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28 records – page 1 of 3.

[Peculiarities of the nutrition of the population in various regions of the Russian Federation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62664
Source
Gig Sanit. 1967 Sep;32(9):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1967
Author
Iu R Khodosh
Source
Gig Sanit. 1967 Sep;32(9):30-3
Date
Sep-1967
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbohydrates
Cereals
Fruit
Humans
Meat
Nutrition Surveys
Oils
Russia
Siberia
Vegetables
PubMed ID
4239310 View in PubMed
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Intake of brassicaceous vegetables in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249093
Source
Can J Public Health. 1978 Jan-Feb;69(1):64-6
Publication Type
Article

Dietary guidelines and patterns of intake in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61784
Source
Br J Nutr. 1999 Apr;81 Suppl 2:S43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
J. Haraldsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark. jha@kvl.dk
Source
Br J Nutr. 1999 Apr;81 Suppl 2:S43-8
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Vegetables
Abstract
Food-based dietary guidelines in Denmark have usually been expressed in simple terms only and need to be elaborated. Quantitative recommendations on fruit and vegetable intake were issued in 1998, recommending 600 g/d (potatoes not included). This paper is based on a national dietary survey in 1995 (n = 3098, age range 1-80 years) supplemented with data from a simple frequency survey in 1995 (n = 1007, age range 15-80 years) and from the first national survey in 1985 (n = 2242, age range 15-80 years). Only data on adults are included in this paper. Fat intake, saturated fat in particular, is too high (median intake 37 %energy and 16 %energy, respectively). Main fat sources are separated fats (butter, margarine, oil, etc.: 40%), meat (18%), and dairy products (21%). Total fat intake decreased from 1985 to 1995 but fatty acid composition did not improve. Dietary fibre intake is from 18 to 22 g/d (women and men, respectively) with 62% from cereals, 24% from vegetables and 12% from fruit. Mean intake of vegetables and potatoes was from 200 to 250 g/d (women and men, respectively). Mean intake of fruit and vegetables (potatoes not included) was 277 g/d, or less than half of the new recommendation (600 g/d). Only 15% of participants in the frequency survey reported consuming both fruit and vegetables every day, and only 28% reported to do so almost every day. In conclusion, dietary intake in Denmark is characterized by a high intake of saturated fat and total fat, and by a relatively low intake of fruit and vegetables.
PubMed ID
10999025 View in PubMed
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More distinct food intake patterns among women than men in northern Sweden: a population-based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89959
Source
Nutr J. 2009;8:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Winkvist Anna
Hörnell Agneta
Hallmans Göran
Lindahl Bernt
Weinehall Lars
Johansson Ingegerd
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden. anna.winkvist@nutrition.gu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2009;8:12
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Smoking
Sweden
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The need to promote a healthy diet to curb the current obesity epidemic has today been recognized by most countries. A prerequisite for planning and evaluating interventions on dietary intake is the existence of valid information on long-term average dietary intake in a population. Few large, population-based studies of dietary intake have been carried out in Sweden. The largest to date is the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP), which was initiated in 1985, with data collection still ongoing. This paper reports on the first comprehensive analyses of the dietary data and presents dietary intake patterns among over 60,000 women and men in northern Sweden during 1992-2005. METHODS: Between 1992 and 2005, 71,367 inhabitants in Västerbotten county aged 30, 40, 50, and 60 years visited their local health care center as part of the VIP. Participants of VIP filled in an 84- or 64-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and provided sociodemographic information. Complete and realistic information on consumption frequency was provided by 62,531 individuals. Food intake patterns were analyzed using K-means cluster analyses. RESULTS: The mean daily energy intake was 6,83 (+/- 1,77) MJ among women and 8,71 (+/- 2,26) MJ among men. More than half of both women and men were classified as Low Energy Reporters (defined as individuals reporting a food intake level below the lower 95% confidence interval limit of the physical activity level). Larger variation in frequency of daily intake was seen among women than among men for most food groups. Among women, four dietary clusters were identified, labeled "Fruit and vegetables", "High fat", "Coffee and sandwich", and "Tea and ice cream". Among men, three dietary clusters were identified, labeled "Fruit and vegetables", "High fat", and "Tea, soda and cookies". CONCLUSION: More distinct food intake patterns were seen among women than men in this study in northern Sweden. Due to large proportions of Low Energy Reporters, our results on dietary intake may not be suitable for comparisons with recommended intake levels. However, the results on food intake patterns should still be valid and useful as a basis for targeting interventions to groups most in need.
