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Some aspects of the structure and organization of child nutrition in a number of regions Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289845
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(6):95-102
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
T V Mazhaeva
O V Chugunova
D V Grashchenkov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(6):95-102
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Russia
Abstract
This research aims to assess catering arrangements and dietary patterns of children at preschool educational institution and at home. The article analyses catering arrange­ments for pre-school children (3-7-year-old) from Ekaterinburg, Nizhny Tagil, Kamensk-Uralsky, Vladikavkaz and Krasnoyarsk. Based on menu production records provided by preschool educational institution, and family nutrition questionnaires we have examined their compliance with the nutritional physiological standards. The summarized data on menu production records from preschool educational institutions showed whether they met food basket requirements (net weight), as well as nutritional value requirements (proteins, fats, carbohydrates, calories content). The assessment was carried out in Ekaterinburg, Nizhny Tagil and Krasnoyarsk using Public catering calculations software (version 5) and a proprietary database of childreris food formulae. Childrens food basket assess­ment in Ekaterinburg and Kamensk-Uralsky revealed underconsumptionof vegetables (17.9-38% decrease), milk (52.7-62% decrease), curd (40.2-45.3% decrease). We have also observed decreased consumption of fruits, including dried fruit, by 31.8%, as well as cereals and legumes by 43% in Kamensk-Uralsky. Macronutrient analysis has shown underconsumption of total carbohydrates (by 19%) and animal proteins. The assessment of children nutrition at home has been carried out using NUTRITEST-IP diagnostic sys­tem in Nizhny Tagil, Kamensk-Uralsky, Vladikavkaz and Krasnoyarsk. The results showed overconsumption of most foods except vegetables. Excessive intake of fats and sugars (3.6 and 3.5 fold higher, respectively) accounted for higher than normal energy consump­tion by children at home. The evaluation has also revealed a significant difference in the consumption of saturated fats, mono - and disaccharides, food fibers and vitamin C by the children from the locations included in the study. The excessive intake of simple carbohy­drates was typical for family diets and excessive fat intake was characteristic for child diet in preschool educational institution.
PubMed ID
29377657 View in PubMed
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Timing of complementary feeding and associations with maternal and infant characteristics: A Norwegian cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299492
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0199455
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Christine Helle
Elisabet R Hillesund
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0199455
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Norwegian Health authorities recommend solid food to be introduced between child age 4-6 months, depending on both the mother´s and infant's needs. The aim of this paper is to describe timing of complementary feeding in a current sample of Norwegian mother/infant-dyads and explore potential associations between timing of introduction to solid foods and a wide range of maternal and infant characteristics known from previous literature to influence early feeding interactions. The paper is based on data from the Norwegian randomized controlled trial Early Food for Future Health. In 2016, a total of 715 mothers completed a web-based questionnaire at child age 5.5 months. We found that 5% of the infants were introduced to solid food before 4 months of age, while 14% were not introduced to solid food at 5.5 months of age. Introduction of solid food before 4 months of age was associated with the infant not being exclusive breastfed the first month, receiving only formula milk at 3 months, the mother being younger, not married/cohabitant, smoking, less educated and having more economic difficulties. Not being introduced to solid food at 5.5 months was associated with the infant being a girl, being exclusive breastfed the first month, receiving only breastmilk at 3 months, the mother being older, married and having 3 or more children. This study shows that there are still clear socioeconomic differences regarding timing of complementary feeding in Norway. Infants of younger, less educated and smoking mothers are at higher risk of not being fed in compliance with the official infant feeding recommendations. Our findings emphasize the importance of targeting socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers for support on healthy feeding practices focusing on the infant`s needs to prevent early onset of social inequalities in health.
