattern of Pacific Northwest Tribal Nations (PNwT) could be derived using reduced rank regression and if the pattern would be associated with lower BMI and current Dietary Reference Intakes.
The baseline data from the Communities Advancing the Studies of Tribal Nations Across the Lifespan (CoASTAL) cohort were used to derive dietary patterns for the total sample and those with plausibly reported energy intakes.
Pacific Northwest Coast of Washington State, USA.
Adult PNwT members of the CoASTAL cohort with laboratory-measured weight and height and up to 4 d of dietary records (n 418).
A traditional dietary pattern did not evolve from the analysis. Moderate consumption of a sweet drinks dietary pattern was associated with lower BMI while higher consumption of a vegetarian-based dietary pattern was associated with higher BMI. The highest consumers of the vegetarian-based dietary pattern were almost six times more likely to meet the recommendations for dietary fibre.
Distinct dietary patterns were found. Further exploration is needed to confirm whether the lack of finding a traditional pattern is due to methodology or the loss of a traditional dietary pattern among this population. Longitudinal assessment of the CoASTAL cohort's dietary patterns needs to continue.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22348238 View in PubMed
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Health Canada's Food Directorate. Introduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134097
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):696-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011

Making sense of the latest advice on vitamin D therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134144
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011 Jun;22(6):994-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Rebeca D Monk
David A Bushinsky
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. Rebeca_Monk@URMC.Rochester.edu
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011 Jun;22(6):994-8
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chronic Disease
Dietary Supplements
Humans
Hypercalcemia - etiology
Kidney Diseases - blood - drug therapy
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
United States
Vitamin D - adverse effects - blood - therapeutic use
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - drug therapy
Abstract
The Institute of Medicine recently published recommendations for the daily intake and optimal serum levels of vitamin D based on an extensive review of the existing literature. Here we examine the issue and put levels of vitamin D in context for the general population and in patients with chronic kidney disease. Large randomized controlled trials are necessary to ensure that current recommendations are appropriate.
PubMed ID
21617120 View in PubMed
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Nutritional quality and price of food hampers distributed by a campus food bank: a Canadian experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104051
Source
J Health Popul Nutr. 2014 Jun;32(2):287-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Mahsa Jessri
Arvin Abedi
Alexander Wong
Ghazaleh Eslamian
Source
J Health Popul Nutr. 2014 Jun;32(2):287-300
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Dietary Fats
Energy intake
Food - economics
Food Supply - economics - methods
Fruit
Humans
Meat
Milk
Nutrition Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Nutritive Value - physiology
Recommended Dietary Allowances - economics
Students - statistics & numerical data
Universities
Vegetables
Abstract
Food insecurity is a mounting concern among Canadian post-secondary students. This study was conducted to evaluate the content of food hampers distributed by University of Alberta Campus Food Bank (CFB) and to assess the cost savings to students, using these hampers. Contents of hampers distributed among 1,857 students and their dependants since 2006 were evaluated against Canada's Food Guide (CFG) recommendations and Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). Hampers were aimed at serving university students and one to five members of their households located in Edmonton, Western Canada. One thousand eight hundred fifty-seven clients in Alberta, Canada, were included in the study. Although all hampers provided adequate energy, their fat and animal protein contents were low. Compared to the CFG recommendations, the requirements of milk and alternatives and meat and alternatives were not sufficiently met for clients using > or = 3-person hampers. None of food hampers (i.e. one- to five-person hampers) met the DRI recommendations for vitamin A and zinc. Clients of CFB received Canadian dollar (CN$) 14.88 to 64.3 worth of non-perishable food items in one- to five-person hampers respectively. Hampers provided from the CFB need improvement. Nutrients missing from the food hampers could be provided from fresh fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat products; however, these foods are more expensive than processed food items. The CFB provides a significant amount of savings to its clients even without considering the additional perishable donations that are provided to clients. Interpretation of our data required the assumption that all clients were consuming all of their hampers, which may not always be the case. Clients that do not fully consume their hampers may benefit less from the food bank.
PubMed ID
25076666 View in PubMed
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Validity of a single item food security questionnaire in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104271
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Jun;133(6):e1616-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Helga Bjørnøy Urke
Zhirong R Cao
Grace M Egeland
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Jun;133(6):e1616-23
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
Nutrition Surveys
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Assess sensitivity and specificity of each of the 18 US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Household Food Security Scale Module (HFSSM) questionnaire items to determine whether a rapid assessment of child and adult food insecurity is feasible in an Inuit population.
Food insecurity prevalence was assessed by the 18-item USDA HFSSM in a randomized sample of Inuit households participating in the Inuit Health Survey and the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey. Questions were evaluated for sensitivity, specificity, predictive value (+/2), and total percent accuracy for adult and child food insecurity (yes/no). Child food security items were evaluated for both surveys.
For children, the question “In the last 12 months, were there times when it was not possible to feed the children a healthy meal because there was not enough money?” had the best performance in both samples with a sensitivity and specificity of 92.3% and 97.3%, respectively, for the Inuit Health Survey, and 88.5% and 95.4% for the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey. For adults, the question “In the last 12 months, were there times when the food for you and your family just did not last and there was no money to buy more?” demonstrated a sensitivity of 93.0% and a specificity of 93.4%.
Rapid assessment of child and adult food insecurity is feasible and may be a useful tool for health care and social service providers. However, as prevalence and severity of food insecurity change over time, rapid assessment techniques should not replace periodic screening by using the full USDA HFSSM questionnaire.
