Skip header and navigation

Refine By

78 records – page 1 of 8.

[CHARACTERISTICS OF SANITARY AND HYGIENIC WORKING AND LIVING CONDITIONS AND MOBIDITY OF THE POPULATION OF TOFALARIIA.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62705
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1964;23:32-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1964

[Gösta Björkman, the general director: the health controls were obviously a mistake--we are going to make corrections]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62585
Source
Lakartidningen. 1973 Jan 17;70(3):197-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-1973
Author
B. Rennerstedt
Source
Lakartidningen. 1973 Jan 17;70(3):197-9
Date
Jan-17-1973
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food
Government Agencies
Health planning
Health Surveys
Legislation, Drug
Nutrition Surveys
State Medicine
Sweden
PubMed ID
4683437 View in PubMed
Less detail

Supplement use and nutritional habits in Norwegian elite athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52603
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1999 Feb;9(1):28-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
O. Ronsen
J. Sundgot-Borgen
S. Maehlum
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Sports Center, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1999 Feb;9(1):28-35
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skiing
Sports
Vitamins
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine nutritional and supplemental habits among international alpine- and cross-country skiers and power sport athletes in Norway. Data from all the athletes of the National alpine skiing team (ALP; n = 33, 19 men and 14 women) and the National cross-country skiing team (CRO; n = 34, 17 men and 17 women) plus a mixed group of power sport athletes (POW: n = 33, all men) from the National teams of boxers, weightlifters and track and field athletes, were collected through a semi-structured interview during their annual medical examination. Twenty percent of all the athletes reported unsatisfactory nutritional habits (CRO 6%, ALP 27% and POW 27%; CRO vs. ALP/POW P
PubMed ID
9974194 View in PubMed
Less detail

Results from a comparative dietary assessment in Europe: II. Feasibility of pooling individual-based dietary data between countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25517
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1989 Jun;43(6):379-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
J. Wahrendorf
H. Boeing
L. Heinemann
W. Kulesza
S L Rywik
M. Schroll
J. Sznajd
C. Thiel
Author Affiliation
German Cancer Research Center, Institute of Epidemiology and Biometry, Heidelberg.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1989 Jun;43(6):379-90
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Data Collection - methods
Europe
Food Habits
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Dietary investigations in four central European survey populations carried out in the German Democratic Republic, Poland and Denmark between 1982 and 1984 using different methodologies were analysed in order to assess the possibilities of characterizing the dietary habits of individual survey participants in a comparable fashion. This was done with the view of assessing the feasibility of a pooled cancer cohort study. For this purpose a method has been devised to combine dietary information derived by food frequency questionnaires and quantitative recording methods into a quantitative characterization of individuals' habits. A comparable characterization between different cultural settings could be demonstrated for a selected list of food items. The selection was determined by the food items considered in common in the different food frequency questionnaires and yielding sufficient and comparable variation as well as absolute amounts of intake. This was more clearly found for food items such as 'fruit' which experience a concise role in dietary habits. However, the observed discrepancies of the different dietary methods within the countries, and, most importantly, between the countries, result in distributions of average daily consumption values which are not deemed to be comparable.
PubMed ID
2743961 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 'Mini Nutritional Assessment' (MNA) and the 'Determine Your Nutritional Health' Checklist (NSI Checklist) as predictors of morbidity and mortality in an elderly Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61847
Source
Br J Nutr. 1999 Jan;81(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
A M Beck
L. Ovesen
M. Osler
Author Affiliation
Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Institute of Food Chemistry and Nutrition, Søborg, Denmark. BE@vfd.dk
Source
Br J Nutr. 1999 Jan;81(1):31-6
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Morbidity
Mortality
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the capacity of the 'Determine Your Nutritional Health' Checklist (NSI Checklist) and the 'Mini Nutritional Assessment' (MNA) methods to predict nutrition-related health problems. Data were from the Danish part of the 'Survey in Europe of Nutrition in the Elderly, a Concerted Action' (SENECA) baseline survey from 1988, and the follow-up study from 1993. Based on the baseline survey thirty-nine (19.3%) of the subjects were classified at high nutritional risk, 103 (51%) were considered at moderate nutritional risk and sixty (29.7%) were within the 'good' range according to the criteria in the NSI Checklist. With the MNA, 171 subjects were classified according to their nutritional risk into a well-nourished group, comprising 78.4%, and a group who were at risk of undernutrition, comprising 21.6% at baseline. A total of 115 subjects participated in the follow-up study. The mortality rate and the prevalence of various morbidity indicators were compared between the different risk groups. The analysis showed that subjects with a high MNA score (> or = 24) had significantly lower mortality (rate ratio estimate: 0.35; 95% Cl 0.18, 0.66) compared with subjects with a low MNA score (
PubMed ID
10341673 View in PubMed
Less detail

