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76 records – page 1 of 8.

[Validity of a dietary survey in adiposity]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62279
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Oct 3;150(40):2417
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1988
Author
A. Astrup
O J Victor
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Oct 3;150(40):2417
Date
Oct-3-1988
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diet Surveys
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity
PubMed ID
3206629 View in PubMed
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[Is there enough protein in the Norwegian diet?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62437
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1979 Aug 20;99(23):1096-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1979
Author
G. Booten
A. Haug
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1979 Aug 20;99(23):1096-8
Date
Aug-20-1979
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet Surveys
Dietary Proteins
English Abstract
Humans
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
PubMed ID
531796 View in PubMed
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The Tromsø Heart Study: comparison of information from a short food frequency questionnaire with a dietary history survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235878
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(1):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
B K Jacobsen
S F Knutsen
R. Knutsen
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(1):41-7
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Abstract
In a group of 528 men, 30-54 years old, answers to various questions about dietary habits given in a questionnaire were compared to corresponding information given in a dietary history interview two years later. High concordance was found between the two methods for questions concerning types of foods most commonly used. For most food items, the mean intake according to the dietary recall corresponds well with intake reported in the questionnaire. For food items used every day in easily recorded units (slices of bread, cups of coffee, glasses of milk), the frequency questionnaire can be used to rank individuals according to consumption. For other food items, the concordance is less satisfactory.
PubMed ID
3563440 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake of a group of chronic geriatric psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243652
Source
Gerontology. 1982;28(4):245-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

A comparison of dietary methods in epidemiologic studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248537
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1978 Jun;107(6):488-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
R W Morgan
M. Jain
A B Miller
N W Choi
V. Matthews
L. Munan
J D Burch
J. Feather
G R Howe
A. Kelly
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1978 Jun;107(6):488-98
Date
Jun-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Canada
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Methods
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Records as Topic
Abstract
Three methods of estimating group and individual dietary consumption have been developed and assessed in a case-control study of diet and breast cancer. The methods comprised a 24-hour recall, a detailed quantitative diet history directed to the most recent two-month period and the two-month period six months before, and a four-day diet diary. There is a high degree of correlation between the estimates of food consumption for the controls using each of the methods. The highest estimate was obtained from the diet history, with a slightly higher estimate in the period six months before than the current period, while the lowest is found in the 24-hour recall. The latter corresponds with the same method in a Nutrition Canada Survey. It is concluded that all methods ara applicable to case-control studies, but the diet history is preferred when current food intake may be influenced by a disease.
PubMed ID
665663 View in PubMed
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The reproducibility of dietary data from a self-administered questionnaire. The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228916
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1990 Jun;19(2):349-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
B K Jacobsen
K H Bønaa
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1990 Jun;19(2):349-53
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The reproducibility of a self-administered questionnaire about dietary habits was assessed by comparing answers from 201 men and women to identical questions posed in two surveys separated by approximately one year. In spite of possible changes in the diet in the time period between the two surveys, the concordance between the information was high, both concerning type of food item most commonly eaten and the frequency with which the food items were consumed. The highest reproducibility was found for food items consumed habitually (e.g. alcohol) or often (e.g. coffee). The results are in accordance with most other similar studies, and support the use of self-administered questionnaires in nutritional epidemiology.
PubMed ID
2376446 View in PubMed
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The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure in community resident homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93642
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 May;17(9):1211-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Wikby Kerstin
Ek Anna-Christina
Christensson Lennart
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University College of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. kerstin.wikby@telia.com
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 May;17(9):1211-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Residential Facilities
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVITIES: The aims were to test internal consistency and interrater reliability of Mini Nutritional Assessment during implementation of Mini Nutritional Assessment in community residential homes and to test sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic predictivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form vs. Mini Nutritional Assessment. BACKGROUND: There is a need in clinical practice to assess nutritional status in older people and to identify those who could benefit from early intervention. METHODS: The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure (Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form and Mini Nutritional Assessment) was used in 127 older people admitted to eight residential homes. In three of those homes (A, B and C), registered nurses simultaneously performed the assessment procedure, after receiving education and training. The intention was to offer the registered nurses a tool for independent practice use. RESULTS: Internal consistency was 0.68 (Cronbach's alpha) (n = 127). In residential home A, B and C, the registered nurses carried out Mini Nutritional Assessment in 45 residents out of 68. The agreement level between the author's and the registered nurses' assessments was 62% (kappa 0.41). In residential home A, B and C, the agreement level was 89%, 89% and 44%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic predictivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form vs. Mini Nutritional Assessment were 89%, 82% and 92%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure seems to be a useful tool to identify residents in need of nutritional interventions, despite the registered nurses not carrying out Mini Nutritional Assessment in all residents and the low agreement in residential home C. It indicates that to implement and use Mini Nutritional Assessment in nursing care demands the creating necessary staff resources, such as adequate staffing, sufficient education and continual supervision. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Because of the high sensitivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form and Mini Nutritional Assessment, Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form alone might be sufficient for practice use, as its simplicity might increase its usefulness.
PubMed ID
18266849 View in PubMed
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Fibre and nutrient intakes of chronic care elderly patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216157
Source
J Nutr Elder. 1995;15(1):13-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
L J McCargar
B L Hotson
A. Nozza
Source
J Nutr Elder. 1995;15(1):13-30
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Dietary Fiber
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Manitoba
Nutrition Surveys
Quebec
Abstract
It has been previously suggested that chronic care elderly patients are at increased nutritional risk. However dietary intake studies have not completely supported this statement. To determine usual dietary intakes, 32 elderly patients, mean (+/- SEM) age 84 +/- 1 years, from two hospitals, had 3-day dietary intakes estimated or weighed and analyzed for nutrient composition. The group as a whole had low intakes of dietary fibre but intakes of other nutrients were equal to or greater than the Canadian recommendations. The distribution of macronutrients also met recommended guidelines. In general, this group of elderly patients appeared to be eating well, however, some individuals results suggest nutritional risk.
PubMed ID
8715451 View in PubMed
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[Hygienic characteristics of the diet of the original inhabitants of the Nenetsk national district]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42301
Source
Gig Sanit. 1976 May;(5):111-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1976

Evaluation of a diet history questionnaire for epidemiologic studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246116
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1980 Feb;111(2):212-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1980
Author
M. Jain
G R Howe
K C Johnson
A B Miller
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1980 Feb;111(2):212-9
Date
Feb-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Epidemiologic Methods
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Ontario
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study was conducted to evaluate a detailed diet history questionnaire. Diet histories obtained from 16 men were compared with food records kept by their partners for a 30-day period. Mean estimates for all 13 nutrients calculated were higher with the diet history than with food records. Positive correlation coefficients were found between estimates from the two methods for all nutrients as well as food groups and six of the 13 nutrients gave a good fit for the corresponding regression equations. The questionnaire was also evaluated by repeating it after six months on 26 case-control pairs of an ongoing diet and cancer study. High correlation coefficients were obtained for most nutrients for the controls. However, cases showed lower correlations probably due to changes in their diet. The study found that the diet history method as an estimate of dietary patterns among groups shows sufficient validity and reliability to make it a useful instrument for epidemiologic studies.
PubMed ID
7355883 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.