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The Tromsø Heart Study: comparison of information from a short food frequency questionnaire with a dietary history survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235878
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(1):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
B K Jacobsen
S F Knutsen
R. Knutsen
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(1):41-7
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Abstract
In a group of 528 men, 30-54 years old, answers to various questions about dietary habits given in a questionnaire were compared to corresponding information given in a dietary history interview two years later. High concordance was found between the two methods for questions concerning types of foods most commonly used. For most food items, the mean intake according to the dietary recall corresponds well with intake reported in the questionnaire. For food items used every day in easily recorded units (slices of bread, cups of coffee, glasses of milk), the frequency questionnaire can be used to rank individuals according to consumption. For other food items, the concordance is less satisfactory.
PubMed ID
3563440 View in PubMed
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[Nutritional habits of preschool children: an epidemiological study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255435
Source
Union Med Can. 1972 Jul;101(7):1316-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1972

Methodology in the collection of food consumption data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109702
Source
World Rev Nutr Diet. 1970;12:145-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970

Intake of energy and nutrients. Euronut SENECA investigators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11955
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Dec;45 Suppl 3:105-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
O. Moreiras
W A van Staveren
J A Cruz
M. Nes
K. Lund-Larsen
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Dec;45 Suppl 3:105-19
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cultural Characteristics
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
As part of the Euronut SENECA study, food consumption has been assessed in 1217 men and 1241 women, born between 1913 and 1918 and living in 18 towns in 12 European countries. The method used was a standardized modified dietary history, including a 3-day estimated record and a food frequency list based on local food patterns. Intakes of energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, fatty acids, cholesterol and alcohol are described in this paper. As expected, a difference between men and women in energy and nutrient intake was observed in all towns. There was a great variation between towns in mean dietary intakes of all dietary components. Mean energy intake of men ranged from 12.7 MJ in Marki (Poland) to 8.2 MJ in Yverdon (Switzerland) and Chateau Renault-Amboise (France). For women the range was from 10.9 MJ in Marki (Poland) to 6.3 MJ in Yverdon (Switzerland) and Vila Franca de Xira (Portugal). A geographical pattern can be detected for the intake of fatty acids. Intakes of saturated fat were lower in southern than in northern European towns. The calculated ratio for intakes of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids (polyunsaturated fatty acids plus monounsaturated fatty acids/saturated fatty acids) for all participants was higher in the southern European centres than in the northern centres and ranged from 2.7 in Markopoulo (Greece) to 1.2 in Elverum (Norway) and Marki (Poland). Alcohol consumption was considerable higher in men than in women. In men a north-south gradient in alcohol intake can be detected, with the highest intake in the two centres in Italy, where, on average 11% of energy intake was derived from alcohol.
PubMed ID
1809560 View in PubMed
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A comparison of dietary methods in epidemiologic studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248537
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1978 Jun;107(6):488-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
R W Morgan
M. Jain
A B Miller
N W Choi
V. Matthews
L. Munan
J D Burch
J. Feather
G R Howe
A. Kelly
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1978 Jun;107(6):488-98
Date
Jun-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Canada
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Methods
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Records as Topic
Abstract
Three methods of estimating group and individual dietary consumption have been developed and assessed in a case-control study of diet and breast cancer. The methods comprised a 24-hour recall, a detailed quantitative diet history directed to the most recent two-month period and the two-month period six months before, and a four-day diet diary. There is a high degree of correlation between the estimates of food consumption for the controls using each of the methods. The highest estimate was obtained from the diet history, with a slightly higher estimate in the period six months before than the current period, while the lowest is found in the 24-hour recall. The latter corresponds with the same method in a Nutrition Canada Survey. It is concluded that all methods ara applicable to case-control studies, but the diet history is preferred when current food intake may be influenced by a disease.
PubMed ID
665663 View in PubMed
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The reproducibility of dietary data from a self-administered questionnaire. The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228916
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1990 Jun;19(2):349-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
B K Jacobsen
K H Bønaa
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1990 Jun;19(2):349-53
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The reproducibility of a self-administered questionnaire about dietary habits was assessed by comparing answers from 201 men and women to identical questions posed in two surveys separated by approximately one year. In spite of possible changes in the diet in the time period between the two surveys, the concordance between the information was high, both concerning type of food item most commonly eaten and the frequency with which the food items were consumed. The highest reproducibility was found for food items consumed habitually (e.g. alcohol) or often (e.g. coffee). The results are in accordance with most other similar studies, and support the use of self-administered questionnaires in nutritional epidemiology.