The American paradox: the role of energy-dense fat-reduced food in the increasing prevalence of obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61829
Source
Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 1998 Nov;1(6):573-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
A. Astrup
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition and LMC, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark. ast@kvl.dk
Source
Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 1998 Nov;1(6):573-7
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Fat-Restricted
Energy Intake - physiology
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Although surveys have reported that the fat content of the diet has decreased over past decades, the prevalence of obesity has continued to rise in Europe and North America. This phenomenon, 'the American paradox', has been attributed partly to an inability of the reduction in dietary fat to reduce excess body fat, and partly to the over-consumption of low-fat products, which, despite their reduced fat content, have in some cases been accused of maintaining a high energy density due to low fibre and water contents, and a high content of refined carbohydrates. In Denmark, the prevalence of obesity has increased in a period in which national dietary surveys have reported a reduction of more than 10% in dietary fat content. Analysing the Danish situation, it seems unlikely that the occurrence of the American paradox in Denmark is caused by the increased consumption of energy-dense, low-fat foods. Other explanations, e.g. the under-reporting of dietary fat in surveys and the clustering of obesity-promoting lifestyles in subgroups of the population, should be sought.
PubMed ID
10565412 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cross-cultural variations and changes in food-group intake among elderly women in Europe: results from the Survey in Europe on Nutrition and the Elderly a Concerted Action (SENECA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61939
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Apr;65(4 Suppl):1282S-1289S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
K. Schroll
O. Moreiras-Varela
D. Schlettwein-Gsell
B. Decarli
L. de Groot
W. van Staveren
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Wageningen Agricultural University, Netherlands.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Apr;65(4 Suppl):1282S-1289S
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Culture
Denmark
Diet
Energy intake
Female
Food
Humans
Netherlands
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spain
Switzerland
Abstract
To study cross-cultural variations and changes in intake of food groups in elderly Europeans, longitudinal data on food-group intake from Danish (n = 55), Dutch (n = 65), Swiss (n = 79), and Spanish (n = 46) female participants in the Survey in Europe on Nutrition and the Elderly a Concerted Action (SENECA) were compared. Participants were born between 1913 and 1918. Information on food intake was obtained with use of the same diet-history method at all sites and in both 1988-1989 and 1993. Actual food intake was coded according to the Eurocode system, the applicability of which for European multicenter studies was evaluated in this study. All participants, regardless of site, reported consumption of milk, grain products, and vegetables, and almost all ate meat, fats, and fruit. Fewer women ate eggs, fish, and sugar. The variations between the sites were in the food groups consumed and the types of foods within the groups. Spanish women appeared to have the most healthy food-intake pattern. They also had more changes in their dietary pattern than did women in the other countries. The Eurocode was adequate for describing the actual food intake of elderly women in four European towns. The coding for meat, however, was ambiguous and should be revised.
PubMed ID
9094934 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differences between participants and non-participants in a population study on nutrition and health in the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62161
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1992 Apr;46(4):289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
M. Osler
M. Schroll
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute of Clinical Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1992 Apr;46(4):289-95
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Selection Bias
Abstract