PubMed ID
29949644 View in PubMed
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Birth weight is associated with dietary factors at the age of 6-8 years: the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299373
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1278-1285
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Aino-Maija Eloranta
Jarmo Jääskeläinen
Taisa Venäläinen
Henna Jalkanen
Sanna Kiiskinen
Aino Mäntyselkä
Ursula Schwab
Virpi Lindi
Timo A Lakka
Author Affiliation
1Institute of Biomedicine,Physiology, School of Medicine,University of Eastern Finland,PO Box 1627, Fin-70211Kuopio,Finland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1278-1285
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Birth Weight - physiology
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Abstract
Low and high birth weight have been associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes and CVD. Diet could partly mediate this association, e.g. by intra-uterine programming of unhealthy food preferences. We examined the association of birth weight with diet in Finnish children.
Birth weight standard deviation score (SDS) was calculated using national birth register data and Finnish references. Dietary factors were assessed using 4 d food records. Diet quality was defined by the Finnish Children Healthy Eating Index (FCHEI).
The Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) study.
Singleton, full-term children (179 girls, 188 boys) aged 6-8 years.
Birth weight was inversely associated (standardized regression coefficient ß; 95 % CI) with FCHEI (-0·15; -0·28, -0·03) in all children and in boys (-0·27; -0·45, -0·09) but not in girls (-0·01; -0·21, 0·18) after adjusting for potential confounders (P=0·044 for interaction). Moreover, higher birth weight was associated with lower fruit and berries consumption (-0·13; -0·25, 0·00), higher energy intake (0·17; 0·05, 0·29), higher sucrose intake (0·19; 0·06, 0·32) and lower fibre intake (-0·14; -0·26, -0·01). These associations were statistically non-significant after correction for multiple testing. Children with birth weight >1 SDS had higher sucrose intake (mean; 95 % CI) as a percentage of energy intake (14·3 E%; 12·6, 16·0 E%) than children with birth weight of -1 to 1 SDS (12·8 E%; 11·6, 14·0 E%) or
PubMed ID
29409562 View in PubMed
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[Nutrition of children in modern Russian family: social and economic aspect].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299447
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2018; 87(2):103-107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
2018
Author
Yu V Migunova
R M Sadykov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research is a separate structural subdivision of the Ufa Federal Research Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences.
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2018; 87(2):103-107
Date
2018
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Eating
Energy intake
Family
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Nutritive Value
Quality of Life
Russia
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The aim of this article is to study the problem of the nutritional status of children in a modern Russian family. This work is based on the analysis of statistical data of the results of a sample survey of households' budgets, reflecting the interrelationship between the standard of living of the Russian family and children, its material wealth, the possibility of high quality, high-grade nutrition for all its members, especially children. The standard of living, the share of food expenditure, the consumption of basic food groups, the nutritive and energy value of diets in households with children (a family with one child, two, three or more children) were studied. The article discusses the issues related to the limited consumption of various food products in families with children. There is an increase in consumption of bread products and potatoes, as well as sugar and confectionery products in all types of households with children, but especially in large families, while reducing the consumption of other groups of products. The paper presents an analysis of the nutritive and energy value of the diet in all types of families surveyed. It is emphasized that in households with one or two children the nutritive value of the diet is significantly higher than in large families. In the diet of large families there is a lackof protein (11.8% of calories). The fat content in the diet of families with children exceeds the recommended level (34.8-36.6% of calories). In general, the quality of nutrition in families with one child is higher than in households with two or more children. The nutritional status of children in families with low incomes, which often include the average family with the birth of a child, especially several, does not correspond to the medical and biological standards approved for modern society. Obviously, the higher is living standard of the population, the lower is the share of expenditure on food, and vice versa. With the advent of children, the living standard of a household decreases. Thus, according to official data, the share of food expenditures in families with children in 2016 was 34.4% of the family budget for families raising one child, 36.9% for families raising two children, 40.1% for households with three or more children. Accordingly, the lower is the living standard of the family, the less they spend on maintaining the health of children, their education and recreation. The paper emphasizes that the problem of rational nutrition of the population has a pronounced social and economic significance and belongs to the global categories that play a significant role in ensuring the quality of life of a person, maintaining his health and longevity of life.