PubMed ID
2376446 View in PubMed
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Variability in nutrient and food intakes among older middle-aged men. Implications for design of epidemiologic and validation studies using food recording.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228098
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Nov;132(5):999-1012
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
A M Hartman
C C Brown
J. Palmgren
P. Pietinen
M. Verkasalo
D. Myer
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Nov;132(5):999-1012
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diet
Diet Records
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Design
Seasons
Abstract
The authors conducted a dietary methodology study in 1984 in Finnish men aged 55-69 years in order to validate two dietary assessment instruments being used in the US-Finland Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Lung Cancer Prevention Trial. Twelve 2-day food records collected from 162 men over a 6-month period, including every day of the week, served as the reference measure. This report focuses on three important questions for investigating diet and disease relations: 1) How many days are necessary to classify "usual" intake? 2) Is there loss as a result of using consecutive days? 3) Which days are necessary for assessment and classification of "usual" diet? A repeated-measures regression model was used to estimate the variance components and the effects of consecutive days, weekday (weekday vs. weekend), and season. Correlations between the averages of different numbers of days of food records and "true" usual intake were examined along with the resulting attenuations in relative risk. Results suggest that 7-14 days are required to adequately classify most individuals into categories of intake for most nutrients and some foods. There appears to be some loss of information from using consecutive days rather than days further apart. Weekday/weekend differences in mean intakes are slight, and the rank ordering of individuals appears to be preserved. A moderate seasonal effect is shown for classification of fruits, but only a slight one is seen for micronutrients and berries. Implications for the design of epidemiologic and validation studies are discussed.
PubMed ID
2239915 View in PubMed
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Assessment of bias in the SENECA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61982
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996 Jul;50 Suppl 2:S4-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
M A van't Hof
J. Burema
Author Affiliation
MSA-KUN, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996 Jul;50 Suppl 2:S4-8
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Europe
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nutrition
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess manifest bias in ageing effects, i.e. longitudinal changes due to unintended time effects or to selection. DESIGN: Mixed-longitudinal study in birth cohorts 1913-1918, with baseline measurements taken in 1988/1989 and repeated in 1993, including a short questionnaire in non-responders. SETTING: Full baseline and follow-up data were collected in nine towns in eight European countries including Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland. Incomplete data were available from towns in Portugal, Poland, Northern Ireland and Connecticut, USA. SUBJECTS: Using standardized methodologies data were collected from a random age-stratified sample of elderly men and women, including a total of 1221 re-invited subjects from nine towns and 210 newly-invited subjects from three towns in 1993. RESULTS: An overall retrieval of 50-74% of the former participants could be reached in towns that had previously participated (apart from one exception of 41%), where estimates of mortality varied from 10% to 18%. There was a tendency for healthy and active persons to have a higher participation rate than others, as was the case for high educated newly-invited subjects compared to lower educational classes. For most of the variables used in the analysis of period effects, no evidence of any undesirable period effect was found. In those instances that period effects showed up to be statistically significant, coinciding implausible cohort effects gave the impression that these were due to instability of the estimation procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Non-participants may be less healthy and active than the participants. Only very limited unconvincing evidence to suggest unintended time effects was observed. This confirms the high standards of the methodology and of measurements.
PubMed ID
8841779 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with overweight and obesity in Mexican school-age children: results from the National Nutrition Survey 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181819
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S551-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Bernardo Hernández
Lucía Cuevas-Nasu
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Eric A Monterrubio
Claudia Ivonne Ramírez-Silva
Raquel García-Feregrino
Juan A Rivera
Jaime Sepúlveda-Amor
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Salud Poblacional, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad 655, colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. bhernand@correo.insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S551-7
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of the study was to measure the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Mexican school-age children (5-11 years) in the National Nutrition Survey 1999 (NNS-1999).
Overweight and obesity (defined as an excess of adipose tissue in the body) were evaluated through the Body Mass Index (BMI) in 10,901 children, using the standard proposed by the International Obesity Task Force. Sociodemographic variables were obtained using a questionnaire administered to the children's mothers.
The national prevalence of overweight and obesity was reported to be 19.5%. The highest prevalence figures were found in Mexico City (26.6%) and the North region (25.6%). When adjusting by region, rural or urban area, sex, maternal schooling, socioeconomic status, indigenous ethnicity and age, the highest prevalences of overweight and obesity were found among girls. The risks of overweight and obesity were positively associated with maternal schooling, children's age and socioeconomic status.
Overweight and obesity are prevalent health problems in Mexican school-age children, particularly among girls, and positively associated with socioeconomic status, age, and maternal schooling. This is a major public health problem requiring preventive interventions to avoid future health consequences. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.
PubMed ID
14746049 View in PubMed
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84 records – page 1 of 9.