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Variability in nutrient and food intakes among older middle-aged men. Implications for design of epidemiologic and validation studies using food recording.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228098
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Nov;132(5):999-1012
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
A M Hartman
C C Brown
J. Palmgren
P. Pietinen
M. Verkasalo
D. Myer
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Nov;132(5):999-1012
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diet
Diet Records
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Design
Seasons
Abstract
The authors conducted a dietary methodology study in 1984 in Finnish men aged 55-69 years in order to validate two dietary assessment instruments being used in the US-Finland Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Lung Cancer Prevention Trial. Twelve 2-day food records collected from 162 men over a 6-month period, including every day of the week, served as the reference measure. This report focuses on three important questions for investigating diet and disease relations: 1) How many days are necessary to classify "usual" intake? 2) Is there loss as a result of using consecutive days? 3) Which days are necessary for assessment and classification of "usual" diet? A repeated-measures regression model was used to estimate the variance components and the effects of consecutive days, weekday (weekday vs. weekend), and season. Correlations between the averages of different numbers of days of food records and "true" usual intake were examined along with the resulting attenuations in relative risk. Results suggest that 7-14 days are required to adequately classify most individuals into categories of intake for most nutrients and some foods. There appears to be some loss of information from using consecutive days rather than days further apart. Weekday/weekend differences in mean intakes are slight, and the rank ordering of individuals appears to be preserved. A moderate seasonal effect is shown for classification of fruits, but only a slight one is seen for micronutrients and berries. Implications for the design of epidemiologic and validation studies are discussed.
PubMed ID
2239915 View in PubMed
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Sodium food sources in the Canadian diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147182
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Oct;34(5):884-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Peter W F Fischer
Michel Vigneault
Rong Huang
Konstantinia Arvaniti
Paula Roach
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Nutritional Sciences, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. pfischer@xplornet.com
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Oct;34(5):884-92
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet Records
Female
Food analysis
Food Habits
Humans
Infant
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Sodium, Dietary - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to provide information on the current sources of dietary sodium in the Canadian food supply to provide a baseline to measure against the effectiveness of strategies to reduce salt consumption. Such strategies are being developed by a Health Canada-led multistakeholder Working Group. Data from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2.2, Nutrition, were used to determine the leading food group contributors of sodium in the diet. The total sample size was more than 35,000 respondents. The results from this study were reported for 4 age and sex groups, namely, youths aged 1 to 8 years, youths aged 9 to 18 years, males aged 19 years and older, and females aged 19 years and older. Average daily intakes of sodium for these groups were 2388 mg, 3412 mg, 3587 mg, and 2684 mg, respectively. In all cases these intakes exceeded the tolerable upper intake level (UL) established by the Institute of Medicine, as well as targets set by the governments of the United Kingdom and the United States and the World Health Organization. The contribution of sodium to the food supply by the top 40 food groups is presented for each of the age and sex groups. The key food group contributors of sodium are breads (13.88%), processed meats (8.90%), and pasta dishes (5.67%). Although breads are found to be major contributors of sodium, this is mainly because of the large consumption, rather than a high concentration of sodium. Higher-sodium foods, such as processed meats, are eaten in smaller quantities but, because of their sodium density, contribute significant amounts of sodium to the diet of Canadians. Some very high sodium foods, such as frozen dinners, are eaten by only a small proportion of the population, but for those consuming these, the sodium could contribute a significant proportion of the UL just from a single meal.
PubMed ID
19935850 View in PubMed
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[Development of a method of studying actual nutrition according to analysis of the frequency of consumption of food products: creation of a questionnaire and general evaluation of the reliability of the method].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204476
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1998;(3):8-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
A N Martinchik
A K Baturin
V S Baeva
A I Feoktistova
I N Piatnitskaia
G A Azizbekian
E V Peskova
E A Bormacheva
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1998;(3):8-13
Date
1998
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Records
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The method of actual feeding evaluation on frequency of food-stuffs consumption was developed. The method of 24-hour reproduction of a feed and the method of consumed food registration in a diary by testing person himself. The main results of study testified to reliability of data, received by a developed method.
