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Anemia in Mexican women: a public health problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181821
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S499-507
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Salvador Villalpando
Juan A Rivera
Fabiola Mejía-Rodríguez
Martha Camacho-Cisneros
Eric A Monterrubio
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Departamento de Vigilancia de la Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad 655, colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. tshamah@correo.insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S499-507
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anemia - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Mexico - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Public Health
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence and distribution of anemia among women of childbearing age (12 to 49 years) participating in the 1999 National Nutrition Survey (NNS-1999).
The survey had a probabilistic design and was representative at the national level, of urban and rural areas and four regions: North, South, Center, and Mexico City. Hemoglobin concentration was determined in capillary blood samples using a portable photometer (HemoCue), in 17,194 women, 697 of whom were pregnant.
The overall prevalence of anemia was 27.8% in pregnant women and 20.8% in non-pregnant women. Higher prevalences were observed in rural as compared to urban areas, both in pregnant (28.0% vs 27.7%) and non-pregnant (22.6% vs 20.0%) women, but the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Women in the South had the greatest prevalence (23.2%), followed by those in the North (20.9%), Center (20.6%), and Mexico City (16.4%). Non-pregnant indigenous women had a prevalence of 24.8%, while in-non-indigenous women the prevalence was 20.4%.
Anemia in women of childbearing age is a growing public health problem that justifies the implementation of interventions for its prevention and control. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.
PubMed ID
14746044 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with overweight and obesity in Mexican school-age children: results from the National Nutrition Survey 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181819
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S551-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Bernardo Hernández
Lucía Cuevas-Nasu
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Eric A Monterrubio
Claudia Ivonne Ramírez-Silva
Raquel García-Feregrino
Juan A Rivera
Jaime Sepúlveda-Amor
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Salud Poblacional, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad 655, colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. bhernand@correo.insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S551-7
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of the study was to measure the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Mexican school-age children (5-11 years) in the National Nutrition Survey 1999 (NNS-1999).
Overweight and obesity (defined as an excess of adipose tissue in the body) were evaluated through the Body Mass Index (BMI) in 10,901 children, using the standard proposed by the International Obesity Task Force. Sociodemographic variables were obtained using a questionnaire administered to the children's mothers.
The national prevalence of overweight and obesity was reported to be 19.5%. The highest prevalence figures were found in Mexico City (26.6%) and the North region (25.6%). When adjusting by region, rural or urban area, sex, maternal schooling, socioeconomic status, indigenous ethnicity and age, the highest prevalences of overweight and obesity were found among girls. The risks of overweight and obesity were positively associated with maternal schooling, children's age and socioeconomic status.
Overweight and obesity are prevalent health problems in Mexican school-age children, particularly among girls, and positively associated with socioeconomic status, age, and maternal schooling. This is a major public health problem requiring preventive interventions to avoid future health consequences. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.
PubMed ID
14746049 View in PubMed
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Contrasting Patterns for Missing Third Molars in the United States and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285379
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Jun;75(6):1113-1117
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Caitlin B L Magraw
Lars Pallesen
Kevin L Moss
Elda L Fisher
Steven Offenbacher
Raymond P White
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Jun;75(6):1113-1117
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Molar, Third - anatomy & histology
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Sweden
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of third molars from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the Swedish survey.
This cross-sectional study involved the comparison of the only published data on third molar prevalence. The number of visible third molars in the NHANES of 2011 through 2012 were assessed in nonclinical settings by trained, calibrated dental hygienists and reported by age decade (approximately 5,000 patients). Similar data were reported for the Swedish population with data collected in clinical settings (approximately 700 patients). The primary outcome variable was the number of third molars (0 to 4); the predictor variables were age cohorts (20 to 29 through 70 to 79 yr). Outcome data were reported with descriptive statistics.
In the youngest cohort (20 to 29 yr), having no visible third molars was more likely in the US population than in the Swedish population (47 vs 2%, respectively). By 50 to 59 years, outcomes for no third molars were similar in the United States and Sweden (53 and 57%, respectively).
