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Fibre and nutrient intakes of chronic care elderly patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216157
Source
J Nutr Elder. 1995;15(1):13-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
L J McCargar
B L Hotson
A. Nozza
Source
J Nutr Elder. 1995;15(1):13-30
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Dietary Fiber
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Manitoba
Nutrition Surveys
Quebec
Abstract
It has been previously suggested that chronic care elderly patients are at increased nutritional risk. However dietary intake studies have not completely supported this statement. To determine usual dietary intakes, 32 elderly patients, mean (+/- SEM) age 84 +/- 1 years, from two hospitals, had 3-day dietary intakes estimated or weighed and analyzed for nutrient composition. The group as a whole had low intakes of dietary fibre but intakes of other nutrients were equal to or greater than the Canadian recommendations. The distribution of macronutrients also met recommended guidelines. In general, this group of elderly patients appeared to be eating well, however, some individuals results suggest nutritional risk.
PubMed ID
8715451 View in PubMed
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Effect of prefracture versus postfracture dietary assessment on hip fracture risk estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61995
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Apr;25(2):403-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
K. Michaelsson
L. Holmberg
S. Ljunghall
H. Mallmin
P G Persson
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Central Hospital, 721 89 Vasteras, Sweden. The Study Group of the Multiple Risk Survey on Swedish Women for eating Assessment (MRS SWEA).
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Apr;25(2):403-10
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Dietary factors are presumed to have influence on bone mass and hence fracture susceptibility. Most information in this respect is based on retrospective assessment of previous dietary habits. In a population-based case-control study nested within a cohort, we collected dietary information both before and after a first hip fracture. Thus it was possible to study reported changes in dietary habits, intentional as well as unintentional, among hip fracture patients after a first hip fracture and to compare postfracture with prefracture dietary information. METHODS. More than 65 000 women born 1914-1948 in two counties in central Sweden completed a food frequency questionnaire regarding their usual current dietary habits, before attending a mammographic screening between the years 1987 and 1990. Subsequently 123 of them sustained a first hip fracture and were defined as cases in the present study. For every case, one control, individually matched by age and county of residence, was selected from the cohort. A second identical food frequency questionnaire was mailed to both cases and controls on average 2 years after the hip fracture event. In total 98 case/control pairs could be included in the analysis. The association between diet and hip fracture was evaluated and the results from the two dietary assessments were contrasted. Women who themselves claimed that they had not changed their diet in recent years were analysed separately. RESULTS. The hip fracture cases, compared with the controls, had reduced their reported dietary intake of dairy products after the fracture. Apparently this was not intentional since this effect was more pronounced among those cases who claimed that their diet was unchanged. The changes were most apparent among the younger cases with a more recent hip fracture and with a body mass index above the median. Half of the cases, more than twice the frequency in controls, who were initially classified as having high intake of dairy products were classified as having low intake (
PubMed ID
9119567 View in PubMed
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Development of a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire to assess food, energy and nutrient intake in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24666
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;20(4):900-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
J. Haraldsdóttir
M. Ewertz
O M Jensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social Medicine, University of Arhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;20(4):900-5
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Foods to be included in a Danish self-administered semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire were identified from food tables developed, together with data collected, for the survey 'Dietary habits in Denmark, 1985'. The questionnaire was to be used in a prospective study on diet, cancer and health, and the aim was to rank individuals with regard to intake of 19 different nutrients considered of prime importance in human carcinogenesis. The questionnaire for the dietary survey included 247 foods and recipes. From stepwise multiple regression analyses with the intake of each of the 19 nutrients as the dependent variable and the intake of the 247 foods and recipes as independent variables, the foods in the models explaining 90% of the between-person variability were considered for the final questionnaire. All relevant analyses were performed for the study group as a whole, for men and women separately, and in each gender for subgroups of energy intake. Taken together, the models explaining 90% of the between-person variability identified a total of 74 foods or recipes, which were important predictors of the intake of one or more of the nutrients considered. A few foods were excluded and a few foods were added to the final questionnaire based on common biological background information, and on information on foods providing important amounts of given nutrients, but which failed to contribute to regression analyses. The 92 foods and recipes, which were included in the final questionnaire provided altogether 81% of the average total supply of the nutrients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1800428 View in PubMed