PubMed ID
30592874 View in PubMed
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Pessimism, diet, and the ability to improve dietary habits: a three-year follow-up study among middle-aged and older Finnish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300930
Source
Nutr J. 2018 10 15; 17(1):92
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-15-2018
Author
Mikko Pänkäläinen
Mikael Fogelholm
Raisa Valve
Olli Kampman
Markku Kauppi
Erja Lappalainen
Jukka Hintikka
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Päijät-Häme Central Hospital, Keskussairaalankatu 7, FI-15850, Lahti, Finland. mikko.pankalainen@phsotey.fi.
Source
Nutr J. 2018 10 15; 17(1):92
Date
10-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Diet - psychology
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Personality
Pessimism - psychology
Abstract
Dietary habits have a great influence on physiological health. Even though this fact is generally recognized, people do not eat as healthily as they know they should. The factors that support a healthy diet, on the other hand, are not well known. It is supposed that there is a link between personal traits and dietary habits. Personal traits may also partially explain why some people manage to make healthy dietary changes while some fail to do so or are not able to try to make changes even when they desire to do so. There is some information suggesting that dispositional optimism plays a role in succeeding in improving dietary habits. The aim of this study was to determine the role of optimism and pessimism in the process of dietary changes.
Dispositional optimism and pessimism were determined using the revised Life Orientation Test in 2815 individuals (aged 52-76 years) participating in the GOAL study in the region of Lahti, Finland. The dietary habits of the study subjects were analysed. After 3 years, the subjects' dietary habits and their possible improvements were registered. The associations between dispositional optimism and pessimism, dietary habits at baseline, and possible changes in dietary habits during the follow-up were studied with logistic regression. We also studied if the dietary habits or certain lifestyle factors (e.g. physical exercising and smoking) at baseline predicted success in improving the diet.
Pessimism seemed to correlate clearly negatively with the healthiness of the dietary habits at baseline - i.e. the higher the level of pessimism, the unhealthier the diet. Optimism also showed a correlation with dietary habits at baseline, although to a lesser extent. Those who managed to improve their dietary habits during follow-up or regarded their dietary habits as healthy enough even without a change were less pessimistic at baseline than those who failed in their attempts to improve their diet or did not even try, even when they recognized the need for a change.
Pessimistic people are more likely to eat an unhealthy diet than others. Pessimism reduces independently the possibilities to improve dietary patterns.
PubMed ID
30322387 View in PubMed
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Can profiles of poly- and Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in human serum provide information on major exposure sources?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296906
Source
Environ Health. 2018 02 01; 17(1):11
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
02-01-2018
Author
Xindi C Hu
Clifton Dassuncao
Xianming Zhang
Philippe Grandjean
Pál Weihe
Glenys M Webster
Flemming Nielsen
Elsie M Sunderland
Author Affiliation
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. xhu@mail.harvard.edu.
Source
Environ Health. 2018 02 01; 17(1):11
Date
02-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Child
Denmark
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Prospective Studies
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Humans are exposed to poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) from diverse sources and this has been associated with negative health impacts. Advances in analytical methods have enabled routine detection of more than 15 PFASs in human sera, allowing better profiling of PFAS exposures. The composition of PFASs in human sera reflects the complexity of exposure sources but source identification can be confounded by differences in toxicokinetics affecting uptake, distribution, and elimination. Common PFASs, such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and their precursors are ubiquitous in multiple exposure sources. However, their composition varies among sources, which may impact associated adverse health effects.
We use available PFAS concentrations from several demographic groups in a North Atlantic seafood consuming population (Faroe Islands) to explore whether chemical fingerprints in human sera provide insights into predominant exposure sources. We compare serum PFAS profiles from Faroese individuals to other North American populations to investigate commonalities in potential exposure sources. We compare individuals with similar demographic and physiological characteristics and samples from the same years to reduce confounding by toxicokinetic differences and changing environmental releases.