PubMed ID
9752664 View in PubMed
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Dietary exposure to acrylamide in adolescents from a Canadian urban center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115342
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Jul;57:75-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Louise Normandin
Michèle Bouchard
Pierre Ayotte
Carole Blanchet
Adam Becalski
Yvette Bonvalot
Denise Phaneuf
Caroline Lapointe
Michelle Gagné
Marilène Courteau
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Jul;57:75-83
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - toxicity
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Food Analysis - methods
Food Contamination
Food Handling - methods
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Solanum tuberosum
Urban Population
Abstract
The distribution of acrylamide in food items frequently consumed by Canadian adolescents was determined along with estimates of their contribution to the overall dietary intake of acrylamide. A total of 196 non-smoking adolescents (10-17 years old) were recruited in Montreal Island population, Canada. Participants were invited to fill out a 2-day food diary and a food frequency questionnaire over the last month. 146 samples of foods most frequently consumed by participants were analyzed for acrylamide contents. The highest acrylamide contents were measured in deep-fried french fries and potato chips (mean ± SD: 1053 ± 657 and 524 ± 276 ng/g respectively). On the basis of the 2-day food diary, median total daily intake of acrylamide was estimated at 0.29 µg/kg bw/d, as compared to 0.17 µg/kg bw/d on the basis of the food frequency questionnaire. These values are similar to those reported in comparable populations. Deep-fried french fries consumption contributed the most to daily acrylamide intake (50%) followed by potato chips (10%), oven-baked french fries (8%) and breakfast cereals (8%). Margins of exposure based on genotoxic benchmark dose limits were estimated to be low (˜
PubMed ID
23517909 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns associated with glycemic index and glycemic load among Alberta adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148454
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Aug;34(4):648-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Laura E Forbes
Kate E Storey
Shawn N Fraser
John C Spence
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Kim D Raine
Rhona M Hanning
Linda J McCargar
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2P5, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Aug;34(4):648-58
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alberta
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body Weight
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Records
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Glycemic Index
Humans
Internet
Male
Mental Recall
Nutrition Surveys
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of adolescents, based on a Web-based 24-h recall, and to investigate dietary predictors of GI and GL. In addition, the relationship between GI and GL and weight status was examined. A Web-based 24-h recall was completed by 4936 adolescents, aged 9-17 years; macronutrient and food group intakes were assessed using the ESHA Food Processor, the Canadian Nutrient File, and Canada's Food Guide. Dietary GI and GL were calculated based on published GI values for foods. Students provided self-reported height and mass. Multiple regression models assessed the ability of food group choices and food behaviours to predict GI and GL. Mean GI was 55 for girls and 56 for boys. Mean GL was 128 for girls and 168 for boys. Food group choices explained 26% of the variation in GI (p
PubMed ID
19767800 View in PubMed
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Under-reporting of energy intake in the Canadian Community Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152558
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):37-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Didier Garriguet
Author Affiliation
Health Information and Research Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6. didier.garriguet@statcan.gc.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):37-45
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Diet
Diet Records
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Exercise
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Risk factors
Self Disclosure
Young Adult
Abstract
Under-reporting of food consumption is a recurrent challenge for nutrition surveys. Past research suggests that under-reporting tends to be most pronounced among overweight and obese people.
Data from 16,190 respondents to the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS 2.2)-Nutrition were used to estimate underreporting of food intake for the population aged 12 or older in the 10 provinces. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess the impact of different characteristics on underreporting.
Average under-reporting of energy intake was estimated at 10%. Under-reporting was greater among people who were overweight or obese, those who were physically active, adults compared with teenagers, and women compared with men.
Under-reporting of energy intake is not random and varies by key health determinants. Awareness of the characteristics associated with under-reporting is important for users of nutrition data from the CCHS 2.2.