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Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 1997;1(3):151-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
A. Haveman-Nies
L C de Groot
W A Van Staveren
Author Affiliation
Sub-department of Human Nutrition and Epidemiology, Wageningen Agricultural University, The Netherlands.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 1997;1(3):151-5
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Dehydration - metabolism - physiopathology
Drinking - physiology
Europe
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental health
Nutrition Surveys
Random Allocation
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Dehydration is a common fluid disorder which occurs in residents, hospitalised and community-dwelling elderly people. In this study the intake of water and fluids of community-dwelling elderly Europeans is presented in relation to risk factors of dehydration: mental state, ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL), medicine use and body composition. As part of the SENECA-study of 1993, data were collected from a random age-stratified sample (birth cohorts 1913-1918) of inhabitants of small traditional towns in Europe. Food intake data were collected by using the dietary history method. The study population consisted of 629 men and 696 women of the following towns: Hamme/Belgium, Roskilde/Denmark, Haguenau/France, Romans/France, Padua/Italy, Culemborg/the Netherlands, Lisbon/Portugal, Yverdon/Switzerland, Marki/Poland and Ballymoney-Limavady-Portstewart/Northern Ireland/United Kingdom. Fluid intake of elderly people varied between the towns of Europe and between men and women. A high percentage of the female population had a water intake below the cut-off value of 1,700 g. In most towns about 70 percent of daily water intake came from the food groups 'Milk products', 'Alcoholic drinks', 'Juices' and 'Other non-alcoholic drinks'. The consumption of 'Other non-alcoholic drinks' contributed most to daily fluid intake. In the total female population, women with the lowest water intake (first tertile) scored negatively on factors influencing fluid intake (mental state, ADL) in comparison to women of the second and third tertile. However, in the distinct towns no unequivocal relationship emerged between those factors and fluid intake. Yet, women were found to be at higher risk of dehydration because of much lower water intakes than men and because of the overall relationship between a low fluid intake and a poor mental state and ADL problems.
PubMed ID
10995083 View in PubMed
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The nutrient density of present-day and traditional diets and their health aspects: the Sami- and lumberjack families living in rural areas of Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61851
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1999 Jan;58(1):30-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
L. Håglin
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. Lena.Haglin.US@VLL.SE
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1999 Jan;58(1):30-43
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Body mass index
Diet - statistics & numerical data - trends
Energy Metabolism
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Questionnaires
Reindeer
Rural Health
Sweden
Abstract
In a rural area of Northern Sweden, the food consumption of 22 Swedish Sami families and 32 lumberjack families was recorded. Repeated 24-hour recalls were obtained from September 1990 to April 1991. The traditional Sami diet was calculated from interviews with old Sami people living today and from information from the literature. The nutrient density was well above recommended levels for most nutrients except for folate and fiber, in the Sami and lumberjack diets. Sami diet was just below NNR for calcium density and the lumberjacks' diet for selenium density. The present-day diets of Sami families contain less protein than in the past. In lumberjack families today, the intake of energy and fat is less than in the past while protein content has been kept constant over time. Different aspects of these dietary changes and possible health effects are discussed and compared with food consumption in Iceland and Finland in the past.
PubMed ID
10208068 View in PubMed
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Malnutrition in institutionalized elderly: how and why?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219968
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1993 Nov;41(11):1212-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1993
Author
H H Keller
Author Affiliation
Parkwood Hospital, London, Ont., Canada.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1993 Nov;41(11):1212-8
Date
Nov-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Deficiency Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Diet
Feeding Behavior
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Institutionalization
Linear Models
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario
Prevalence
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Skilled Nursing Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of undernutrition and overnutrition in long-term care elderly patients and the functional, behavioral, environmental, nutritional, and medical variables associated with this prevalence.