Using principal components analysis (PCA) confirmed by hierarchical clustering, we assess variability in serum PFAS concentrations across three Faroese groups. The first principal component (PC)/cluster consists of C9-C12 perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) and is consistent with measured PFAS profiles in consumed seafood. The second PC/cluster includes perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS) and the PFOS precursor N-ethyl perfluorooctane sulfonamidoacetate (N-EtFOSAA), which are directly used or metabolized from fluorochemicals in consumer products such as carpet and food packaging. We find that the same compounds are associated with the same exposure sources in two North American populations, suggesting generalizability of results from the Faroese population.
We conclude that PFAS homologue profiles in serum provide valuable information on major exposure sources. It is essential to compare samples collected at similar time periods and to correct for demographic groups that are highly affected by differences in physiological processes (e.g., pregnancy). Information on PFAS homologue profiles is crucial for attributing adverse health effects to the proper mixtures or individual PFASs.
PubMed ID
29391068 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal Cultural Competency in Dietetics: A National Survey of Canadian Registered Dietitians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293524
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2017 12 01; 78(4):172-176
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-01-2017
Author
Paige Huycke
Jillian Ingribelli
Lee Rysdale
Author Affiliation
a Northern Ontario Dietetic Internship Program, Sault Ste. Marie, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2017 12 01; 78(4):172-176
Date
12-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Clinical Competence
Cultural Competency - education
Cultural Diversity
Diet
Dietary Services
Dietetics - education
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritionists - education
Ontario
Preceptorship
Young Adult
Abstract
Little has been published on cultural competency curriculum and dietetics considering the impact of food-related beliefs and behaviours on health. A 14-item online survey was administered in January 2016 to 145 participants (125 members of Dietitians of Canada Aboriginal Nutrition Network and 20 dietitians with an interest in Aboriginal nutrition). Questions included multiple choice and ranking responses and were pretested by 4 preceptors with the Northern Ontario Dietetic Internship Program (NODIP). Quantitative data analysis included frequencies, pivot tables, and averaging/grouping of ranking scores. A total of 42 individuals (29%) completed the survey. The majority rated the 5 health and cultural competencies and 6 food and nutrition competencies as "important" (90%-98% and 86%-100%, respectively). Overall, the competency related to identifying health status was ranked highest (78%), whereas developing culturally appropriate recipes was ranked lowest (83%). Most participants (95%) believed that all dietitians and graduating dietetic interns should be minimally competent in Aboriginal health and culture. The initial 11 draft competencies for dietetic interns were condensed to 6 minimum and 2 advanced competencies. Results will inform dietitians working with Aboriginal peoples and refinement of NODIP intern and preceptor tools, with the potential to integrate across Canadian dietetic internship programs.
PubMed ID
28333567 View in PubMed
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[Sources of added sugar and their possible significance in the formation of obesity and overweight].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299454
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2018; 87(4):56-61
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
T N Solntseva
R A Khanferyan
R M Radzhabkadiev
V S Evstratova
Author Affiliation
Federal Research Centre of Nutrition, Biotechnology and Food Safety, Moscow.
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2018; 87(4):56-61
Date
2018
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Child
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - physiopathology
Sugars - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweetening Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
The results of a study on the frequency of consumption of added sugar by the population of the Central Federal District of the Russian Federation are presented obtained on the basis of a questioning of 2043 persons of both sexes (Moscow, Kaluga, Michurinsk, Tambov). The sample in each age group of the subjects (12-17, 18-30, 31-45, 46-60 years) was about 150 persons of each sex. The gender distribution within the sample was uniform with a slight predominance of females (53.6%). Analysis of the results showed that 58% of those surveyed daily consumed added sugar with hot drinks; of these, 30% of interviewees consumed 1 teaspoon of sugar 2-3 times a day (56-84 kcal per day); 8% of respondents - 4-5 times a day (28-35 g, which corresponded to 112-140 kcal); 6% of the population - 6 or more times a day (42 g or more, more than 168 kcal). Only 22% of the surveyed did not consume sugar with tea and coffee. There was no correlation between BMI, the presence of excessive body weight and the consumption of added sugar with hot drinks. Only frequent intake of added sugar with drinks (2-3 to 4-5 times or more per day) had a statistically determined dependence with an increase in body mass index in the age groups of 31-45 and 46-60 years.