PubMed ID
24864166 View in PubMed
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Associations between the school food environment, student consumption and body mass index of Canadian adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104637
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11(1):29
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Louise C Mâsse
Judith Evelyn de Niet-Fitzgerald
Allison W Watts
Patti-Jean Naylor
Elizabeth M Saewyc
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, F508-4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6H 3V4, Canada. lmasse@cfri.ubc.ca.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11(1):29
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages
Body mass index
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Habits
Food Services
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Sweeteners - administration & dosage
Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Schools
Socioeconomic Factors
Students
Young Adult
Abstract
Increasing attention has been paid to the school food environment as a strategy to reduce childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between the school food environment, students' dietary intake, and obesity in British Columbia (BC), Canada.
In 2007/08, principal responses about the school environment (N=174) were linked to grades 7-12 students (N=11,385) from corresponding schools, who participated in the BC Adolescent Health Survey. Hierarchical mixed-effect regression analyses examined the association between the school food environment and student's intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), food consumption, and body mass index. Analyses controlled for school setting, neighborhood education level and student's age and sex.
School availability of SSBs was positively associated with moderate (Odds Ratio (OR)=1.15, 95% Confidence Interval (CI)=1.02-1.30) and high (OR=1.43, 95% CI=1.13-1.80) SSB intake as were less healthful school nutrition guidelines for moderate SSB consumers only (OR=0.65, 95% CI=0.48-0.88). Availability of SSBs at school and its consumption were positively associated with student obesity (OR=1.50, 95% CI=1.12-2.01 and OR=1.66, 95% CI=1.19-2.34, respectively) but not with overweight. In contrast, consumption of less healthful food was positively associated with overweight (OR=1.03, 95% CI=1.01-1.06).
The results of this study provide further evidence to support the important role of schools in shaping adolescents' dietary habits. Availability and consumption of SSBs, but not less healthful foods, at school were associated with higher adolescent obesity highlighting that other environments also contribute to adolescent obesity.
Notes
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Comment In: BMJ. 2014;348:g231924671983
PubMed ID
24666770 View in PubMed
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Tutorial in biostatistics: Analyzing associations between total plasma homocysteine and B vitamins using optimal categorization and segmented regression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167079
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;27(4):188-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Heejung Bang
Madhu Mazumdar
David Spence
Author Affiliation
Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA. heb2013@med.cornell.edu
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;27(4):188-200
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada - epidemiology
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Folic Acid - blood
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Models, Statistical
Nutrition Surveys
Regression Analysis
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Vitamin B Complex - blood
Abstract
Data analysts consider standard regression models (e.g., generalized linear model) or nonparametric smoothing techniques (e.g., loess or splines) when examining the association between two variables. Before this step, a quantile-based summarization is typically used for exploring the exposure-response relationship. Unfortunately, these exploratory approaches may not be optimal or efficient for guiding the formal analysis in many biological and nutritional data settings. We suggest a recently developed method for selection of cutpoints as a tool of data summary and segmented regression as a modeling approach in the analysis of plasma total homocysteine and related vitamins. These methods are often complementary in discovering the underlying complex pattern of association.
PubMed ID
17035715 View in PubMed
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Adherence to special diets and its association with meeting the nutrient recommendations in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294978
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
A J Ahola
C Forsblom
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, University of Helsinki, Biomedicum Helsinki C318b, PO Box 63, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diet therapy - epidemiology
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet, Diabetic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Not much is known about adherence to special diets in type 1 diabetes, characteristics of individuals with special diets, and whether such practices should raise concerns with respect to meeting the dietary recommendations. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of adherence to special diets, in a population of individuals with type 1 diabetes, and investigated the association between special diet adherence and dietary intake, measured as dietary patterns and nutrient intakes.
During the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study visit, participants with type 1 diabetes (n?=?1429) were instructed to complete a diet questionnaire inquiring about the adherence to special diets. The participants also completed a food record, from which energy and nutrient intakes were calculated.
In all, 36.6% participants reported adhering to some special diet. Most commonly reported special diets were lactose-free (17.1%), protein restriction (10.0%), vegetarian (7.0%), and gluten-free (5.6%) diet. Special diet adherents were more frequently women, older, had longer diabetes duration, and more frequently had various diabetes complications. Mean carbohydrate intakes were close to the lower levels of the recommendation in all diet groups, which was reflected in low mean fibre intakes but high frequencies of meeting the sucrose recommendations. The recommendation for saturated fatty acid intake was frequently unmet, with the highest frequencies observed in vegetarians. Of the micronutrients, vitamin D, folate, and iron recommendations were most frequently unmet, with some differences between the diet groups.
Special diets are frequently followed by individuals with type 1 diabetes. The adherents are more frequently women, and have longer diabetes duration and more diabetes complications. Achieving the dietary recommendations differed between diets, and depended on the nutrient in question. Overall, intakes of fibre, vitamin D, folate, and iron fell short of the recommendations.
PubMed ID
29777369 View in PubMed
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Appropriate calcium fortification of the food supply presents a challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184684
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jul;133(7):2232-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Louise Johnson-Down
Mary R L'Abbé
Nora S Lee
Katherine Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Ste Anne de Bellevue, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jul;133(7):2232-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Calcium - administration & dosage
Canada
Food Supply
Food, Fortified
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Abstract
Fortification with calcium to increase dietary intakes of this mineral is currently under evaluation in Canada. To model the potential dietary consequences of food fortification, data from a large national survey of Canadians (n = 1543) were used. Food fortification scenarios were based on reference amounts for labeling requirements. Consumption of milk, cheese and other dairy products was associated with high calcium intakes, and there was a low prevalence of inadequacy in men
PubMed ID
12840185 View in PubMed
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601 records – page 1 of 61.