Cross-sectional, observational.
Long-term care hospital in Canada.
Two hundred elderly patients (n = 166 male), average age 78.5 years.
Assessment of nutritional status and presence of specific behavioral, medical, environmental, and functional characteristics known to impact on nutritional status. Nutritional status was determined by weight, % weight loss, BMI, skinfolds, arm circumference, area measurements, and % body fat. Multiple regression analyses were performed to identify the factors associated specifically with undernutrition and overnutrition in this population.
Severe undernutrition was present in 18% (n = 36) and severe overnutrition in 10% (n = 20). Mild/moderate undernutrition was present in 27.5% (n = 55) and mild/moderate overnutrition in 18% (n = 36). Overnutrition was positively associated with primary diagnosis and number of medications and negatively associated with poor appetite, number of feeding impairments, protein intake, and mental state. Undernutrition was positively associated with dysphagia, slow eating, low protein intake, poor appetite, presence of a feeding tube, and age and negatively associated with primary diagnosis.
Undernutrition exists at a level that is high (45.5%) but not unusual for this type of institutional setting. Behavioral, environmental, and disease-related factors greatly influence nutritional status. Undernutrition appears to be affected by nutritional factors more than overnutrition. Efforts should be directed toward influencing some of these factors to decrease undernutrition in the institutionalized elderly.
PubMed ID
8227896 View in PubMed
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Pervasive occult gastrointestinal bleeding in an Alaska native population with prevalent iron deficiency. Role of Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4873
Source
JAMA. 1997 Apr 9;277(14):1135-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-9-1997
Author
R. Yip
P J Limburg
D A Ahlquist
H A Carpenter
A. O'Neill
D. Kruse
S. Stitham
B D Gold
E W Gunter
A C Looker
A J Parkinson
E D Nobmann
K M Petersen
M. Ellefson
S. Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga, USA.
Source
JAMA. 1997 Apr 9;277(14):1135-9
Date
Apr-9-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Endoscopy, Digestive System
Feces
Female
Gastritis - complications - ethnology - microbiology
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - complications - ethnology - etiology
Helicobacter Infections - complications - ethnology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Hematologic Tests
Humans
Inuits
Iron - deficiency
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To confirm prevalent iron deficiency among Yupik Eskimos living in Alaska and to explore the frequency of and potential lesions accounting for occult gastrointestinal bleeding. DESIGN: Descriptive survey. SETTING: Rural Arctic community. SUBJECTS: A total of 140 adult volunteers from 3 villages in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region of western Alaska. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Daily iron intake, hematologic and biochemical indexes of iron status, fecal hemoglobin levels, stool parasites, and endoscopic findings. RESULTS: While dietary iron intake by Yupiks was similar to that of a reference population, iron deficiency prevalence was increased 13-fold in Yupik men and 4-fold in Yupik women. Fecal hemoglobin levels were elevated in 90% of subjects contrasted with only 4% of a reference group; median levels were 5.9 and 0.5 mg of hemoglobin per gram of stool, respectively. Among 70 Yupik subjects with elevated fecal hemoglobin levels who had endoscopy performed, 68 (97%) had an abnormal gastric appearance consisting of erythema, mucosal thickening, diffuse mucosal hemorrhages, erosions, or ulcerations. Gastric biopsies revealed chronic active gastritis with associated Helicobacter pylori in 68 (99%) of 69. No other hemorrhagic gastrointestinal disease was detected. CONCLUSIONS: Based on this study sample, occult gastrointestinal bleeding appears to be pervasive in the Yupik population and likely underlies the prevalent iron deficiency. An atypical hemorrhagic gastritis associated with H pylori infection is present almost universally and may represent the bleeding source.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1997 Apr 9;277(14):1166-79087475
PubMed ID
9087468 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.