In November 1988 a random sample of 435 men and women aged 70-75 years from the general population in Roskilde, a provincial town in Denmark, were invited to participate in a study of nutrition and health. Forty-six per cent of the total sample agreed to participate. The total sample could be characterized by socio-economic variables and data on previous hospitalizations obtained from public registers. A subgroup of the non-participants could be further characterized by some of the topics under study using information obtained by telephone interviews. It was found that the non-participants differed from participants by selected health variables. More non-participants than participants had been hospitalized one year before contact. Telephone interviews with non-participants revealed generally poorer self-judged health and less-frequent eating of cooked meals compared with participants. The degree of bias introduced by this selectivity is estimated by weighting and by a minimum/maximum calculation. Review of participation in previous studies of nutrition and health in the elderly shows that problems with non-participation have been treated in various ways. It is concluded that consideration of factors discriminating between participants and non-participants is important for proper estimation of population parameters.
PubMed ID
1600926 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary knowledge and behaviour among schoolchildren in Copenhagen, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36239
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):135-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
M. Osler
E T Hansen
Author Affiliation
Regional Office of Health for the Copenhagen County, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):135-40
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Food Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Nutrition - education
Nutrition Surveys
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Urban Population
Abstract
In 1989, 674 schoolchildren aged 12-14 years in nine elementary schools in a municipality in Copenhagen, Denmark, answered a questionnaire about their dietary habits and knowledge. The majority of the pupils had fruit (87%), vegetables (72%), rye bread (81%), and drank fat-reduced milk (73%) every day. A diet score (reliability = 0.58) was calculated on the basis of the intake of 8 food items relevant to current dietary recommendations. There were no age and sex differences as to dietary habits, but immigrant children had a lower diet score than native children. Dietary knowledge was measured by the ability to state correctly whether 11 different food items had a high content or not of fat, sugar or dietary fibres. Dietary knowledge was highest for questions about fat and sugar. A knowledge score measured the number of correct answers to all 33 questions (reliability = 0.90). Knowledge was highest among older children, native children, and children with the most healthy dietary habits. In the multivariate regression analysis, knowledge, health attitudes and ethnicity were the only significant predictors of dietary behaviour. It is concluded that both social and personal factors are important for dietary behaviour, and health promotion in children should include other methods than educational programmes.
PubMed ID
8367681 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary intake among Norwegian adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50147
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1995 Aug;49(8):555-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
L F Andersen
M. Nes
B. Sandstad
G E Bjørneboe
C A Drevon
Author Affiliation
Section for Dietary Research, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1995 Aug;49(8):555-64
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutrition
Energy Metabolism
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the nationwide study on dietary behaviour of adolescents was to describe and evaluate dietary habits, and relate that to other lifestyle factors. DESIGN AND SUBJECT: 1564 students in secondary schools completed a self-administered quantitative food frequency questionnaire in a school setting. RESULTS: The questionnaire showed an average energy intake of 15.8 and 9.9 MJ among boys and girls, respectively. Nearly 31% of the energy was supplied by fat and 11.4% by sugar. The average daily intake of micronutrients exceeded the Norwegian recommendations, except for vitamin D and iron in girls. 13.4% of the students had breakfast twice a week or less. These students had a higher percentage of energy from fat and sugar, and a lower intake of micronutrients, than students eating breakfast more often. Students who were daily smokers or fairly inactive had higher energy percentage from fat and sugar and lower intake of fibre, than non-smokers or physically active students. CONCLUSION: Half of the students consumed a diet with too much fat and two-thirds consumed too much sugar as compared to the recommendations. The girls had a diet with a higher nutrient density and a lower fat energy percentage than the boys. Finally, it seemed as if a healthy lifestyle was associated with a healthy diet.
PubMed ID
7588506 View in PubMed
Less detail

78 records – page 1 of 8.