The presence or absence of third molars reported from the US and Swedish populations presented contrasting patterns, particularly in the younger cohorts. More comprehensive and detailed data are required in future surveys as population studies on third molars become more important for clinicians and other stakeholders.
PubMed ID
28219629 View in PubMed
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Hypertension in children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155719
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Aug 12;179(4):343-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-12-2008
Author
Arianna Bocelli
Piercarlo Ballo
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Aug 12;179(4):343-4
Date
Aug-12-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
United States - epidemiology
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2004 May 5;291(17):2107-1315126439
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jul 9;290(2):199-20612851274
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 May 20;178(11):1429-3518490638
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Jan 15-21;365(9455):217-2315652604
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Sep 25;116(13):1488-9617846287
Comment On: CMAJ. 2008 May 20;178(11):1429-3518490638
PubMed ID
18695187 View in PubMed
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The American paradox: the role of energy-dense fat-reduced food in the increasing prevalence of obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61829
Source
Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 1998 Nov;1(6):573-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
A. Astrup
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition and LMC, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark. ast@kvl.dk
Source
Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 1998 Nov;1(6):573-7
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Fat-Restricted
Energy Intake - physiology
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Although surveys have reported that the fat content of the diet has decreased over past decades, the prevalence of obesity has continued to rise in Europe and North America. This phenomenon, 'the American paradox', has been attributed partly to an inability of the reduction in dietary fat to reduce excess body fat, and partly to the over-consumption of low-fat products, which, despite their reduced fat content, have in some cases been accused of maintaining a high energy density due to low fibre and water contents, and a high content of refined carbohydrates. In Denmark, the prevalence of obesity has increased in a period in which national dietary surveys have reported a reduction of more than 10% in dietary fat content. Analysing the Danish situation, it seems unlikely that the occurrence of the American paradox in Denmark is caused by the increased consumption of energy-dense, low-fat foods. Other explanations, e.g. the under-reporting of dietary fat in surveys and the clustering of obesity-promoting lifestyles in subgroups of the population, should be sought.
PubMed ID
10565412 View in PubMed
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[The effect of nutritional characteristics on the prevalence of dyslipoproteinemia and ischemic heart disease among the inhabitants of the city of Kiev]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55222
Source
Vrach Delo. 1991 Oct;(10):46-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1991
Author
N V Davydenko
Source
Vrach Delo. 1991 Oct;(10):46-9
Date
Oct-1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Hyperlipoproteinemia - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Results of an epidemiological investigation of a non-organized population of males at the age of 29-52 years in the city of Kiev revealed in 22.4% dyslipoproteinemia. Feeding of the population and its relationship to disorders of the lipid metabolism were evaluated. Dietary recommendations and primary prophylaxis of ischemic heart disease are discussed.
PubMed ID
1803745 View in PubMed
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Survey of current vitamin D food fortification practices in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119420
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2013 Jul;136:211-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Mona S Calvo
Susan J Whiting
Author Affiliation
Office of Applied Research and Safety Assessment, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services, 8301 Muirkirk Road, Laurel, MD 20708, USA. mona.calvo@fda.hhs.gov
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2013 Jul;136:211-3
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Food, Fortified
Humans
Legislation, Food - trends
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
United States - epidemiology
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
Widespread poor vitamin D status in all age and gender groups in the United States (USA) and Canada increases the need for new food sources. Currently ~60% of the intake of vitamin D from foods is from fortified foods in these countries. Those groups in greatest need are consuming significantly lower amounts of commonly fortified foods such as milk. Both countries allow voluntary vitamin D fortification of some other foods, although in Canada this practice is only done on a case-by-case basis. Novel approaches to vitamin D fortification of food in both countries now include "bio-addition" in which food staples are fortified through the addition of another vitamin D-rich food to animal feed during production, or manipulation of food post-harvest or pre-processing. These bio-addition approaches provide a wider range of foods containing vitamin D, and thus appeal to differing preferences, cultures and possibly economic status. An example is the post-harvest exposure of edible mushrooms to ultraviolet light. However, further research into safety and efficacy of bio-addition needs to be established in different target populations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'.