PubMed ID
19226926 View in PubMed
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Analysis of 24-hour recalls of 164 fourth- to sixth-grade Mohawk children in Kahnawake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205123
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Jul;98(7):814-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998

The Malmö Food Study: validity of two dietary assessment methods for measuring nutrient intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61963
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997;26 Suppl 1:S161-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
E. Riboli
S. Elmståhl
R. Saracci
B. Gullberg
F. Lindgärde
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997;26 Suppl 1:S161-73
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anthropometry
Comparative Study
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen - urine
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Nutritional epidemiology relies largely on dietary assessment methods for the estimation of the "exposure' variables which may be related to disease risk. METHODS: This paper describes a methodological study conducted in Malm?, Sweden, to compare nutrient intake--estimated by two alternative dietary assessment methods--with a reference method consisting of 18 days of weighed food records. The two candidate methods were an extensive food frequency questionnaire with portion size to be estimated from a booklet of 120 sets of photos (method A) and a method involving the combination of a shorter questionnaire and a two-week food record (method B). RESULTS: In absolute values, both methods overestimated nutrient intake by 20-40%, with method B closer to the reference for most nutrients. Both crude and energy-adjusted correlations between A-reference and B-reference were of the order of 0.50-0.60 for energy, energy-providing nutrients and most vitamins and minerals. Correlations were in the same range for most of the 14 fatty acids considered in the analyses. Protein intake, estimated from the analyses of urinary nitrogen on 6-8 repeated 24-hour urine collections per subject, was almost identical to the reference method values. Correlation between nitrogen-derived values and dietary measurement was 0.75. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the study indicated that both methods A and B had good ranking validity compared to the reference and that in most cases the combined method (B) performed slightly better than the extensive food frequency method (A).
PubMed ID
9126544 View in PubMed
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Development of a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire to assess food, energy and nutrient intake in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24666
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;20(4):900-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
J. Haraldsdóttir
M. Ewertz
O M Jensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social Medicine, University of Arhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;20(4):900-5
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Foods to be included in a Danish self-administered semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire were identified from food tables developed, together with data collected, for the survey 'Dietary habits in Denmark, 1985'. The questionnaire was to be used in a prospective study on diet, cancer and health, and the aim was to rank individuals with regard to intake of 19 different nutrients considered of prime importance in human carcinogenesis. The questionnaire for the dietary survey included 247 foods and recipes. From stepwise multiple regression analyses with the intake of each of the 19 nutrients as the dependent variable and the intake of the 247 foods and recipes as independent variables, the foods in the models explaining 90% of the between-person variability were considered for the final questionnaire. All relevant analyses were performed for the study group as a whole, for men and women separately, and in each gender for subgroups of energy intake. Taken together, the models explaining 90% of the between-person variability identified a total of 74 foods or recipes, which were important predictors of the intake of one or more of the nutrients considered. A few foods were excluded and a few foods were added to the final questionnaire based on common biological background information, and on information on foods providing important amounts of given nutrients, but which failed to contribute to regression analyses. The 92 foods and recipes, which were included in the final questionnaire provided altogether 81% of the average total supply of the nutrients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1800428 View in PubMed
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Zinc intake, zinc status and growth in a longitudinal study of healthy Danish infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59359
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Nov;83(11):1115-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
K F Michaelsen
G. Samuelson
T W Graham
B. Lönnerdal
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Nov;83(11):1115-21
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Deficiency Diseases - blood - complications - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Records
Growth Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutrition Disorders - blood - complications - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Zinc - blood - deficiency
Abstract
Mild, growth-limiting zinc deficiency might be prevalent in otherwise healthy infants according to recent studies. We examined zinc intake and status in 91 healthy term infants from birth to 12 months, as part of the Copenhagen Cohort Study on Infant Nutrition and Growth. Zinc intake was recorded monthly and the amount of zinc absorbed was estimated. These estimates were below recently published FAO/WHO/IAEA values for basal requirements in 68%, 62% and 14% of the infants at 2, 4 and 9 months of age, respectively. Serum zinc decreased significantly (p
PubMed ID
7841721 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.