PubMed ID
30570958 View in PubMed
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Adherence to special diets and its association with meeting the nutrient recommendations in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294978
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
A J Ahola
C Forsblom
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, University of Helsinki, Biomedicum Helsinki C318b, PO Box 63, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diet therapy - epidemiology
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet, Diabetic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Not much is known about adherence to special diets in type 1 diabetes, characteristics of individuals with special diets, and whether such practices should raise concerns with respect to meeting the dietary recommendations. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of adherence to special diets, in a population of individuals with type 1 diabetes, and investigated the association between special diet adherence and dietary intake, measured as dietary patterns and nutrient intakes.
During the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study visit, participants with type 1 diabetes (n?=?1429) were instructed to complete a diet questionnaire inquiring about the adherence to special diets. The participants also completed a food record, from which energy and nutrient intakes were calculated.
In all, 36.6% participants reported adhering to some special diet. Most commonly reported special diets were lactose-free (17.1%), protein restriction (10.0%), vegetarian (7.0%), and gluten-free (5.6%) diet. Special diet adherents were more frequently women, older, had longer diabetes duration, and more frequently had various diabetes complications. Mean carbohydrate intakes were close to the lower levels of the recommendation in all diet groups, which was reflected in low mean fibre intakes but high frequencies of meeting the sucrose recommendations. The recommendation for saturated fatty acid intake was frequently unmet, with the highest frequencies observed in vegetarians. Of the micronutrients, vitamin D, folate, and iron recommendations were most frequently unmet, with some differences between the diet groups.
Special diets are frequently followed by individuals with type 1 diabetes. The adherents are more frequently women, and have longer diabetes duration and more diabetes complications. Achieving the dietary recommendations differed between diets, and depended on the nutrient in question. Overall, intakes of fibre, vitamin D, folate, and iron fell short of the recommendations.
PubMed ID
29777369 View in PubMed
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Associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year olds: BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291600
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: a.l.kristiansen@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Parenting - ethnology
Parents
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Principal Component Analysis
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The home environment is the first environment to shape childhood dietary habits and food preferences, hence greater understanding of home environmental factors associated with vegetable consumption among young children is needed. The objective has been to examine questionnaire items developed to measure the sociocultural home environment of children focusing on vegetables and to assess the psychometric properties of the resulting factors. Further, to explore associations between the environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5 year olds. Parents (n 633) were invited to participate and filled in a questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing this, along with a 24-h recall of their child's fruit and vegetable intake. Children's fruit and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten were observed by researchers. Principal components analysis was used to examine items assessing the sociocultural home environment. Encouragement items resulted in factors labelled "reactive encouragement", "child involvement" and "reward". Modelling items resulted in the factors labelled "active role model" and "practical role model". Items assessing negative parental attitudes resulted in the factor labelled "negative parental attitudes" and items assessing family pressure/demand resulted in the factor labelled "family demand". The psychometric properties of the factors were for most satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed, as expected, generally positive associations with "child involvement", "practical role model" and "family demand", and negative associations with "negative parental attitudes" and "reward". Unexpectedly, "reactive encouragement" was negatively associated with vegetable consumption. In conclusion, associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and children's vegetable consumption showed both expected and unexpected associations some of which differed by maternal education - pointing to a need for further comparable studies.
PubMed ID
28676449 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.