PubMed ID
19228378 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiologic studies on role of nutrition in development of osteoarthrosis. Report 2. Actual consumption of food and risk assessment of their influence in development of osteoarthrosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146424
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2010;79(6):19-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
A N Martinchik
V N Khodyrev
E V Peskova
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2010;79(6):19-25
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Dairy Products
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Eating
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Meat products
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Osteoarthritis - epidemiology - etiology
Russia
Sex Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
We studied the actual consumption of specific food groups of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and analyzed the nutritional risk factors for OA in case-control study. Level of consumption of all types of dairy products was significantly lower in the group of patients with OA compared with controls. The relative risk of developing OA in the consumption of less than 573 g (median) of dairy products in terms of milk increases by 5-6 times.
PubMed ID
21395100 View in PubMed
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Meal patterns and food use in 10- to 11-year-old Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30904
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Jun;6(4):365-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Mila Haapalahti
Hannu Mykkänen
Sami Tikkanen
Jorma Kokkonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, FIN-90014, Finland. mila.haapalahti@uku.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Jun;6(4):365-70
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Candy
Child
Child Behavior - physiology
Child Nutrition
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the meal patterns and food use on weekdays among 10- to 11-year-old Finnish children and to analyse these in relation to family's socio-economic status and the child's behaviour. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study on a cohort of 404 children aged 10-11 years in the rural town of Ylivieska, mid-western Finland. METHODS: A food-frequency questionnaire including questions on meal patterns and food use and the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) completed by the parents and the child together. RESULTS: Practically all children (99%) ate breakfast regularly, 94% had a daily school lunch and 80% had dinner at home daily. Vegetables were consumed daily at home by 26% and fruits or berries by 21%, while 46% of the children had salad daily at school. Twenty-four per cent ate sweets daily or nearly so on weekdays. The children from families of high socio-economic status ate vegetables more often, and fewer of them used butter or high-fat milk. The children with no regular family dinner ate sweets and fast foods more often, and had higher total CBCL problem scores than those with a regular family dinner. CONCLUSION: Skipping meals appears not to be common among Finnish children aged 10-11 years, but a considerable proportion consume sweets frequently and vegetables infrequently. High family socio-economic status and a tendency to eat together are associated with healthy food choices among schoolchildren.
PubMed ID
12795824 View in PubMed
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Estimation of traditional food intake in indigenous communities in Denendeh and the Yukon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61496
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):46-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Malek Batal
Katherine Gray-Donald
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Olivier Receveur
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, American University of Beirut, Lebanon. malek.batal@aub.edu.lb
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):46-54
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Energy Metabolism
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Male
Meat
Multicenter Studies
Northwest Territories
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Population Groups
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Seafood
Vegetables
Yukon Territory
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Chronic non-communicable diseases related to excessive or unbalanced dietary intakes are on the rise among some Indigenous populations in Canada. Nutritional problems of Indigenous peoples arise in the transition from a traditional diet to a market diet characterized by highly processed foods with reduced nutrient density. This study aimed at assessing traditional food intake of Indigenous people in 18 communities. STUDY DESIGN: This study was cross-sectional with a sample size of 1,356. METHODS: This study used food frequency and 24-hour recall questionnaires to quantify traditional food intake in 18 communities in the McKenzie basin of the Northwest Territories (Denendeh and the Yukon). RESULTS: Typical daily intakes of groups of traditional food items were generated and intake of an extensive list of traditional food detailed for adult men and women. Per capita intake of traditional food items was also calculated. CONCLUSION: Reliance on traditional food intake is still high in Denendeh, as well as in the Yukon. The detailed description of the traditional food system presented here allows an accurate identification of the contribution of traditional food items to nutrient and contaminant intake by Indigenous people for future studies.
PubMed ID
15776992 View in PubMed
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Nutritional quality and price of food hampers distributed by a campus food bank: a Canadian experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104051
Source
J Health Popul Nutr. 2014 Jun;32(2):287-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Mahsa Jessri
Arvin Abedi
Alexander Wong
Ghazaleh Eslamian
Source
J Health Popul Nutr. 2014 Jun;32(2):287-300
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Dietary Fats
Energy intake
Food - economics
Food Supply - economics - methods
Fruit
Humans
Meat
Milk
Nutrition Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Nutritive Value - physiology
Recommended Dietary Allowances - economics
Students - statistics & numerical data
Universities
Vegetables
Abstract
Food insecurity is a mounting concern among Canadian post-secondary students. This study was conducted to evaluate the content of food hampers distributed by University of Alberta Campus Food Bank (CFB) and to assess the cost savings to students, using these hampers. Contents of hampers distributed among 1,857 students and their dependants since 2006 were evaluated against Canada's Food Guide (CFG) recommendations and Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). Hampers were aimed at serving university students and one to five members of their households located in Edmonton, Western Canada. One thousand eight hundred fifty-seven clients in Alberta, Canada, were included in the study. Although all hampers provided adequate energy, their fat and animal protein contents were low. Compared to the CFG recommendations, the requirements of milk and alternatives and meat and alternatives were not sufficiently met for clients using > or = 3-person hampers. None of food hampers (i.e. one- to five-person hampers) met the DRI recommendations for vitamin A and zinc. Clients of CFB received Canadian dollar (CN$) 14.88 to 64.3 worth of non-perishable food items in one- to five-person hampers respectively. Hampers provided from the CFB need improvement. Nutrients missing from the food hampers could be provided from fresh fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat products; however, these foods are more expensive than processed food items. The CFB provides a significant amount of savings to its clients even without considering the additional perishable donations that are provided to clients. Interpretation of our data required the assumption that all clients were consuming all of their hampers, which may not always be the case. Clients that do not fully consume their hampers may benefit less from the food bank.
