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Growth and nutrition of preschool Indian children in Manitoba: II. Nutrient intakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244686
Source
Can J Public Health. 1981 Mar-Apr;72(2):127-33
Publication Type
Article

Nutrition survey of schoolchildren in greater Winnipeg. I. Descriptive and anthropometric data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250070
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Mar 5;116(5):490-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-1977
Author
J. Ellestad-Sayed
J C Haworth
H. Medovy
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Mar 5;116(5):490-2
Date
Mar-5-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Nutrition Surveys
Occupations
Parents
School Health Services
Social Class
Abstract
By sequential random numbering 10 schools in greater Winnipeg were selected for a nutrition survey. Interviews were conducted with 201 grade 3 children and 182 grade 6 children for whom parental consent was obtained. Of these, 48 in grade 3 and 51 in grade 6 were studied in further detail. There were no differences in descriptive data between the general and detailed groups or among the 10 schools. Most fathers were skilled or unskilled labourers and about 50% of the mothers were homemakers without outside employment; parental occupation did not influence eating patterns. Breakfast was the meal most often missed; 8% of the 383 children had come to school without breakfast. Since many children in grade 3 had prepared their own breakfast and since there was a relative lack of physical activity, school health programs should incorporate more than nutritional supplements and nutrition education. On the basis of body weight and height the nutritional status of the 99 children studied in detail was judged to be generally satisfactory; according to the Boston standards the boys were heavy and tall, and the girls were normal in weight but short.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1963 Feb 16;88:351-514024227
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1973 Apr;62(4):409-154691953
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1972 Sep;61(3):268-755050330
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1972 Sep;61(3):262-85050329
PubMed ID
837314 View in PubMed
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Vitamin D deficiency in a Manitoba community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220003
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Nov-Dec;84(6):394-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
J B Lebrun
M E Moffatt
R J Mundy
R K Sangster
B D Postl
J P Dooley
L A Dilling
J C Godel
J C Haworth
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Nov-Dec;84(6):394-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Manitoba - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Sciences - education
Rickets - etiology - prevention & control
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - complications - epidemiology
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
Using a cross-sectional survey, to investigate the vitamin D status of a random sample of 80 mother-child pairs (child age 3-24 months) in a Manitoba community with a high incidence of rickets.
A questionnaire on feeding habits, gestational history, maternal diet and vitamin supplements was administered to mothers in their homes with the assistance of a local interpreter. Venous blood was collected from both mother and child for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.
Of 91% babies initially breastfed, 36% received no formula or milk after weaning and 40% received no vitamin supplements. 24% of mothers took no vitamin supplements during pregnancy and lactation. Knowledge about rickets was poor. In 43% of children and 76% of mothers, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were below normal range.
Vitamin D levels are low in this population due to lack of fortified dairy products and vitamin D supplements. A public health program should include counseling on rickets and vitamin D supplementation for all infants and pregnant or lactating women.
PubMed ID
8131142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nutrition survey of schoolchildren in greater Winnipeg. II. Dietary intake and biochemical assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250069
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Mar 5;116(5):494-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-1977
Author
J. Ellestad-Sayed
J C Haworth
H. Medovy
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Mar 5;116(5):494-7
Date
Mar-5-1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Child
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Health education
Hemoglobinometry
Humans
Manitoba
Minerals - administration & dosage
Nutrition Surveys
Riboflavin - urine
School Health Services
Thiamine - urine
Thiamine Deficiency - epidemiology
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Abstract
The total dietary intake of energy and of individual nutrients of 99 grades 3 and 6 children from 10 greater Winnipeg shcools were generally comparable to those reported by Nutrition Canada for the Manitoba and national samples, although the percentile distributions of total caloric intake and dietary intake of vitamin A for the Winnipeg children tended to be lower. The median daily intake of protein was 212% of the Canadian Dietary Standard and most came from animal sources. Dietary fat was largely from animal sources as well. Hemoglobin concentrations were marginally low in four children, and urinary riboflavin:creatinine ratios were low in six children. There was no biochemical evidence of thiamin deficiency. The results suggest a need for change in dietary patterns and for education in nutrition, including relative nutrient/cost benefits. A well planned school snack program with an education component is a medium by which change could be introduced. This should preferable be part of a total school health program.
Notes
Cites: Biochem J. 1946;40(5-6):644-5216748068
Cites: J Nutr. 1959 Oct;69:191-414424232
Cites: J Nutr. 1950 Jun 10;41(2):247-6415422413
Cites: J Nutr. 1965 Mar;85:287-9614261840
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1962 Nov;11:462-7613942266
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1974 May;27(5):485-5044207340
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1972 Mar;25(3):273-45011908
Cites: World Rev Nutr Diet. 1971;13:105-644935603
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1966 Jun;18(6):458-665938198
PubMed ID
837315 View in PubMed
Less detail