PubMed ID
23104118 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of overweight and obesity in school-aged children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167526
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006;67(3):125-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Meizi He
Charlene Beynon
Author Affiliation
Public Health Research, Education and Development Program, Middlesex-London Health Unit, Brescia University College, London, Ontario.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006;67(3):125-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Child
Child Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Public Health
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Childhood obesity is a public health concern in Canada. Few published anthropometric data are available to indicate obesity prevalence in Canadian children. Obesity prevalence is reported for school-aged children in 11 London, Ontario, schools.
Data on body weight and height were obtained using standardized procedures. United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) body mass index (BMI)-for-age references and Cole's international BMI reference were used to classify the children's weight categories.
The study included 1,570 pupils aged six to 13. The CDC BMI references categorized 16.6% and 11.8% of children as overweight and obese, respectively. In comparison, when the Cole BMI reference and cut-off points were used, 17.5% and 7.6% of children were classified as overweight and obese, respectively.
Overweight is prevalent in the study population. Public health interventions are warranted to curb the obesity epidemic in school-aged children.
PubMed ID
16968560 View in PubMed
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Dietary trend and diabetes: its association among indigenous Fijians 1952 to 1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192526
Source
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2001;10(3):183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J V Lako
Author Affiliation
Food and Textiles Department, School of Applied Sciences, The University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji. lako_j@usp.ac.fj
Source
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2001;10(3):183-7
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Culture
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Diet - trends
Female
Fiji - epidemiology
Food Habits
Food Supply
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Abstract
The dietary trends of indigenous Fijians have changed drastically in the past 50 years. Deviating from the traditional food consumption pattern and traditional lifestyle may have increased the incidence and prevalence of non-communicable diseases. The aim of this study is to examine the dietary trends of the indigenous Fijians in relation to the prevalence of diabetes from 1952 to 1994. The data used were obtained from the Naduri Nutrition Survey reports of 1952 to 1994, the Fiji National Nutrition Survey reports of 1983 and 1993, and the two diabetes survey reports of 1965 and 1980. Results indicated an increased consumption of introduced foods, which may be associated with an increased prevalence of diabetes. The total energy derived from cereals and sugar increased dramatically with a reduction in consumption of traditional foods. The prevalence of diabetes among the urban indigenous population in 1965 was very low compared to the 1980 figure, while the National Nutrition Survey of the same ethnic group showed a 433% increase of urban diabetes from 1965 to 1993. The hospital diabetes admission cases of 1952 to 1982 also showed an increased trend.
PubMed ID
11708305 View in PubMed
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Nutrition needs assessment of young Special Olympics participants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130385
Source
J Intellect Dev Disabil. 2011 Dec;36(4):264-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Jennifer C Gibson
Viviene A Temple
Jane P Anholt
Catherine A Gaul
Author Affiliation
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. jcgibson@uvic.ca
Source
J Intellect Dev Disabil. 2011 Dec;36(4):264-8
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Child
Child Nutrition Disorders - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Male
Needs Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Sports
Abstract
Children with intellectual disability (ID) are at increased risk for obesity and nutrition-related health concerns, yet there is a paucity of data describing their nutrition status. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nutritional challenges of young participants (2?10 years of age) enrolled in Special Olympics Canada (SOC) programs.
A validated nutrition screening tool was mailed to 52 parents/caregivers of participants across 18 SOC programs in British Columbia, Canada.
Of the 29 (55.8%) questionnaires returned, 62.1% scored as "high" nutrition risk. Nutrition concerns included feeding (84.2%), oral motor (57.9%), and dental problems (26.3%), food allergies/intolerances (26.3%), constipation (15.8%), anaemia (10.3%), and diarrhoea (5.3%). Body mass index (BMI) for age data classified 16.7% of participants as overweight/obese and 22.2% as underweight.
This study identifies some of the unique nutrition issues faced by children with ID. These data can help inform future ID health-related nutrition, prevention, and treatment programs.
PubMed ID
22007752 View in PubMed
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53 records – page 1 of 6.