PubMed ID
25076666 View in PubMed
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Use of voluntarily fortified foods among adults in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131216
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 May;15(5):802-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Tero Hirvonen
Anna Kara
Liisa Korkalo
Harri Sinkko
Marja-Leena Ovaskainen
Vera Mikkilä
Author Affiliation
Finnish Food Safety Authority, Risk Assessment Unit, Mustialankatu 3, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland. terohirvonen69@gmail.com
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 May;15(5):802-10
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dairy Products - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Food Habits - psychology
Food, Fortified - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Sex Distribution
Vegetables
Abstract
To investigate the purchase and use of fortified foods, and to explore and compare background characteristics, food consumption and nutrient intakes among users and non-users of voluntarily fortified foods in Finland.
A study based on the National FINDIET Survey 2007 (48 h recall), which included also a barcode-based product diary developed to assess the type, amount and users of voluntarily fortified foods. Logistic regression analysis was employed to investigate associations between background characteristics and the use of fortified foods.
Randomly chosen subgroup of 918 adult participants in the National FINDIET 2007 Survey.
Men and women aged 25-64 years from five regions.
The product group of voluntarily fortified foods purchased in the highest volume was yoghurts (44 % of the weight of all fortified food), followed by fruit drinks (36 %). The only characteristics independently associated with the use of voluntarily fortified foods were age (older people used them less commonly) and the consumption of fruit and vegetables (participants with the highest consumption used them more commonly). Users of fortified foods had higher consumption of yoghurt, juice drinks and ready-to-eat breakfast cereals (women only) than non-users, and lower consumption of boiled potatoes (men only).
Use of voluntarily fortified foods is associated with high consumption of fruit and vegetables but not with other health-related behaviours. The use of voluntarily fortified foods does not seem to even out the differences in nutrient intake among Finnish adults.
PubMed ID
21923976 View in PubMed
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[Diet of six-year-old Icelandic children - National dietary survey 2011-2012].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117006
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Jan;99(1):17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Hafdis Helgadottir
Birna Thorisdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Iceland. ingigun@hi.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Jan;99(1):17-23
Date
Jan-2013
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child Behavior
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats
Dietary Fiber
Dietary Sucrose
Energy intake
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Iceland
Minerals
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Seafood
Vegetables
Vitamins
Abstract
Knowledge of dietary habits makes the basis for public nutrition policy. The aim of this study was to assess dietary intake of Icelandic six-year-olds.
Subjects were randomly selected six-year-old children (n=162). Dietary intake was assessed by three-day-weighed food records. Food and nutrient intake was compared with the Icelandic food based dietary guidelines (FBDG) and recommended intake of vitamins and minerals.
Fruit and vegetable intake was on average 275±164 g/d, and less than 20% of the subjects consumed =400 g/day. Fish and cod liver oil intake was in line with the FBDG among approximately 25% of subjects. Most subjects (87%) consumed at least two portions of dairy products daily. Food with relatively low nutrient density (cakes, cookies, sugar sweetened drinks, sweets and ice-cream) provided up to 25% of total energy intake. The contribution of saturated fatty acids to total energy intake was 14.1%. Less than 20% of the children consumed dietary fibers in line with recommendations, and for saturated fat and salt only 5% consumed less than the recommended upper limits. Average intake of most vitamins and minerals, apart from vitamin-D, was higher than the recommended intake.
Although the vitamin and mineral density of the diet seems adequate, with the exception of vitamin-D, the contribution of low energy density food to total energy intake is high. Intake of vegetables, fruits, fish and cod liver oil is not in line with public recommendations. Strategies aiming at improving diet of young children are needed.
PubMed ID
23341402 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.